What do you consider as an "ideal" number of children to raise?

Jump to Last Post 1-8 of 8 discussions (20 posts)
  1. Jeremy Gill profile image94
    Jeremy Gillposted 3 years ago

    What do you consider as an "ideal" number of children to raise?

  2. freecampingaussie profile image60
    freecampingaussieposted 3 years ago

    At least 2-3 children is ideal as they grow up learning to share & socialize with each other and they are a joy to spend time with whatever the age ! I loved having 3 daughters and was one of 4 myself which was awesome ! When older there is more help in looking after parents .
    I have met only children that are more selfish as they are more spoilt with having everything to themselves as well as being lonely .

    1. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Only children do share & are raised to share. Being an only child was awesome.You're adhering to baseless, even atavistic stereotypes regarding only children. I know people w/siblings who are selfish & refuse to share because they're forced t

    2. Jeremy Gill profile image94
      Jeremy Gillposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Grace, I agree that only children are by no means selfish, at least not in my experience. I have met some who did feel lonely, and wished they had someone near their age in the house to play with. Regardless, as always, thanks for your input.

    3. freecampingaussie profile image60
      freecampingaussieposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree not all are selfish of course. I have met some that are as well as children from bigger families. That is not why I wanted more than 1 tho. It is because I loved having sisters + a brother & wanted my girls to enjoy the same life .

  3. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12180721_f260.jpg

    Good morning Mr. Gill yet we meet again. To answer the question, 1-4 children are the ideal amount of children to raise effectively. In small (1-2 children) & medium(3-4 children) sized families, parents have the time to devote individualized attention, care & love to their children. They do not have to stretch themselves emotionally, mentally, & psychologically in order to interact w/their children. Such children have the monetary advantages beyond the basic rudiments such as education & medical/health care.

    Small families fare the best as parents have the greatest access to their children. They have more time to devote to each child. There's more monies allotted to each child. Because of this, such children have better quality of nutrition, medical/health care, & education. They don't have to vie w/each other for parental attention. Parents also have the most span of control-oldest children aren't enforced to raise younger siblings.

    Medium sized families fare good.Despite the family being larger, parents are able to give their children individualized attention, care, & love. Such children have to vie for parental attention but there's enough parental involvement. Monies mayn't be stretched so far but children still receive good nutrition, medical/health care, & education. Parents have a decent span of control in many cases-oldest children aren't forced to be parents to their younger siblings.

    Medium large(5 children),large,& very large families(6 & more children) fare poorly.By the sheer number of children, parents can't give their children individualized attention, care, & love. Children have to raise themselves & each other.  Monies are stretched to the limit, even for the rudiments. It's normal for children in such families to do w/o, even the necessities. Impoverishment is normative for such families. Such children have poor nutrition, little or no medical/health care, & poor quality of education as parents can't afford to send such children to quality schools. The typical large & very large family receives outside aid &/or assistance to stay socioeconomically afloat. Parents have little or no span of control. It is very common for oldest children to raise & parent younger siblings. Parentified children are very commonplace in medium large & especially large & very large families.

    1. Jeremy Gill profile image94
      Jeremy Gillposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree; it seems having numerous children must eventually limit the time you can spend with each of them. Still, larger families can still be very loving and functional groups. I'll probably shoot for 2-3 children myself. Thanks for your input.

    2. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Not really Children from large families aren't close w/their parents like children from small & medium families are.They don't have the opportunities that the latter have In large families,some are ignored while others aren't!Wouldn't wish it at

  4. Shades-of-truth profile image89
    Shades-of-truthposted 3 years ago

    My answer is most likely not one you were seeking, but I believe the ideal number of children to raise, is how many you have! I gave birth to 8 of them, and thoroughly enjoyed raising each and every one of them.

    They learned about selflessness at an early age, and always had plenty of other children around to play with.

    My oldest son and his wife have 7, and one on the way. No one feels neglected.

    All of my children knew how to do chores, and change diapers on their younger siblings, and consider other people's feelings and belongings.

    It was challenging, but it was wonderful!

    1. Jeremy Gill profile image94
      Jeremy Gillposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I'll welcome any input, thanks for sharing your story!
      I do feel that larger families (like my own) have more trouble devoting time to each child individually, but being part of a group definitely has its own perks, too.

  5. Aime F profile image83
    Aime Fposted 3 years ago

    I think that depends a lot on the people who are doing the raising, and their children.

    I have friends who are strictly "one and done" and they've known it since before they even had their child. They know that with their lifestyle, and the way the envision their lives unfolding, they only want one kid.

    I was an only child and based on my experience I would ideally have 2 kids. I want my daughter to have a sibling. My husband and his sister are very close now as adults, and I want that for my daughter. I don't think I'd want more than 2, though I suppose I won't know that until the second one is here! I would be open to 3, but definitely no more than that.

    My mom is one of 7 and they're all extremely close. My grandma was an amazing mother and thrived with several children.

    Every couple/family is different. There are also situations where people have a child with special needs and while they may want 10+ children, having only one is "ideal".

    1. Jeremy Gill profile image94
      Jeremy Gillposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I appreciate your input, Aime. I wasn't an only child, but I don't think I would have liked to have been one; having many brothers meant I could always play (and admittedly fight) with someone. I agree; I'm probably shooting for 2-3 kids.

    2. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A+!

  6. peachpurple profile image83
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    Two, having two i am busy enough that i don't have my own personal time

    1. Jeremy Gill profile image94
      Jeremy Gillposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Very understandable, Peach. Children are blessings, but they require a huge amount of time and finances. I have deep respect for parents who give their all for their kids.

    2. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Peachy seems to be an excellent & involved mother. God bless!

  7. JennyDelToro profile image60
    JennyDelToroposted 3 years ago

    For me, it's one. But lately I've been feeling that my son might grow up feeling kind of lonely, so I've been thinking about maybe trying to adopt.

    1. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Only does not have to mean lonely.Not at all. Arrange play dates for your son. Get him involved in activities. Have him be close to his cousins  Only children can find companionship thru friends & cousins. One doesn't need siblings for companions

  8. monia saad profile image75
    monia saadposted 3 years ago

    I think that the presence of two children is good. The presence of the child alone may cause him psychological problems and is also very spoiled. And the presence of more than two children consume a lot of the health of the mother and father as well as a lot of money

    1. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Only children aren't spoiled and problematic children.  That is an old myth.  Only children are well adjusted, mature, high achievers, & highly resourceful children.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)