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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (10 posts)

Are Asian children more intelligent than American children. because their parent

  1. brakel2 profile image80
    brakel2posted 7 years ago

    Are Asian children more intelligent than American children. because their parents are good role...

    models and they have respect for elders?

  2. sofs profile image82
    sofsposted 7 years ago

    I am an Asian but I will not go so far to say one is more intelligent than the other.
    We work hard. Qualification is a must. Academic excellence is high priority. Parents will go to any extent to help their children persue education to the highest level. Our children as a rule don't  work to support themselves ( may not be a good thing).
    Parents sacrifice a lot for their children's education - I'll even go to say they hardly have a life of their own.
    This may not be a great thing in some cases, for we see many children are to pushed to such high levels of stress as parents live their life through their children.
    Over all in this part of the world you can't survive without it!!

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      EXACTLY, Asian parents value academic excellence.  They also realize the paramount importance of education, especially higher education, in terms of socioeconomics.

  3. Scott Mandrake profile image56
    Scott Mandrakeposted 7 years ago

    From my experience, as a parent and from conversation with Asian parents I can say that there is only a few factors that lead many of us to believe Asian children are more intelligent.

    Factor one: physical punishment.  It has become taboo or even socially unacceptable to spank, swat, slap, etc a child, Yours or otherwise. Many Asian societies still endorse a good swat when a child gets out of line, or even flunks a test.

    Factor two: Viral video.  For the most part, the only view we have of Asian children is on youtube or some other viral video site.  In these video's we see extremely talented children doing extraordinary things.  Over time this would lead us to believe that most Asian kids are intelligent or talented

    Factor three: Welfare.  Most Asian people I have met grew up facing the prospect of factory work or business.  To be in business you had to be well educated. The huge population creates a lot of competition for a decent job outside the factories.  On our side however, you can be smart, but its not the end of the world if you are not as you can live off welfare until you win the lottery. 

    I personally feel that Asian children have more reason to be motivated to excel.  To me that is normal.  Laziness and stupidity seems to be something to strive for in North America. 

    Scott

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Great synopsis, Scott!

  4. telltale profile image74
    telltaleposted 7 years ago

    Irrespective whether the children are Asian or American, if a child is intelligent, he/she is intelligent per se, that's what I know based on meeting up with such children.  If you say for good role models and respect for elders, yes, it is instill into Asians more than Americans, I believe, in general, but not in specific.  But with modern exposure to society and culture, certain Asian groups of the current generation may not show the same kind of respect for elders, as the older generation.

  5. Lisa HW profile image72
    Lisa HWposted 7 years ago

    Without trying to get into studies, theories, generalizations, and whatever else someone may factor in when drawing that particular conclusion; one point is that there are different types of intelligence.  In families where high academic achievement is valued children are more likely to achieve in school.

    There are, however, different types of intelligence; and if it's true that many Asian students excel in some subjects, like Math; the other side to that is they may not do as well in some types of thinking as some American children do.

    Many Japanese mothers, however, focus very much on remaining in one-to-one contact with their child and on teaching them a number of different things from the time they're babies on.  So, in that kind of situation it would be simply be all that one-on-one teaching and attention a child gets.

    I don't want to sound obnoxious, and I'm only going to say this to back up my point; but I think it's too much of a generalization to say that Asian children are more intelligent than American children.  Based on my own (grown) kids' intelligence, academic skills, many talents, and social maturity when they were young; (and based on a lot of the very intelligent and similarly talented kids I met through their friends or my own) there are a lot of pretty darned intelligent American kids.  One problem may be that a lot of people don't talk about all those intelligent and achieving American kids because they think nobody has to worry about them.  Instead, we hear about all the American kids who do well enough but don't excel, or else who don't do well at all.  If you send your American kids into public school, where they're several grade levels ahead, nobody wants to talk to you about meeting their academic needs because people think there are no particular needs for kids who do that well.  So one problem in America may be the public schools and the apparent favoring of slightly above average, while placing lots of attention of those students who are average or below.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Spot on analysis, I could not have said it better.  The American educational system, unfortunately and sadly, favors mediocrity over excellence!

  6. swapna123 profile image67
    swapna123posted 7 years ago

    Intelligence is not a measurable component. Only the grades are.
       I am from India, and we do have kids who do quite well in academics and cultural activities and yes, most of the children do respect their parents.That is not just because of the cultural differences or the way they are brought up, it is also because children are totally dependent on parents till they graduate and start working. The concept of working to support their education doesn't exist in middle class or rich households. In fact, parents from middle-income-group spend half of their income on the educational expenses of their children. They even take personal loans to meet the expenses and their lives completely revolve around their kids. Most of them expect the children to take care of them in their old age.

    However, illiteracy and poverty are still major issues in our country and there are lots of kids from lower-income strata who have to work and earn their bread without any thought of academics. Child labor is rampant among this group. There are also few parents who abandon children since they are not able to support them. These children are left to fend for themselves or depend on some NGO to take care of them.

    Maybe the Asian children whom you meet at US seem to be academically more brilliant. However, it is because the people who migrate to US are those who were good at their academics themselves and they ensure that their children also do well in their studies.

  7. profile image58
    Shaktivaposted 2 years ago

    No.

    I think it's in their language and natural environment that's more stimulating.

 
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