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jump to last post 1-14 of 14 discussions (14 posts)

How can I cook a sirloin steak and have it turn out like a high priced steak at

  1. Michael Willis profile image77
    Michael Willisposted 8 years ago

    How can I cook a sirloin steak and have it turn out like a high priced steak at a restaurant?

    I have bought sirloin steaks at many different grocery stores and meat markets, but they always end up tough. And I do not over cook them. What is the secret to this? Is it the quality or something that is done to the meat? The way it is cooked?
    Is their a professional chef here that can give away the secret?

    The best sirloin steak I have ever eaten was at a restaurant called Culpeppers in Texas. All was needed was a butter knife and a fork. Juicy and awesome. Now I want to cook a steak the same way.

  2. Delaney Boling profile image64
    Delaney Bolingposted 8 years ago

    Hey Michael!
    I too have eaten at CullPepper's and yes, their steaks are incredible! There are a few things to take into consideration when attempting that "perfect" steak though. First, CullPepper's (and many other great steak-houses) use only USDA Prime cuts of beef. Unfortunately, many grocery butchers don't carry Prime quality meats because it's so much more expensive and customers don't buy it fast enough. I would recommend ditching the grocery store and finding a quality butcher in your area to purchase your meats first and foremost. If they don't carry Prime (or at least Choice), move on to the next one. Now that you've found a supplier for some good quality meats, here's the best way to cook them. If you're using a grill, Have a hot side and a cool side. That means that you'll want to put all your hot coals to one side. Sear the cuts of beef over the hot side firat, then move to the cooler side to finish. What this does is to quickly sear in the juices so that they don't drip out during the remaining cooking process. Finish on the cooler side to avoid burning the outside of the cut. As you cook though, baste with butter and season with salt and freshly cracked pepper. It's important to avoid flare-ups so make sure you're not cooking directly over the coals when basting with the butter. After you remove it from the grill, make sure to let it "rest" for at least 3 minutes. What this does is allow the heated outside protiens to tighten back up and lock in the juices. Simply placing your steak on a cutting board for a few minutes before cutting into it makes all the difference in the world! Follow these tips and I'm sure your next BBQ will be a success! Be sure to check out my hubs on BBQing for the best spice rub and BBQ sauce you'll ever have! Good luck and good grilling...

  3. Springboard profile image80
    Springboardposted 8 years ago

    The first thing is to find a speciality meat store that sells an awesome, Angus steak. Here in my own town we have a store called Rupena's. You can buy a sirloin steak for about $6 a lb that is the juiciest, most tender steak you could ever buy, definitely restaurant style. Their sirloin steaks are so good they actually do themselves an injustice in that there's no need to buy a higher priced piece of meat.

    It's a Milwaukee thing, but if you're intersted you can see their website at http://www.rupenas.com

  4. Michael Willis profile image77
    Michael Willisposted 8 years ago

    Both of your answers sound great. Definitely need to find a good butcher then. Price is no concern when having a great piece of meat to cook. I enjoy cooking and want to expand my skills even more than I have already.

  5. profile image0
    loriamooreposted 8 years ago

    Have you tried a cut of meat referred to as a Flat Iron steak?

    We just sprinkle some zesty seasoning like Mrs. Dash and some generic rub and use olive oil, then grill them approximately 8 minutes on each side (we like ours medium to medium well).

    It turns out flavorful and juicy every time.  It's a great cut of steak and never fails to please.

    Where I live, we get them at a grocery chain named Kroger.

  6. kascos profile image54
    kascosposted 8 years ago

    Use the meat therm and touch test and always let the meat rest
    Meat them at 135 is rare.. let rest for 10 min.
    Cut is important.Buy your steak in a butcher or  pork store like an itailian market butcher.Ask what cut they recomend.Rib eye is tender (not my favorite)

  7. profile image59
    chris elliotposted 8 years ago

    Definitely purchase Choice or Prime meat.  New York strip sirloin is the most flavorful.  Filet Mignon or tenderloin is the most tender.  Rib steak or Delmonico is flavorful and juicy, but sometimes if you get the cut off the wrong end of the rib, you will be wondering why it is so fatty.  They are all good on the grill but you should be careful of flareups, especiallly with rib steaks or Delmonicos.  By the way, the T bone and portehouse are just sirloin and filet on the bone, with the tenderloin side slightly larger on a porterhouse.                                                                                           I find that allowing my steaks  to rest in olive oil ,salt, and pepper for about 20 minutes helps achieve a moister steak.  I do whole pork tenderloins this way too and have great luck at a more reasonable price.  Beef is still my favorite.  I usually cook two for me and one each for the rest of the family.  Only a matter of time till that cardiac shows up.   Good luck in Texas.

