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In your opinion, which dialects or variety of English should be used by an onlin

  1. Tinsky profile image94
    Tinskyposted 5 years ago

    In your opinion, which dialects or variety of English should be used by an online writer?

    This question doesn't directly relate just to Hubpages, but to any blog or website where the target audience is a mix of nationalities from different countries?  Should it be English (UK), English (USA),  Australian English or another unmentioned variety?  Which would you prefer to read?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7531846_f260.jpg

  2. JyurriOukan profile image61
    JyurriOukanposted 5 years ago

    American English is what I prefer. But then again, I am American. So I don't think I supply much of an answer.

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I was after what readers would prefer, so yes your answer is relevant.  Thanks.

  3. annart profile image86
    annartposted 5 years ago

    Being English, I would prefer to read standard English or American English from USA writers.
    Any professional writing should always be in standard English (albeit some American spelling which is of course acceptable) with no dialect (that's only for speech).  Some regional words are well-known so acceptable too.
    If you are writing a text then just about anything goes, as with an email to a friend. For multi-national output then standard English should be adhered to, as then everyone is much more likely to understand.

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It seems that 4, maybe 5 people are in a similar agreement. Not sure I like mixing the English (USA) & English (UK) together even if their differences in spelling are well known. I like consistency. Mixing could lead to using both variations.

  4. old albion profile image69
    old albionposted 5 years ago

    I intended a longer answer but having read the comment by annart, it has already been said. So I second the comment.
    Graham.

    1. annart profile image86
      annartposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, old albion!

  5. jlpark profile image84
    jlparkposted 5 years ago

    If it's in English - in which ever you naturally write in.  Australia and NZ use English (UK) so have the 'u' in colour and in favourite etc.  The spell check on your computer will advertise to you if you are spelling it wrong for the language your computer is set it - I use UK English and when I use US spellings it underlines them.

    They are correct either way.  Most English readers and writers barely notice the spelling of anything bar 'Mom" and "Mum" - not sure why that one sticks out!. 

    Using Te Reo Maori for a NZer and Aboriginal for Australia, and any native slang to either country (esky for one! ohhhh...and Fanny - bum in US, ...errr....Front Bum in NZ and Australia!) would be the only thing that would confuse people.

    Go with what you know and use all the time - your writing will flow better if you aren't worried.

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In Microsoft Word, you actually have a choice for English (Australian) so there must be some differences to English (UK).  It's probably the local differences of names as you suggest. A simple glossary might overcome this if its not too colloquial.

  6. Virgo908 profile image80
    Virgo908posted 5 years ago

    I always prefer to read English (USA) in print and online...

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for letting me know your preference.

  7. austinhealy profile image73
    austinhealyposted 5 years ago

    In my opinion, there is something definitely attractive about writing in "real" UK English, which I am not capable of doing. However, some books such as mystery novels, and I'm thinking of Raymond Chandler or Ed McBain for example, fare very well with the American version of the English language. In the end, I tend to think that it depends on the topic, the era of writing and of course, the origin of the writer. Excellent question!

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I hadn't thought of it from the point of view of the topic and era of the writing. But I could see how that what work if you were writing historical articles or if your topic was specific to a particular country, even if its not the writer's country.

  8. profile image0
    paxwillposted 5 years ago

    I don't think it matters, but you should just be consistent and choose the variety that comes most natural to you.  American English speakers can perfectly understand British English and vice versa. Google and other search engines are smart and know when two words are equivalent, even if there is a minor spelling difference, so there's no SEO advantage in one or the other.

    1. Tinsky profile image94
      Tinskyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm beginning to become more aware of SEO with a Word Press plugin at another site where I am a writer. If you don't mind the use of either one, that's helpful and would give support to austinhealy's reply.

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