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What was the VERY BEST thing that your mother has said to YOU?

  1. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 22 months ago

    What was the VERY BEST thing that your mother has said to YOU?

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  2. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 22 months ago

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    "Life is not fair!"
    As a child when I use to complain about someone getting preferential treatment or getting away with something my mother would utter:
    "Life is not fair!"
    Essentially she was telling me to "get over it and move on."
    Once it really sank in for me I did notice I spent less time dwelling on things that were out of my control and more time on those things that were. Whatever is your focus is what you tend to see.
    In order to "move on" you have to be willing to "let go".
    Keeping track of every slight, betrayal, disappointment in others, how the government is functioning and so forth might give a person a little relief to blow off steam on HP or "talk radio" but it rarely leads to a "solution". Sometimes you have to (look for happiness).
    Intelligence is the ability of an organism to adapt to it's environment.
    Life is a (personal) journey.
    It's also easier when one chooses to stay in their own lane.

    1. WordCrafter09 profile image77
      WordCrafter09posted 22 months agoin reply to this

      I'm all for everyone staying in their own lane, staying out of the way of those in another lane, and generally keeping their two eyes on where THEY are going (maybe even where THEY have been),  and opining on their OWN, not others') direction/speed.

  3. WordCrafter09 profile image77
    WordCrafter09posted 22 months ago

    In this era of parenting classes, books, "stewing", competing, and whatever else has gone on with parents over the last few decades (and it's not to suggest that I don't think people should REALLY make it a point to gain a solid and sound understanding not just of child development, but of human nature and growth); but the one thing that I think of (well, there's two, but this one is, I think, the most memorable and more important).

    That is something she said once I was of an age when thinking/talking about being a mother was going on.   She'd talk about how "the young mothers these days" do all kinds of reading on how to parent; ;and while, on the one hand, she, herself, had a couple of child health/child care books on hand, but on the other didn't think much of Benjamin Spock (for a number of reasons), she'd say, "When I had my babies I just knew I wanted them and was ready to have them, and I just took them home, loved them, took good care of them, and told them right from wrong when the time came."  Then she'd add, "...and that was it."

    It was a different time (fifties in my case) (baby seats hooked over the back of a front, bench, seat in the car; baby formula made by hand with evaporated milk, Karo syrup, and sterilizing equipment).  Also, there were some relatively minor things that I think she could have understood better (but I don't see a whole lot of today's parents seeming to understand some of those things very well either.

    For the most part, though, the points she made when she'd say what I mentioned above (and I think the fact that my two siblings and I are spaced four-and-half and five years apart, so there was no real vying for attention among preschoolers/babies) kind of really ARE "It".

    Nobody asked, but that second thing that sticks is my mind is she'd so often say, "You have a good, clear, head.  Don't do do anything to muck it up" (this was as the 1960's kicked in, needless to say maybe).  I'm fairly certain her approach from "Day 1" (again, within the context of time it was, rather than today) was enough to make me value my "good, clear, head" and vow not to "muck it up" (if I could help it) with one kind of cr*p or another (and all "cr*p" is not necessarily drugs or other substances).

  4. chuckandus6 profile image76
    chuckandus6posted 22 months ago

    She told me to enjoy when the kids are young, and not worry so much about making messes because they will grow up quickly and I have always taken that advice..we make messes and I try to make each day for them special in some way.
    also she would always say that everything  happens for a reason, good or bad and it opens up a new door.

  5. threekeys profile image81
    threekeysposted 22 months ago

    "Turn the other cheek"-was her advice.
    Sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't.

 
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