  8. Obscurely Diverse profile image58
    Obscurely Diverseposted 8 years ago

    Stab the steak thoroughly with a fork on both sides, then marinate it in a solution that consists of half Italian Dressing, half Worcestershire sauce - for a period of 3 to 6 hours.  The vinegar in the solution with not only tenderize the meat, it will cut down on cooking time.  Plus, those two marinating liquids will add a great deal of flavor.
    Pan-fry to medium-rare (or to desired doneness), add the salt (I prefer seasoned salt) & black pepper, and ya got yourself a good budget sirloin without the toughness.  Personally, I prefer Rib-Eye, but they are quite expensive, nowadays...

  9. Susana S profile image97
    Susana Sposted 8 years ago

    My dad happens to be a steak chef and this is what he told me about cooking steak since I could never seem to get it right!

    First off you need meat that is well aged - it needs to be aged at the very least for 21 days and the longer the better. So ask your butcher about how long the meat is aged for. (Dad says the meat they use in the restaurant he works in is aged for around 6 months and the steaks they have are always top notch.)

    Secondly, always allow the meat to get to room temperature before you cook it. I always leave mine out of the fridge at least 2-3 hours before cooking. This allows the muscle to relax fully and it will be very tender once cooked.

    Hope this helps!

  10. TToni9 profile image60
    TToni9posted 8 years ago

    My answer is a little late but....you could follow my favorite way by first letting your frying pan to heat up(med-high) for about two minutes.  Slap your steak into the pan and sear the first side for about five minutes---do not be tempted to turn heat down it is meant to snap/pop/sizzle.    Let it get black on one side and repeat on second side for five minutes. You should hear pops and slight whistles---this is what you want. Next, turn the heat to med-low, flip your steak to the first side cooked and let cook on med-low for about twenty minutes unless it continues to pop or sizzle then you need to lower the tempurature slightly until you cannot hear the sizzle.Repeat on back side. Continue this until you are sure it's cooked to your preference then remove steak from pan.  Bring heat back up to med-high for 2 minutes.  Slap 1tblspoon margerine/butter into the pan ---should pop and sizzle like the steak.  When it is sizzling lower heat to med-low and slap the steak back into the pan. 5-10 minutes on each side(you can add spices/olive oil/pepper) and with a fork swirl the steak around in the melted "au ju".Should hear snaps/crackles during this time.  Turn your stovetop off and enjoy!  This has been my tasty recipe since my children were young and I swear by it now.  Hope this helps.  TToni9/Pauline MoreauNava   icanhazcheezburger/triond/facebook/my space/hubpages/authspot/frogpond reviews/whosthebigdog/sendearnings/

  11. profile image53
    SpaceAgeposted 8 years ago

    sure. use a steamer........................................

  12. dawnM profile image64
    dawnMposted 8 years ago

    One secret that I know of is tenderising the meat before you grill it.  Take kosher salt and generously salt both sides of the meat and let it sit for about ten minutes.  Then take the meat and wash all of the salt off.  Season and grill!!  remember when you go to season don't add salt back in or the meat will be too salty.  A great dry season is to mix crushed garlic, paprika, a little cumin and some crushed black pepper.  Enjoy!!

  13. stefanp profile image57
    stefanpposted 8 years ago

    Rub steak with a little olive oil. Season both sides of your steak liberally with salt, pepper and a hint of granulated garlic. Make sure your grill is screaming hot on one side and fairly cool on the other. Throw steak on hot grill. Sear 2 minutes. Turn 90  degrees and sear another minute or so. Flip steak over ONE TIME ONLY, and do the same thing on side two. At this point, either move your steak to a cooler location on the grill or finish in a 350 degree oven. (only if they're really thick steaks). Do not overcook. Remember your steak will continue cooking about another 5 degrees when you pull it from the heat. It is hugely important to let your steak rest before serving. 10 minutes on the cutting board makes a huge difference on how juicy your steak is on the plate. In restaurants, that is often the amount of time it takes to get from the grill station to the table.

  14. profile image61
    truparad0xposted 7 years ago

    I've been using a method I saw on Alton Brown's Good Eats.  He uses a cast iron skillet, but I use a Calphalon pan that can withstand 500 degrees.  I preheat the oven to 500.  Sometimes I throw the pan in there too.  I salt and pepper my steak.  Turn a range on to medium high.  Put steak on pan and sear for 30 seconds on the range.  Flip and sear other side for 30 seconds.  Then I throw it in the oven for two minutes.  I flip one more time and cook for another two minutes.  Steak would rest for about 5 minutes.  This would cook it to about medium rare.  Remember to use a towel or an oven mitt on the pan handle!

 
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