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Why are all addicts 'recovering' and not 'recovered'?

  1. Morgan Anthony profile image70
    Morgan Anthonyposted 2 years ago

    Why are all addicts 'recovering' and not 'recovered'?

    I believe that addiction can be cured, and I am bothered by the notion that all alcoholics/addicts  are only ever 'recovering'. This kind of language itself promotes the stigma/stereotypes that addicts are forever. What are your thoughts on this?

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  2. cam8510 profile image96
    cam8510posted 2 years ago

    I'll speak only for myself as I answer your question.  I consider my addiction to alcohol to be an incurable disease.  Some disagree with that assessment of alcoholism, but it works for me.  If I ever considered myself to be "cured," I might go out and try drinking again.  Well, I did try that two times in my past.  Guess what?  I hadn't been cured.  Each time, with the first drink, my life went into a new tailspin. 

    This is why I do not consider my latest six year, seven month and three day period of sobriety to be evidence that I have been cured. 

    To me, it is an incurable, but treatable disease.

    1. Yesyoucan2015 profile image44
      Yesyoucan2015posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I was heavily addicted to drugs and alcohol for 15 years. I have been clean and sober for 11 years now and my life has radically changed. I personally do believe a person can fully recover and see permanent lasting change.

    2. cam8510 profile image96
      cam8510posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      One of the things I've learned in recovery is to speak only for myself. I can't say what another might experience. I began my last comment with "I'll speak only for myself."  You have found "permanent lasting change," and I am delighted to hear it.

  3. fpherj48 profile image75
    fpherj48posted 2 years ago

    Morgan......Although I've been through my share of issues & difficulties, I've not ever had to have "treatment" for any type of addiction.  I do not drink alcohol & never ventured into "drugs."
    However, I did live through every minute of this scenario with 2 loved ones.  They both adhere to the concept of being a "recovering addict."  My position having been one of support and encouragement, I kept my personal opinions to myself.  I don't approve of the attitude, "once an addict  ALWAYS as addict (which is what is believed with the concept of "recovering.")  IF this helps people and it "works" for them, who am I to say?

    I probably cannot relate because of not being through it.  The closest I could come to a comparison is perhaps being on a diet.  It's well known that if one is on a weight-loss program, you can fall off the wagon, so to speak, one day and have a huge ice cream sundae.  You must merely do your contrition the next day.   I realize this is not how it is with alcohol or drugs.  It has to do with the brain chemistry.  Then again, each and every individual is UNIQUE.  I am certain there are those who are so strong-willed that they feel quite comfortable embracing a complete cure.

    However a person arrives where they want to be and must be, is what matters and I applaud them in any case.......Peace, Paula

    1. cam8510 profile image96
      cam8510posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Paula, I appreciate your attitude on this.  It is a very individual matter.  I take a day at a time and handle opportunities I have to take another drink one at a time.  I don't have to say "never again." I just say, "Not this time." It works for me.

  4. Aelbarsha profile image87
    Aelbarshaposted 2 years ago

    In my opinion, it's very hard to recover from addiction. It won't be possible if the "presumably treated", faces the same environment again. Successful therapy should include the three major domains of health: Physical, mental , and SOCIAL health.

    1. Morgan Anthony profile image70
      Morgan Anthonyposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I personally believe addiction needs to be treated in other domains: physical, mental and SPIRITUAL.

 
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