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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (8 posts)

How many minutes daily should one use a rebounder (Mini-Trampoline) ?

  1. ii3rittles profile image82
    ii3rittlesposted 6 years ago

    How many minutes daily should one use a rebounder (Mini-Trampoline) ?

    I read a ton of info on using a rebounder for many health benefits, including weight loss and energy. My question, though, I can seem to find an answer too. I started using my rebounder today, and did about 10 minutes and felt worn out. I know I am out of shape. I instantly felt more awake, and alert however; Just felt like I did an hour work-out is all. So, how many minutes daily should I use my rebounder to get the effects of weight-loss, energy increase, healthier skin, ect.?

  2. DonnaCosmato profile image96
    DonnaCosmatoposted 6 years ago

    The American College of Sports Medicine recommends 30 minutes on as many days as possible. However, like most new fitness regimes, it will probably take you some time to build up to that level. The consistency of doing the exercise everyday in the beginning is more important than how long you do it as you are establishing the habit pattern. As it gets easier, you can add more time. I have a hub on beginner mini trampoline exercises if you would like more specific advice, but I hope this is helpful. Good luck and stay with it as the rebounder provides many health benefits to the user.

  3. MosLadder profile image85
    MosLadderposted 6 years ago

    Hi ii3rittles! If you just started using it, 10 minutes is certainly enough to wear you out, especially if you are not accustomed to non-stop bouncing/rebounding. Keep in mind, any trampoline activity is basically plyometrics and should only make up a portion of your entire workout routine. Supplement this activity with regular cardio such as biking, jogging, walking, dancing, etc. Too much emphasis on plyometrics is hard on the body, and at the least will take a long time to get used to.

  4. Bonitaanna profile image77
    Bonitaannaposted 6 years ago

    Hi, I used to be an instructor for 25 years in high impact aerobics. I also taught 3 years of aerobics on the trampoline.  I loved it.  I still have all the mini trampolines.  I have 18 of them.  I will be 70 in a year and I still plan on getting a class going somewhere.  I can still do 200 jumping jax on it and it actually is the best way to exercise.  There is no trama on the joints at all. If you can do at least 30 minutes a day, that is good.  I can still do an hours a day and I am not exhausted.  I am elated and feel like I am a foot off the floor for awhile.  If you can find the book called "The Miracles of ReBound Exercise" by Albert E. Carter, he explains the benefits a person gets by doing this.  I keep mine in the living room in front of the tv along with my gazelle.  That way it reminds me to do my exercises.  Good luck!  Happy Bouncing!

  5. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 6 years ago

    I do at least 20 minutes a day. There are many times I will do it for a solid hour or two while watching t.v. just to stay off my duff. When you are on a trampoline it absorbs the impact that your body would feel if you were doing the jumps on solid ground. It will not wear your body out like running on a treadmill or jumping/rebounding on a solid surface. I am a figure skater and have been for many years. I use the trampoline to SAVE my joints from the impact that I get when doing other forms of off-ice training and the impact they get from all of my jumping on ice (we come down with the force of up to 7 times our weight on every jump). No problems after almost 2 decades!

    Do the minimum you comfortably can daily. Even if you only do 10 or 15 minutes daily you will get some great benefits for your entire body. I can burn up to 600 calories an hour on mine by acting as if I'm jumping rope while on it or simply by speeding up the jumps. Do only what you comfortably can and recognize that you will need time to work up to doing 1/2 an hour, an hour, or more.

    1. profile image48
      VivianLiuposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What rebounder would you recommend? My 12-yr old's off-ice coach suggests getting her one to practice her jumps (she has half her doubles solidly and she's working on the other half.)

    2. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Awesome! I have a little Gold's Gym mini trampoline for indoor use. It has held up well but is now getting a bit squeaky. It was only $40 and has probably seen more than it's fair share of use so far.

  6. Andy Walsh profile image54
    Andy Walshposted 4 years ago

    Hi ii3rittles.

    Just thought I would mention the fantastic benefits on the lymphatic system that the Needak Rebounder has.

    You can check it out at http://www.needakrebounder.com

    You can find some great dvd and books for rebounding routines.

    We have a set 20 minute exercise which is a great way to get started.

    Andy

 
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