How do you feel about the Copenhagen Zoo spectator slaughtering of Marius?

Jump to Last Post 1-34 of 34 discussions (77 posts)
  1. bethperry profile image92
    bethperryposted 4 years ago

    How do you feel about the Copenhagen Zoo spectator slaughtering of Marius?

    The Copenhagen Zoo has euthanized Marius, a perfectly healthy male giraffe, citing that he did not fit in with the gene pool they wanted for their giraffe population. After destroying Marius, the zoo officials dissected his body in -and in front of children- then proceeded to feed his remains to lions. How would you categorize the zoo's actions: necessary, cold-hearted, inhumane, barbaric or something else?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/8728460_f260.jpg

  2. Organised Kaos profile image94
    Organised Kaosposted 4 years ago

    Damn disgraceful! It's meant to be an animal haven!

    Fair enough they needed to avoid in-breeding, but a private zoo offered to take him as well as another zoo in the UK

    Was a bad, wrong move and whomever authorized and enacted willingly, should be brought to account!

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Organised Kaos, thank you. I find it very difficult to think of them as a haven now. If it was a matter of avoiding inbreeding, they could have just neutered him.

    2. Efficient Admin profile image92
      Efficient Adminposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      A private zoo offered to take Marius, and so did another zoo in the UK? I am thinking there is a special place in Hades for whoever made and carried out this decision. Barbaric.  Cold-hearted.

    3. katwoman55 profile image60
      katwoman55posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I do not agree with the choices that the zoo made~and what is done is done. All anyone can do now is make the future of other animals safer, so this never happens again. Thanks.

  3. raymondphilippe profile image84
    raymondphilippeposted 4 years ago

    My gut feeling is disgust. I can't tell if it was necessary. But I am very glad my kids didn't have to watch this.
    I am not sure i would want to fit in with the gene pool of the Copenhagen Zoo management. ;-)
    But as said before. It's my feeling speeking here. Haven't given the rational much thought.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for sharing, raymondphilippe.

    2. Efficient Admin profile image92
      Efficient Adminposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Well said raymondphilippe, these people must be cold hearted and/or barbaric -- a zoo is supposed to be a safe haven for animals even if they are sick. Didn't fit into the gene pool? That's ridiculous.

  4. janiek13 profile image80
    janiek13posted 4 years ago

    I think it was barbaric and not necessary. I believe that the Copenhagen Zoo should be shut down and their animals transferred to more humane zoos. If I had my way, the people that decided that Marius was "surplus" would be considered "surplus" humans and treated accordingly.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, janiek13

    2. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I wonder how many people find this absolutely repulsive but eat meat?  How many find this so disturbing, but adamantly support human babies being killed by being ripped apart in their mother's womb or stabbed through neck at birth?

  5. savvydating profile image95
    savvydatingposted 4 years ago

    And they felt compelled to dissect him and feed him to lions, in front of everyone, because why??  Maybe that's how things are done in zoos, but it sounds horrible. The poor thing was healthy, for crying out loud. Well, this is my emotional reaction, but I can't help but feel sadness.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Me too, savvydating. Thanks for sharing.

  6. junkseller profile image83
    junksellerposted 4 years ago

    Many people I think don't really want to see the reality of the world. They want to go to zoos, take cute pictures, eat their cotton candy, and go home to their cozy homes. They don't want to see behind the scenes. They don't want to see that euthanasia is a component of many such animal operations.

    People want to go to grocery stores and buy their cellophane wrapped pork loins and act like it just magically appeared there. They don't want to see the actual horrible slaughter that was required to make it happen.

    People want to chirp away on their computers and not think at all about the environmental degradation (and necessary accompanying death of life) that results from acquiring resources and producing energy so that they can do so.

    People like fake plastic cute crap. Give them a peek behind the curtain however and they lose their minds. That isn't an indictment of the people behind the curtain, it is an indictment of us, who happily go about life pretending the curtain isn't there.

