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jump to last post 1-12 of 12 discussions (17 posts)

Mosquito Bites

  1. annieloulaurel profile image59
    annieloulaurelposted 7 years ago

    Hi,

    I always have this problem ever since. I easily get bitten by mosquitoes, while my husband and daughter are not prone to it. What is it in me that those insects like? Does it have something to do with my blood? Please help!

    thanks,

    1. melpor profile image92
      melporposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      Annieloulaurel, mosquitoes are attracted to the odor of carbon dioxide we exhale in our breath. That is how they are able to follow and bite us. It is possible you may be emitting more carbon dioxide than your husband and daughter.

      1. yolanda yvette profile image59
        yolanda yvetteposted 7 years agoin reply to this

        Now that's interesting.  I've never heard that before.  I too seem to get bitten by mosquitoes a lot in comparison to others who may be around me.

  2. Hestia DeVoto profile image60
    Hestia DeVotoposted 7 years ago

    Scientists seem to think something about hormones is what attracts mosquitoes.  In short, they bite what smells good to them.

  3. Alice in Wonder profile image58
    Alice in Wonderposted 7 years ago

    I too have been bitten by mosquitoes while everyone else is not.  I was told B1 vitamin will help by emitting an odor to the skin that repell mosquitoes.  Has helped me when mosquitoes are in season, and that is when i take it everyday and stop when they are gone.

  4. profile image47
    snoweposted 7 years ago

    Hi,
    I think this could be on your blood problem...because as what i know that mosquito like for sweet blood...
    Do you have a high level of sugar and diabetes..this person has this condition really prompt to mosquito.

  5. profile image0
    firemanakposted 7 years ago

    in the summer time, I eat a lot more garlic than normal, and I don't seem to be bitten as much as my friends and family

  6. 2uesday profile image80
    2uesdayposted 7 years ago

    A couple of years ago I read that some people take a type of vitamin B tablets for a few weeks before travelling to make them less tasty to mossies. However do get proper information before trying this idea.

  7. IzzyM profile image88
    IzzyMposted 7 years ago

    I've written hubs on mosquitoes because I am one who gets bitten lots too.
    Best thing to do is use an insecticide spray on any exposed skin if you are planning on going out in the evening. Mosquitoes are more active at night time. In the house keep your windows shut all night, else use mosquito nets to stop them coming in.
    Eating marmite is supposed to help, and garlic as has been mentioned. I eat garlic but still get bitten (haven't tried the marmite).
    If you do get bitten, apply nail polish to the bite - it takes the itch out and seals it, allowing it to heal.

  8. brimancandy profile image78
    brimancandyposted 7 years ago

    I camp a lot in the summer months, and the bugs are terrible. I will even endure wearing long pants at night to keep them little bastards off me. There are special latterns and torch lamps that have misquito repellent in them, that usually do a pretty good job of keeping them away. They are usually pretty cheap, and you can buy them anywhere. Better ones can be found at your local garden center, but, expect to pay more for them.

    I even find that when I am camping, just building a fire will keep them at a good distance. Otherwise I wear insect repellent. They also have these things now that you wear on your wrist that are supposed to work pretty good. Always something new to try.

  9. guy1973 profile image61
    guy1973posted 7 years ago

    I hate mosquitoes and they follow me around all the time. once when i went camping one of those guys flew into my ear and got stuck in there, it was making annoying buzzing sound in my inner ear and i have to get up, out of my sleeping bag and pour water into my ear to drown it and wash it out, which i succeeded, after that i used to sleep with cotton wool in my ear.

    1. yolanda yvette profile image59
      yolanda yvetteposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I probably would've gone out of my mind if I'd had something buzzing around inside my ear.  Making my eyes water just thinking about that one.  UGH!!!

  10. profile image46
    Friendofmaddoposted 7 years ago

    It's common knowledge to locals in India that if you eat about a teaspoon of Marmite a day (enough to cover two bits of toast) it really helps with keeping the mozzies away. Bizarre I know, but true, apparently.

    1. IzzyM profile image88
      IzzyMposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      I'd heard about the Marmite (see in a post above)but not tried it. I think after reading your post, I will buy a jar next time I see them in the shops to try smile Thanks.
      PS Marmite is like Bovril, isn't it? I love Bovril.

  11. Anti-Valentine profile image95
    Anti-Valentineposted 7 years ago

    You can try the eating garlic trick - keeps the bloodsuckers away.

    But other than that, there's another thing that tends to work: slice up a tomato, and leave it in the room while you're asleep, or occupying the space in some manner. I've woken up one morning and saw dead mosquitoes on the plate next to the tomato.

    Just remember to take the tomato and put it in the fridge when you're not using it, otherwise it creates a terrible pong!

    1. IzzyM profile image88
      IzzyMposted 7 years agoin reply to this

      That's a new one to me and certainly worth a try smile

  12. paradigmsearch profile image90
    paradigmsearchposted 7 years ago

    The only good mosquito…

    I read somewhere that bats eat their weight in mosquitoes every day.

 
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