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How do you stop anxiety and panic attacks if they come out of no where for no re

  1. ii3rittles profile image81
    ii3rittlesposted 5 years ago

    How do you stop anxiety and panic attacks if they come out of no where for no reason?

    Certain things trigger them, such as freeways and being in a car in bad weather... But sometimes I am perfectly happy and BAM, they hit. What can I do to stop this? I have a fear for many things and I don't even understand why. I recently started having a bad one while in the car on the freeway, and mind you, I don't even drive. I almost had my fiance' pull off the highway. I felt dizzy, light headed, short of breath, like I was going to freak out. I was fine on the way home, however, which I don't understand.

  2. Eric Calderwood profile image83
    Eric Calderwoodposted 5 years ago

    I used to suffer terribly from intense panic attacks.  One thing that helped me greatly, was to tell myself out loud, "This is just a panic attack."  Just acknowledging it that way gave me power over it and in many cases they would start to subside immediately.  Another thing was that many of my panic attacks would come with "heart-attack" symptoms.  I did the proper thing having my heart checked out thoroughly, and then learned to tell myself, "this is not a heart attack, I've already had my heart checked out."  Again this helped.  There is a book out called "Telling Yourself the Truth," by William Backus and Marie Chapian.  I recommend it.

    1. estellaeffects profile image61
      estellaeffectsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Eric thanks for sharing. My husband is going through this. We got his heart checked it was OK. Since then he is getting these less frequently. I think he realized it is not a heart attack.

    2. ii3rittles profile image81
      ii3rittlesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Eric. I go to my beliefs first. I will bind things in Jesus' name and it does work and help me greatly, but i want to get to a place where they dont happen at all or very very rarely. I will look into that book. thank you!

  3. Spindle profile image59
    Spindleposted 5 years ago

    These sound like mine and what it turned out to be is a social anxiety panic attack.  You are fearing where you are going so on the way home you are perfectly fine. You may not realise it or understand it - I know I didn't and that is what took me the longest time, actually recognising what was happening.  You can get breathing exercises to help and like Eric says, you have to be the over riding voice inside.  Panic attacks will not kill you and actually the anxiety level can only sustain for a short period of time.  You have to let it run its course and even try and relax into it.  You have to re-train your brain.  I have a few courses of cognitive behavioural therapy and after suffering for 12 years, I finally think I am getting back the control. Good luck but remember you will conquer xXx

  4. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
    Dubuquedogtrainerposted 5 years ago

    The only treatment I am aware of for true panic attacks is medication, but I have not researched the subject. I would suggest getting a diagnosis from a knowledgeable psychiatrist who can prescribe the right medication if needed. Another thing that can help is a psychiatric service dog....see my hubs.

    1. Spindle profile image59
      Spindleposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      just medication is never the answer.  It must always be taken along with therapy of some kind.

    2. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      And your education and experience for this assertion is what? While this is true in general, it is not necessarily true for true "panic attacks" which usually occur concomitantly with other psychiatric illness which is often already being treated. Th

    3. Spindle profile image59
      Spindleposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have suffered from panic attacks for 10 years. Done both routes, one with just medication and with medication and therapy.  So have experience of both.  What is your education and experience to sweeping say only medication will work?

    4. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As I said, you can read my bio, and maybe you should re-read my answer above - I did not say that psychotherapy was not warranted, did I?

    5. Spindle profile image59
      Spindleposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      No you didn't mention psychotherapy!  Unsure why your being rude to me and pointing me to your bio, I didn't start this conversation between us, that was u, questioning me. Not a place for arguments.  We r meant to be helping each other

    6. Dubuquedogtrainer profile image58
      Dubuquedogtrainerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I apologize for coming across as being rude. It is difficult to interpret intent from typed words sometimes. However, you initially corrected me, and I was responding as a medical professional to correct the misinformation.

  5. artist101 profile image67
    artist101posted 5 years ago

    There is usually an underlying cause of the panic attacks. Hypoglycemia, a drop in blood sugar.All refined carbs, and sugar cause an insulin spike, meaning insulin levels rise sharply, then drop out. This drop causes anxiety, and panic attacks. Proteins, and good fats, do not cause this spike. Another problem with processed food is, with over processing, the valuable nutrients have been removed. The nutrients that nourish our brains, among them are tryptophan, omega 3 fatty acids, and chromium.
    A lack of serotonin, is a contributing factor in anxiety, and panic attacks. Available thru my website. 500mg at bedtime. It is a naturally occurring amino acid in all proteins, if you are vegetarian, then you may not be getting enough amino acids. Medications do not produce serotonin, they only refire whats there. see my hub on menopause. Do not combine with St johns wart, 5htp, maoi, or an ssri, such as paxil, zoloft, or prozac.
    Another useful supplement for panic attacks is Gaba, derived from glutamine, another amino acid, found in proteins. Whole proteins will supply those, nutrients.
    A supplement containing a complete source of amino acids, might also help.

 
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