    Also let's not forget that many zoos exist partly, or wholly, to maintain animal populations because we, the general population, are unable to do so ourselves. For people to complain about how the professionals do that job for us, when we couldn't do it ourselves, seems pretty hypocritical to me.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      junkseller, you do make a valid point. But most people wouldn't euthanize their dog in order to control the dog population when they could just as easily have it neutered.

    2. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, but wouldn't the purpose of a Zoo to be mostly educational, to teach ppl about animals they wouldn't otherwise see or know about? showing the anatomy of a giraffe or how lions actually get the meat off the carcass would be educational

    3. junkseller profile image83
      junksellerposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      bethperry, people might not, but shelters do all the time (estimated to be in the millions per year). It's a terrible reality organizations who manage animals often face.

      m.h., education, absolutely, which is intertwined with conservation.

    4. Ranzi profile image80
      Ranziposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Perfectly expressed. People call themselves animal lovers yet turn a blind eye on cruelty that goes on behind factory farming. Perhaps the truth will spoil their dinners.All living creatures r equal they feel pain, joy, sadness, loneliness, pleasure

  7. janshares profile image94
    jansharesposted 4 years ago

    I found this shocking as well. I happened to see the story on CNN today. They interviewed the head of the zoo and explained why they did what they did. Brace yourself. First of all, they didn't euthanize the poor giraffe with a needle. They shot him in the back of the head. Oh, but first they gave him something to eat to distract him so he wouldn't know what was happening. They called this humane. But wait. It gets worse. The reason the shot him in the head was to preserve the meat to feed the lions. The chemicals in the needle would render the meat no good. The reason to serve the meat to the lions is that it's the most expedient way to get rid of the giraffe carcus which is too large for the space and too much work to discard. He also stated that they invited the children and parents to witness the event (minus the shot in the head) for educational purposes. Really? Ugh.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      janshares, just what the world needs, huh? Children being educated in the art of callousness. Thanks for sharing!

    2. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Do you eat meat? Cows and pigs are shot through the head everyday so that we can eat their meat.  Giraffes in nature die at the jaws of lions. We must recognize that our disgust stems from our being so far removed from the process in our own lives.

    3. janshares profile image94
      jansharesposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Point well-taken, modern housewife. After reading Melissa A Smith's hub, I see the bigger picture.

    4. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      modern housewife, this is true. But I think making a spectacle out of it is part of what bothers ppl. I was taught to honor the animal we take as meat, but not use the killing as an arena event.

    5. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Bethperry, Good point!  Killing/dissection for entertainment us not okay. But what about for educational purposes?  Could the case be made that the intent was educational in nature? Not unlike a biology class dissecting a cat, which mine did?

    6. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      modern housewife, yes, I'm sure that case could be made. If this is the case, what a contradiction of educational purposes in their decision to use a healthy giraffe. In the wild, lions tend to pick off the weakest and sickliest.

  8. old albion profile image72
    old albionposted 4 years ago

    Disgraceful all round. Someone has already made my point. A Zoo here in Britain offered a home to no avail. Perhaps it was a quick and easy way to provide cheap 'fresh' meat for the Lions.
    A very sad reflection on life as it really is.
    Graham.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, old albion. I think you may be right on target with that theory.

  9. jamieedwards1 profile image63
    jamieedwards1posted 4 years ago

    I would agree. Not only have they slaughtered an amazing animal, but they chose to do so in front of school children? Complete madness! Could have just given the giraffe to another zoo!

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes indeed.

  10. Melissa A Smith profile image97
    Melissa A Smithposted 4 years ago

    I just created a hub on the subject. I have no problem with euthanizing an animal if no suitable home can be found for it, but it's clear that good candidates were available, and offers were refused for trivial reasons that I go into more detail with in my article. The zoo claims to be conservation minded, but the reality is that most of the animals in the collection are not valuable for future introduction programs. The giraffes in question are not even endangered at all, begging the question of why they're there in the first place if the zoo claims to only propagate the animal for essential breeding programs.
    There is nothing horrendous about killing a giraffe with the described method, as the same occurs with the millions of animals we use for food each day. I just feel the giraffe could have been more valuable to us alive.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Melissa, great Hub.

