This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is used to quickly and efficiently deliver files such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisements has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (4 posts)

What do you find the best way to comunicate severity of CFS, FMS & CMS to Doc's

  1. C Curley profile image47
    C Curleyposted 8 years ago

    What do you find the best way to comunicate severity of CFS, FMS & CMS to Doc's & loved ones ?

    Chonic; Fatige, Fybromyalga, & Mono.
    Offten  these are conditions misunderstood or discarded . How do you think we could go about  geting the whole picture understood? 1st to the Medical feild & 2nd to loved ones?

  2. anitariley65 profile image66
    anitariley65posted 8 years ago

    My family and I communicate a lot through emails and such. A few mo.'s ago I joined several support sites for these conditions. I subscribed to Dom's page on yahoo and she sends updates from the medical field too. So when I get these updates from her I usually forward them to my family. It took about 3 emails before I was questioned from my family about "do you have this?".  And eventually found out that a couple of my siblings suffer the same symptoms. Write about your experience with this, and then invite your family to read your hub pages. Communication is the key. And as far as your physician goes, gather and print out as much information as you can and insist upon his or her testing you or sending you to someone who can. Good luck.

  3. Foxxfire profile image60
    Foxxfireposted 8 years ago

    I have struggled with FMS & CFS since I was a teenager.  I am currently 39.  I have four children.  These disorders can be very hard for small children to understand.  When my children were younger I made up a system for them to understand how mommy felt that day.  Once they learned it, they would come to me each morning and ask, "what kind of day are you having mommy?"

    The Red light, Green light system:

    Red Light Day:
    If I'm in a lot of pain and just can't be touched ( no hugs, no jumping into mommy's arm, etc.) we called it a Red Light Day.  Then they know to be careful around me.

    Green Light Day:
    If I can handle a hug or some extra play time with the kids then it's a green light day.  Then the kids know ALMOST anything goes.

    However, there are days when I feel in between. 
    Ergo, Yellow Light Day:
    This is when I'm in pain but not so much that they can't give mommy a hug or go for a short walk with them.
    5 years later... they still ask me or sometimes tell me what kind of day I'm having.  It's a cute little bond that I have with them and no-one else.

  4. delaneyworld profile image78
    delaneyworldposted 6 years ago

    Hi.  Chronic pain is difficult for those who do not experience to understand.  What I do with my doc is bring a list of my most recent symptoms and how it is specifically affecting what I do each day.  I am very specific such as:  The joint pain in my hands has reduced my ability to type on the computer.  Rather than 1 hour per day, it's down to 1/2 per day I am able to continue.  Etc, etc.  Make notes of your pain, when you are feeling it and any other factors that may be exacerbating it.  A journal is a great thing to keep track of how you are doing to show your doctor. 

    It is hard to explain to loved ones how it affects you without first, freaking them out, and second, leaving them with a feeling of helplessness.

    I would recommend looking up the Spoon Theory on www.butyoudontlooksick.com - a very smart woman wrote down this theory for a friend who didn't understand how she had a ration her energy each day depending on the amount of pain she was in.  It gave her friend a way to relate to how she was feeling.

    Also, maybe assemble a short document that outlines the conditions, symptoms and what to watch for or danger signs.  You want them informed but not too scared.  You can maybe write a quick narrative about how it makes you feel, how is affects you physically and mentally and specifically things that your loved ones could to to help!  That will give them some guidance.

    I always make sure they understand if I am unable to participate in an event of some sort, it is not personal.  It is simply I am feeling poorly and don't have the energy reserves.  Try to give them something to relate to and give them some links to sources they can look up on their own as well.

    Without them hearing about it and how it affects you, they will never understand.  Good luck and I hope you are hanging in there. 

    Warmly,

    Jen

 
working