I wonder if native english speaking people can understand ancient english langua

Jump to Last Post 1-6 of 6 discussions (18 posts)
  1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
    Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years ago

    I wonder if native english speaking people can understand ancient english language?

  2. MickS profile image70
    MickSposted 6 years ago

    Generally no, modern English is very diferent to the old language.

    1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Now i see why my question quoting a poem "Beofulf" was deleted :-) Moderator probably thought it was in foreign language :-)

  3. Haunty profile image83
    Hauntyposted 6 years ago

    Pavlo, can you understand this?
    Jeg har lært å snakke mange språk riktig.
    This is Norwegian and it's easy for an English-speaking person - ESL or not - to translate, much easier than a line from Beowulf.

    1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      No, I can not understand this at all. I am from Ukraine and Ukrainian language is a little bit different :-) or rather to say absolutely different. I wish you asked me if I can understand ancient Russian....

    2. Haunty profile image83
      Hauntyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I'm from Hungary, so we are neighbors. hahah
      And this is an interesting question. CAN you understand Russian?

    3. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      You asked me a very good question. No i can not (funny isnt it), but I hoped English language is different and native speakes do understand it. Ancient Russian learn only students of russian philology. it is a dead language

    4. MickS profile image70
      MickSposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I can't translate, English is my mother tongue.  Guessing - Jeg (you) har (are) laert (?) a (a) snakke (snake) mange (manage) sprake (speak) riktig (?)

    5. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      to Mics: a moment of truth. Can you translate this? Fyrst forth gewat. Flota waes on ythum bat under beorge. (dear moderator PLEASE do not delete this. It is not a foreign language)

    6. MickS profile image70
      MickSposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      No, I can't translte, but I'll have a guess at some of the words: flota (float) Fyrst (first) waes (was) bat (but) beorge (boat/barge) so, something about a boat first floating on water, but was then under something. (sank/wrecked)

    7. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you Micks. You can live on translating Ancient English :-) I found this translation: Fyrst forth gewat. Flota waes on ythum bat under beorge. - "Time on departed. Floater was on waves boat under hill". Thank you again. That was interesting.

  4. The Indexer profile image82
    The Indexerposted 6 years ago

    It depends on what you mean by "ancient". The language normally referred to as "Anglo-Saxon" is virtually a foreign language, although it contains the roots of much of modern English. This was the language spoken before the Norman Conquest of 1066, but that event brought French and Latin influences into English, and the "Middle English" of Chaucer's time (14th century) is much easier for for a modern reader to understand. It still takes a bit of work for most people, but a little immersion in "The Canterbury Tales" (for example) pays dividends in terms of understanding.

    1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for an answer. Actually i thought about earlier times than the 14th century. When i was a student of Romano-German Philology we learned a big part of Beofulf by heart. I was always wondering how much english it sounds for a native speaker.

  5. Bretsuki profile image77
    Bretsukiposted 6 years ago

    Hello Pavlo,

    It could also depend upon whether one hears the language or has to read it.

    Some English dialects and accents are closer to Old English than others so hearing the language spoken can be easier than trying to read a transliteration of a script.

    As with all languages though meanings of individual words can change over time so while we may hear an Old English word today, there is no guarantee it means the same to us as it did a person 1,000 years ago.

    1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you for an answer. Probably this is the reason why the same old texts are translated by different people defferently. Every translator tries to find his own meaning of the interpreted text

  6. aethelthryth profile image91
    aethelthrythposted 6 years ago

    Once I was in Yorkshire, having great difficulty understanding a Yorkshireman who was saying something about ducks and the river.  My friend from Colorado did not join in the conversation at all because he thought we were speaking German.
    So actually, native speakers of modern English can't even understand other native speakers of modern English.  Probably Yorkshire English is closer to ancient English.
    Or maybe the musical "My Fair Lady" is right in saying Americans haven't used English for years.

    1. Pavlo Badovskyy profile image79
      Pavlo Badovskyyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      to tell the truth people in eastern part of Ukraine not always can understand people from western part. That became a source of inspiration for many and many linquists who write their books devoted to language analyses :-)

    2. MickS profile image70
      MickSposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      North Eastern English vernacular is said to be rooted in old Norse.

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)