    2. Melissa A Smith profile image97
      Melissa A Smithposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks

  11. modern housewife profile image91
    modern housewifeposted 4 years ago

    Well, my answer may seem cruel, but....
    While I am sad for the loss of life, I actually don't have a problem with this.  Animals are killed everyday for food, or euthanized to be used as teaching tools. 

    Up until the 1900s most families raised animals or hunted animals for the food they would provide.  The were not brutal, hard hearted people.  They valued the life of the animal, killed only out of need, and were thankful for the animal's life and for the nourishment it would provide through its death.  Children were taught how to hunt, and how to process the animal after its death, first by watching the process, and then as they grew, by helping.  They were not shielded from death.  It was a natural part of life.   
     
    Since the 1900's we have become increasingly removed from and uncomfortable with from the natural cycle of life and death.  Today, we eat more meat than ever before, but we are completely removed from the process.  We buy already processed meat from the store and then complain about people who hunt or slaughter animals for food. We feed out children hambugers and pork chops, but are afraid they can't handle knowing where it really comes from.  We killed thousands of chickens, cows and pigs every day for consumption, but become distraught at the thought of a giraffe being euthanized, and its body being used as a teaching tool and to feed other animals.  We are completely comfortable giving caged lions meat, but are distraught at the thought of them eating the meat off an already dead animal. 

    I include myself in the description of society above.  I have never killed an animal, other than an insect, and I don't really want to watch it happen.  I hate the idea of animals in the wild hunting and eating each other.  I am uncomfortable with death.  But I recognize where these feelings come from and that I must accept death as a natural part of life. I try to be mindful that the meat I eat came from an animal who gave its life to nourish my family. 

    As a Christian, I believe that all life should be respected, but I also believe that God has permitted the killing of animals for food and other uses. We shouldn't take any life for granted, but this cycle is part of the natural world in which we live.

    1. Melissa A Smith profile image97
      Melissa A Smithposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      It's rather unfair that your comment got voted down.

    2. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I agree that your comment, although offensive to some, shows a lot of thought  and truth.  If people had to kill what they eat, it would change quite a few mind-sets. Respect for life is key, even when hunting, as we are designed to be predators..

    3. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks guys! I Appreciate that!

    4. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      There is a difference between personally killing the animal you are to eat, and butchery for the sake of butchery. No predators other than humans kill for the pure spectacle of it.

    5. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I would never condone senseless slaughter of ANYTHING!  Anyone who kills for spectacle is evil & w/o conscious. Marius comes down to  animal-type eugenics: purely& simply wrong!!

    6. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Giraffes are a natural food source for lions. It was killed and used to feed lions their natural diet. I don't really see the difference between killing a giraffe or a cow to feed the lions.

    7. cat on a soapbox profile image96
      cat on a soapboxposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Killing Marius because he didn't suit the gene pool any longer was wrong. Feeding him to the lions was not; however, it shouldn't have been done as a public spectacle.

    8. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, cat on a soapbox, well said.

  12. profile image0
    dragonflycolorposted 4 years ago

    I'm upset and disgusted by the parents who allowed their children to view this act.  Is it a wonder why some children grow up to be criminals?  It is a disgusting act to mutilate this baby in front of everyone and call it educational.  To a biologist it might have been educational, but a child, it was traumatizing.  The zoo should be penalized for their careless and inconsiderate act.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, dragonflycolor.

  13. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
    Patty Inglish, MSposted 4 years ago

    The hero who saved the Columbus Zoo spoke out on local Columbus news radio about Marius the Giraffe. read more

  14. JayeWisdom profile image92
    JayeWisdomposted 4 years ago

    I don't believe it was "necessary" because if they didn't want to keep the giraffe they could have given him to another zoo or a sanctuary for former zoo animals. I've read news accounts about this horrendous, monstrous action, and zoo staff have received death threats because of it.  People around the world who care about animals consider this killing an atrocity and do not accept the zoo officials' rationale for their actions.

