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What is the longest word that only has one syllable?

  1. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
    LoisRyan13903posted 4 years ago

    What is the longest word that only has one syllable?

    I can think of two

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 4 years ago

    Broughams: a four-wheeled, boxlike, closed carriage for two or four persons, having the driver's perch outside.

    1. MickS profile image73
      MickSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Not sure how you say that in the USA, JT, but I look at it from an English point of view and it looks like 2 sylables.  I would say it - bruffhams.

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Trust me Mick, it is one word.

    3. Becky Katz profile image83
      Becky Katzposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Pronounced "broom" or "brohm

    4. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
      LoisRyan13903posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Another nine letter word.

    5. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Pronounced "Broom>"

  3. JayeWisdom profile image92
    JayeWisdomposted 4 years ago

    I assume you mean in the English language.  The first one that came to mind was "scratched", with nine letters. That made me think of "scrunched"--which I think is a real word, also nine letters. I seem to be stuck in the letter "S" as the only others I can think of right now with nine letters are "stretched" and "scrounged."  I can't think of any words of one syllable with more than nine letters.

    1. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
      LoisRyan13903posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yes I meant in the English Language and I knew stretched.  I think 9 letters in the highest.  You also get a bonus for scrounged and scratched I couldn't guess those

    2. MickS profile image73
      MickSposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      A ten-letter word scraunched, from the 1620 English translation of Don Quixote, can be found in the Oxford.  There are several nine letter single sylable words.

    3. JayeWisdom profile image92
      JayeWisdomposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks!

  4. Ericdierker profile image57
    Ericdierkerposted 4 years ago

    I am quite certain that I am correct but would love to be proved wrong.

    Mile

    1. profile image0
      Motown2Chitownposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Following your train of thought.

    2. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
      LoisRyan13903posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      LOL!

  5. SidKemp profile image95
    SidKempposted 4 years ago

    It sounds like LoisRyan and JayWisdom agree that a word is one syllable if it is pronounced in one syllable, even if, in spelling, it has two syllables, as the "ed" at the end would be a second syllable, orthographically.

    Following those rules, I would add screeched as another 9-letter example.

    And thank, I'd always wondered how brougham was pronounced.

    Might there be some English geographic place names with long spellings and short pronunciations?

    1. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
      LoisRyan13903posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      screeched was the other one I knew of

 
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