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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (15 posts)

Why do some people solve their stressful problems through the process of stress

  1. Valerie Muganda profile image58
    Valerie Mugandaposted 11 months ago

    Why do some people solve their stressful problems through the process of stress eating?

  2. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 11 months ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/13583884_f260.jpg

    When people are stressed it's natural to do whatever they enjoy.
    Just about everyone loves to eat and food is a relatively cheap to get a hold of and can be consumed publically or in the privacy of one's own home without any stigma.
    Almost everyone can relate to being a child coming in the house after hurting them self playing and being given a cookie, slice of cake, or scoop of ice cream after their mother or whomever put a bandage on them.
    When I was a child after you sat through a dental cleaning the dentist office assistant would "reward you" with a lollypop for being good or "brave".
    From my point of view it's easier to understand why someone would link eating to {feeling good} than it would be for them to choose to (stop eating) because they're stressed.
    Being sent to bed (without dinner) is a "punishment".
    People don't eat to "solve their stressful problems" they simply want to "escape" or take their mind off them. It's the same reason why some folks turn to alcohol, drugs, and sex.
    They're simply indulging in something that temporarily gives them pleasure. Doing it consistently is what gets them in trouble.

    1. Valerie Muganda profile image58
      Valerie Mugandaposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Wow. Good answer. Totally eye-opening. Well it's better than doing drugs at the end of the day.

    2. jrk1121 profile image85
      jrk1121posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      No, there is science behind this.

      Chemicals from high-calorie sugary foods counteract the Cortisol stress creates. It's not a choice or learned behavior its nature.

      people DO in fact eat to solve their problem. It solves their chemical imbalance.

  3. jrk1121 profile image85
    jrk1121posted 11 months ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13584505_f260.jpg

    I think dashingscorpio based their theory on the fact that sugary and high-fat foods are considered "comfort foods". Chocolate bars are yummy and make us feel good. So that is a reasonable guess. It's just not a correct answer.

    Stress causes your body to release a hormone called "cortisol". Cortisol increases your appetite.


    PS, I love Golden Corral!

    1. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      "Comfort food" is whatever makes (you) feel good or comfortable.
      It can be steak, pizza, double bacon cheeseburgers, chili cheese dogs, fresh baked bread with melted butter. Whatever takes your mind off of your problems. Some eat for taste.

    2. jrk1121 profile image85
      jrk1121posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      In this context. We are speaking about high calorie high-fat sugary foods. It's not just "whatever". It's specific.

      I can't post links, look at Psychology Today: Stress and Eating

      or Harvard Health Publications: Why stress causes people to overeat

    3. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      James,
      I didn't see anything in Valerie's question that mentioned high calorie or fat.
      This is why "whatever" applies. Not everyone (enjoys) the same food or desires the same food when they're stressed.
      I didn't want to make "assumptions".

    4. jrk1121 profile image85
      jrk1121posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Scorpio, but you are making assumptions. Valerie asked a question you gave an opinion, not the answer. There is TONS of science on the subject. Creating an account to answer your own question is one thing, ignoring facts and pushing an agenda.......

    5. Valerie Muganda profile image58
      Valerie Mugandaposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Okay wow. Thanks for that scientific enlightment James. I think that your answers are both on point. It's just that Scorpio gave us a simplified answer while you gave us a scientific one. Thank you both.

    6. jrk1121 profile image85
      jrk1121posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Scorpio gave an answer that is incorrect. It's an opinion, not an answer. And it's not helpful to anyone when the facts are skewed from the beginning.

    7. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Per Valerie's comment: "Wow. Good answer."
      Yes, I gave (my opinion)on why I think (some people)stress eat. I didn't make an assumption over the type of food they ate nor stated (all people) "stress eat" because of any one thing.

    8. jrk1121 profile image85
      jrk1121posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Per Valerie's comment: "Wow. Good answer." -- Well isn't that a nice pat on the back for your-self. You can have your cookie. Valerie also assumed you knew what you were talking about....

  4. DuckHatch profile image90
    DuckHatchposted 11 months ago

    I see the point James is trying to make. Scorpio makes statements like:

    1.) would "reward you" with a lollypop for being good or "brave".
    2.) link eating to {feeling good} than it would be for them to choose to (stop eating)
    3.) bed (without dinner) is a "punishment".
    4.)simply indulging in something that temporarily gives them pleasure.

    Those statements are emotional plays, they are not true and amount to nothing more than a fluff piece. Your body craves these foods to lower the cortisol levels inside of it. Scorpio is treating the whole eating issue as if it's a learned behavior. It's not. The need to eat those "specific" foods is the body trying to regulate a chemical imbalance. It really is science and not a learned behavior.

    Scorpio is using the emotional value of sensitive issues to gain ground with the response that was given. How is it answering the question or helping anybody when the statements aren't true?

    LOl jrk1121 = dashingscorpio???

    1. Valerie Muganda profile image58
      Valerie Mugandaposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Okay thank you for that. I appreciate the honest feedback.

 
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