    While I find the decision by the zoo's staff to slaughter Marius abhorent, inhumane, cruel and barbaric, I find it equally difficult to conceive of parents who would allow their children to witness such an atrocity--the killing, dismemberment and feeding of this beautiful animal to the lions. The vet's excuse that it was done with witnesses "...for educational purposes" is insane. What is educational about murder?

    In disgust,
    Jaye

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      JayeWisdom, I think some use the "educational" angle to excuse their general lack of of empathy for animals. The same excuse was used in other times to excuse sadistic practices and spectator events.

  15. SpaceShanty profile image95
    SpaceShantyposted 4 years ago

    A rather poorly thought out Publicity stunt? smile

  16. Alphadogg16 profile image92
    Alphadogg16posted 4 years ago

    Wow..... I hadn't seen this story, I can't believe that this actually took place. I would think there would be some kind of laws in place even though the giraffe is not an endangered species. Really a shame.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Definitely!

  17. FatFreddysCat profile image99
    FatFreddysCatposted 4 years ago

    I thought it was awful. Especially since several other zoos had apparently offered to take Marius off of their hands if Copenhagen didn't have a place for him, so euthanizing him was completely unnecessary.
    It's also rather bizarre that they would cut him up and feed him to the lions in front of a group of school children. What was the point of that "lesson?" I bet some of those kids will be telling their therapist about that for years to come.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Well said, FatFreddysCat.

  18. erorantes profile image53
    erorantesposted 4 years ago

    It  is sad. It is better to release him to the wildlife were they supposed to be. It is savage what they did. Sooner or later carma comes around. God forgive them. They did not know what they were doing.

  19. cat on a soapbox profile image96
    cat on a soapboxposted 4 years ago

    This story makes me so sad! This perfectly healthy young giraffe should have been sent to another zoo. Since he was raised in captivity, releasing him into the wild was not a viable option. I disapprove of eugenics on any level. Shame on these people.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, cat on a soapbox!

  20. definitions profile image59
    definitionsposted 4 years ago

    I wish Marius could dissect the spectators and his killers instead.

    1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks. Many people are very angry about this.

  21. profile image0
    Lybrahposted 4 years ago

    Poor giraffe!  He did not deserve that.  Although it probably made a good science lesson for the children.

  22. Theophanes profile image98
    Theophanesposted 4 years ago

    Just makes me wonder who had it out to get this giraffe? NORMALLY a zoo with an excess animal like a giraffe will sell said animal to another zoo that needs it - and they can make a lot of cash in the process - so whhhy this giraffe was publicly euthanized is beyond me. He must have seriously pissed someone off.

    1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      On 2-14-2014, it was announced on radio that the next smaller giraffe in the group is to be killed and fed to the lions soon because he is taking up space..

  23. Ranzi profile image80
    Ranziposted 4 years ago

    Marius - this adorable creature with harmless eyes has caused much public outrage everywhere. More than 27,000 signatures ended up on a petition in order to save him just prior to his death. The mistreatment. The cruelty. To imagine that a healthy... read more

  24. Ranzi profile image80
    Ranziposted 4 years ago
  25. Alastar Packer profile image84
    Alastar Packerposted 4 years ago

    I've had first hand knowledge of the Danish people as friends, and a good dose of their culture as well. In my opinion they are amongst the brightest and friendliest  people in the world. This unfortunate action with Marius the boy giraffe bodes bad for the world. However, the majority response from around the planet might seem to offer some hope that this was not the right way after all - and a lesson is learned.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Alastar, very true about the Danes & culture. I don't think this incident is a reflection on the Danes in general, at least it shouldn't be taken as such. You're also right about the worldwide response.

  26. profile image54
    tbHistorianposted 4 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/8743133_f260.jpg

    I consider this a normal process within the circle of life.  Many cows, pigs, chickens, rabbits, buffalo, deer, moose, snakes, dogs, etc. are killed daily to support consumption desires of humans. 
    Therefore, unless the people who choose to declare these slaughters inhumane, barbaric, etc. the zoo action should be considered within the boundaries of them.

