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What is the worst or most impractical piece of advice your parents ever gave you

  1. bethperry profile image91
    bethperryposted 4 years ago

    What is the worst or most impractical piece of advice your parents ever gave you?

    No one is perfect in their thinking, not even our parents. What is the worst or most impractical piece of advice your parents ever gave you?

  2. TheYoungDad profile image78
    TheYoungDadposted 4 years ago

    The worst advice my dad gave me was that I should be a lawyer because I like reading and because I have a retentive memory. Im not a lawyer, but this advice and his expectations was part of a rift between me and him growing up, along with the teenage drama and all that.

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Sorry to hear it, TheYoungDad. Not everyone has the inclination to pursue law. And, in my opinion, this is a darned good thing!

  3. pinto2011 profile image76
    pinto2011posted 4 years ago

    I have never felt in my life that my parents have ever given me any worst or impractical piece of advice. May be at that point of time, I felt so, but as the time goes by, I felt that they were right with their years of experience and care for me.

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      pinto2011, you're a lucky individual!

  4. RNMSN profile image91
    RNMSNposted 4 years ago

    for me, the most impractical piece of advice involved money.....specifically that the job I had Must make the Most money...without taking into account how it affected my ellbeing...to me, the money should be secondary and the joy, the fulfillment of the job should alway be uppermost...

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      RNMSN, I agree with you, and money definitely doesn't buy happiness.

  5. peachpurple profile image84
    peachpurpleposted 4 years ago

    Go to work and earn money. No need to go further study, waste of time and money. And that is how i end up here....

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      That sucks, peachpurple sad

  6. profile image0
    Ghost32posted 4 years ago

    Easy one.
    I was 17, just out of high school, when the engine blew completely in my 1952 Chevy. 
    I'd paid local dealer Ray Fischer $200 for that car.  He had a 1956 Chevy with 46,000 miles on it, totally cherry, 245 straight six engine, ran like new.  He had it priced at $600.  We talked, and he made me an offer:  He'd take the '52 back in trade for the full $200 I'd paid him originally EVEN THOUGH THE CAR NOW HAD A BLOWN ENGINE, meaning he needed $400 cash for the '56 and it would be mine.
    It was the best car deal I was ever offered throughout my entire life. 
    However, my parents nixed the deal.  I had money in a savings account, mostly from money donated by my grandmother over the years, intended primarily to see me through college (which it did partially, but not all the way).  I would have control of that money once I turned 18, but that wasn't until November.
    There was no budging them, and I hated them for it.  Still do to this day, and they've been dead for years now.  I don't bring it up when I see them in the dream state, but I don't forget, either.
    Over the years, I kept a very careful mental log of every "unnecessary repair" expense that had to go into the '52.  (My parents wouldn't let me buy the newer car but did authorize $145 for a used engine out of a wrecking yard, and it went from there.)  The "dollar loss" that most likely would NOT have hit with the '56 came to something over $2,000 in a 3 year period.

    Let's see, y'all "saved" me from spending $400...and I only had to end up shelling out $2,000 for the privilege.  Great economics there, Mom & Dad.  Thanks a lot.

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Ghost32, yeah, that sounds quite short-sighted "common sense" on their part sad

 
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