RonElFran profile image 95

Who owns the copyright to a POW id card image?


I'm planning a hub about a man who was held as a POW by the Germans in WW2. When his prison camp was liberated, he went to the office and picked up his ID card, which he shows in his book. My question: does he own the copyright to that card image? I would say he does not, since he didn't produce or authorize the card, and the government that did produce it is defunct and its successor certainly won't claim ownership. I think that places it in the public domain. But I'd like some input on that question.

 

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lisavollrath profile image89

Best Answer Lisa Vollrath (lisavollrath) says

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20 months ago
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    Ronald E. Franklin (RonElFran) 20 months ago

    Lisa, I seem to remember a Wikipedia explanation that you can't copyright a photo of a public domain image. I'll have to see if I can find one of those statements. Thanks for responding.


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Liz Elias (DzyMsLizzy) says

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19 months ago
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Kappygirl says

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20 months ago
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Stephen J Parkin (Dressage Husband) says

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20 months ago
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    Ronald E. Franklin (RonElFran) 20 months ago

    Thanks for responding, Stephen. The former POW is an American, and the id was created by his German captors. My thought is that if someone else had picked up that id card and published it, I don't think our former POW could claim copyright violation.

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Eric Dierker (Ericdierker) says

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20 months ago
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    Ronald E. Franklin (RonElFran) 20 months ago

    Thanks, Eric. To argue against myself, our former POW might claim ownership because it's his photo and personal data on the card. But law enforcement frequently publishes the photo and personal data of prisoners with no copyright violation.


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Sam Tumblin profile image39

Sam Tumblin says

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20 months ago
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    Ronald E. Franklin (RonElFran) 20 months ago

    Thanks, Sam. I'm hoping the consensus will be that it is in the public domain.