    1. modern housewife profile image91
      modern housewifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly!

    2. Ranzi profile image80
      Ranziposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Great point..

  27. Ranzi profile image80
    Ranziposted 4 years ago

    People call themselves animal lovers yet turn a blind eye on cruelty that goes on behind factory farming.  Perhaps the truth will spoil their dinners. Selective animals loving and speciesism proves how messed up society really is.
    Just because it's a cute Giraffe doesn't make it anymore special than other living creatures. All living creatures are equal - they feel pain, joy, sadness, loneliness, boredom pleasure. Many have tears streaming down their faces as they are slit and killed.

    Perhaps next time when we are outraged by a giraffe being quickly shot, we should think about the holocaust that is happening to animals right now. Think about how billions of pigs worldwide are forced into a tiny body fit cage for one whole year (they cant even turn sideways) or how baby calves are stolen from their mothers and tortured so they can stay tender for our dinner, or about the foxes that get skinned alive.

    Yes I'm may sound like a loony extremist - but rape, slavery and pedophilia seemed okay not long ago until people spoke out

  28. brutishspoon profile image67
    brutishspoonposted 4 years ago

    It is disgusting that a Zoo that is supposed to help save animal species would do something like this. An animal that is healthy should be allowed to live out its natural life. If he did not fit into their breading program could he have fitted in at another zoo. Did they even check that option out?

    1. Patty Inglish, MS profile image93
      Patty Inglish, MSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      News reports were that the officials of Copenhagen Zoo said giving or selling Marius elsewhere was against laws/regulations. That is completely different from rules in America and Australia.

  29. jarcade92 profile image59
    jarcade92posted 4 years ago

    i know it was intended as an educational thing for kids but i think it was a horrible thing too do, id like too think our zoo would bury our giraffe out of respect and not feed it to the lions like in the wild because zoo animals arent in the wild and are different if you know what i mean

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Absolutely!

  30. thomasczech profile image66
    thomasczechposted 4 years ago

    This was a despicable act. There was absolutely no reason for this animal to be killed, they could have sent it to a nature reserve or a zoo somewhere else.

  31. profile image0
    swilliamsposted 4 years ago

    What a disturbing image. I believe we were put on this earth to protect animals. To see such a beautiful creature being mistreated paints a sad reflection on behalf of mankind.

  32. profile image0
    Bronwyn Hansenposted 4 years ago

    This disgraceful event made the evening news here in Australia. It also made me ashamed of my Danish heritage. How anyone could do this to such a healthy animal is beyond me.
    If I posted what I would like to do to the zoologists responsible, I would be banned from HP for life.

  33. profile image50
    debbyhposted 4 years ago

    While the Copenhagen Zoo might had considered this to be a necessary measure, better options could had been considered for this healthy 18 month giraffe. According to USA Today News, " no other accredited zoo in Europe could take him in" (Lee). However, the possibility of other solutions such as separating this male giraffe from female giraffes should had been considered. In addition, perhaps exchanging with another  zoo in other countries could had been a good investment for both sides, and a better solution to the problem. In any case, if NO zoo was willing to negotiate, then why not bring it back to its original wild life? a zoo should not take in more animals than it can care for. "Care for" is that NOT what a zoo is supposed to be? A place were animals are Safe and are "cared for" by professionals? Which leads to my next point, publicly humiliating and disrespecting the corpse was unprofessional. 

    The "scene" made by the zoo with the giraffe's body is disgraceful. Dissecting and feeding the body  to another animal in public for the purpose of "show" (not even science) was cruel and unnecessary. Sure, the cycle of life in the animal kingdom is naturally barbaric to look at, However, being done by a human being WITHOUT the use of the normal cycle of life was simply cold and unusual.

    1. bethperry profile image92
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Excellent observations, debbyh!

  34. Penny G profile image70
    Penny Gposted 4 years ago

    Oh my gosh, horrid. They could have given him to another zoo, who did not feel this way. I am shocked! Sad!

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)