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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

How do you feel about women starting families after 40?

  1. Nicole Henley profile image77
    Nicole Henleyposted 4 years ago

    How do you feel about women starting families after 40?

  2. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 4 years ago

    I think anything's possible and with the advances in medicine there are many options available to these types of potential mothers. There are many GOOD reasons for delaying childbirth such as waiting to be married and very well padded financially. Many women bear children before they are ready to financially and otherwise. However, those over 40 should ensure they are in good overall health and take into account any family diseases that may affect the mother and/or baby. Also, if one has a string of miscarriages or deaths, then it may not be something that was meant to be. Some women refuse to accept this and continue trying even after 4 or 5.

  3. Maggie Bennett profile image72
    Maggie Bennettposted 4 years ago

    Well, considering you may not live long enough to see your kids into adulthood is a very real possibility starting out this late in life.  Your life is about half over at 40.  Even with the advances in medicine life expectancy really hasn't improved. 40 is still 40 even if the media tries its hardest to tell you its the new 30.

    Another thing is while you may have more financial security you probably will have more work responsibilities also. 

    You also will not be in great shape.  Most American woman at 40 or not in good shape.  Some are, but they are not the norm,  So you will not be playing with your child the way you could and should.

    Also you will probably not see any of your grandchildren. Especially if your children follow in your footsteps.  This is a major factor considering most grands help their children out financially, but more importantly physically with babysitting.

    When a person wants to start a family it is up to them, but I think many people aren't being as realistic as they should be. There is too much uncertainty in life especially once a person hits the big 50. If a woman only starts having children in her 40's then she really risks leaving her children with an uncertain future should something happen to her. Even more so if mom is a single with no partner. 

    It is a cost analysis measure for me.  However, if a woman is over 40 and wants to still have children and never had the opportunity before I would say she should go for it.  My problem is when it becomes a fashion trend because it actually is not a good model.  Their is a reason why the body is optimized for younger child bearing .... it is safer for everyone.  .

  4. Abby Campbell profile image95
    Abby Campbellposted 4 years ago

    I think that is the decision of the woman to start her family after 40... no one else's. I have read some of your other comments that seem quite negative about this. I'll tell you from experience that health is never guaranteed, whether it be after the age of 40 or before. I found out I had a progressive form of cancer when I was pregnant with my second child at 25 and was only given five years to live. Thankfully, God had other plans for me. I was healed and my daughter is nearly 20 now. I am now 45 years old and in the best shape of my life. My labs even show that. So, I would NEVER deter you or any other woman from starting a family after 40 because of the potential for health problems. For goodness sakes, one can die from an accident on any given day! Right?

    When I turned 40, my husband and I contemplated on having more children as I knew fertility would be coming to a halt in the near future. My teen girls were very negative about this saying, "You are too old. Your baby would have Downs Syndrome." I had to laugh. I have a 25 year old daughter who I had at the age of 20 with Autism, and I've had friends who have had children with Downs in their early to late 20s. Again, there is never a guarantee in life with what shall be brought forth.

    If you are a healthy woman in her 40s and want to start your family, I say "Go for it!" You deserve to experience all that will make you happy in life. :-)

  5. profile image0
    Justsilvieposted 4 years ago

    I think if they are healthy and able more power to them.

    My daughter in law gave birth at forty-one, eleven months ago, after 20 years of marriage and a couple of years of trying. She is a fantastic, very youthful and active mother and I compare how she is and how I was as a mother and she comes out on top. Life experiences is a plus in parenting.  Every women should have children at an age that works for them.

  6. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 4 years ago

    I think it is a personal preference.  Hopefully, they are aware of the increase in birth defects with the mother's age.  My only concern is the child.  Will the parents (if older) still be able and have the energy to do all of the things with the child that the child needs.

    I was 30 and 33 when my kids were born and my husband and I noticed we seemed so much older than other parents when we went to school functions. 

    My mother was 39 when I was born and sometimes she was mistaken for my grandmother which really bothered me.

    But those little things aside, if the woman is healthy and wants to wait until 40, then that is her decision.

  7. cat on a soapbox profile image98
    cat on a soapboxposted 4 years ago

    To each her own! My only child was born 2 mo. before my 44th B-Day. I didn't try to get pregnant, it just happened that way. I was in great shape both mentally and physically, and have a youthful approach to life. There will be times when a mom will be mistaken for a grandma when in the presence of younger women, and it is best to keep age quiet. Most  moms of a child's friends'  will average 14-20 years younger. Often, I found myself relating more to the nanas at kid's parties-lol.   Typically, menopause comes later for these women and presents its own challenges when kids are teens. That said, motherhood is wonderful at any age!

  8. ImproveBallet profile image62
    ImproveBalletposted 3 years ago

    My son married a woman must older than him and they started a family when she was 42 and now have two beautiful kids. I suppose the woman's health is the deciding factor

 
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