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Grammar help - "on" and "upon."

  1. Easy Exercise profile image85
    Easy Exerciseposted 3 years ago

    Grammar help - "on" and "upon."

    I want to say this sentence with proper grammar - can you please guide me?
    "I don't judge people based upon race, creed, color or gender. I judge them based upon spelling, grammar, sentence structure and punctuation."
    What proposition should I use and when? "on" or "upon".

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12336405_f260.jpg

  2. Jodah profile image90
    Jodahposted 3 years ago

    Hi Kelly, I would use "on" in both instances but that's just because I think it sounds better. I am not really an expert. There are other hubbers here who can advise you correctly.

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi John,
      I struggle with grammar and writing in general. I love to communicate, but the details of grammar and punctuation often stump me.
      Enjoyed your answer - simply and straight forward and deferring to the experts.
      Thank you!

    2. Jodah profile image90
      Jodahposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Kelly, I feel a simple answer is sometimes the best. As writers we can tend to become too verbose at times for our own good. I too sometimes struggle with grammar.

  3. olmosley profile image71
    olmosleyposted 3 years ago

    There's no wrong answer. The use of either word is solely based on the style of writing.

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Olmosley,
      Thank you for contributing.
      Greatly appreciate it.

  4. Rakim Cheeks profile image60
    Rakim Cheeksposted 3 years ago

    Hello. Kelly. Great question! I would use on. Simply, because it sounds better when you are starting a sentence. For example, you might say, On Sunday afternoons, I go to the park because I enjoy the atmosphere. Did that help?

    1. olmosley profile image71
      olmosleyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      As opposed to saying 'Upon Saturday afternoons, I go to the park because I enjoy the atmosphere'?

    2. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Rakim,
      Yes, thank you!

    3. Rakim Cheeks profile image60
      Rakim Cheeksposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Kelly. Would you follow me? I'm trying to build my audience on hub pages

  5. tsmog profile image81
    tsmogposted 3 years ago

    Hard question for a grammar dunce like myself said with a smile. I cannot provide an answer for your quest as I do not know the destination. My hope is that makes some kind of sense.

    The emphasis appears with the statement two goals are being sought to achieve. One is negating physical properties as a requirement of 'being' judged by the person judging while the modal property is emphasized as that which is judged. At question is emphasis for the usage of 'on' and 'upon'.

    They could be said are synonymous. They both have a degree of commonality. The criteria for judging has been proclaimed as being "spelling, grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation". Using that as a lead we may ask difference between 'on' and 'upon'. On means resting on a surface like a chair, a bed, and even resting while standing on the earthen ground. Upon is the formalized usage of 'on', even though offers 'arriving' somewhere at times. Simple enough.

    The first sentence of the statement addresses all persons of any commonality . . . people. The second statement address those being judged, which most likely is a segment of people - 'them'. That segment is not identified, so one may construe there is hidden or forbidden knowledge known only by the author of the question at hand. No matter as the second statement is of importance, therefore seeks a formal address.

    With that a recommendation writing the statement as "I don't judge people based on race, creed, color, or gender. (A generalized statement with commonality) I judge 'them' based 'upon' spelling, grammar, sentence structure, and punctuation." There is power rather than force. We may see that with the following;

    people → common → generalized → less formal = on
    them → specific audience → narrowed → formal = upon

    One must realize without knowing the context within the content this answer is addressing emphasis. That is pointing toward a direction, a destination, a point of arrival. However, the illusion of the illustration is a different thought exercise entirely. Reading a story beginning with "Once upon a time" one would 'expect' soon to be introduced to 'the' time increasing anticipation of explaining or describing 'Once' and its mystery within 'many'.

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Tim,
      Wowza! What a fantastic answer complete with a diagram to direct the author to be focused TO the reader.
      I especially like your "context within the content".
      Thank you very much!

  6. Chris Antonaros profile image60
    Chris Antonarosposted 3 years ago

    I would use "on" for both cases. It sounds better and "upon" describes position more than state of mind or physical characteristics. Good luck writing!!!

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Christos,
      Thank you so much for sharing. And thank for the good luck - always need luck!

  7. BruceDPrice profile image78
    BruceDPriceposted 3 years ago

    Upon is just "up on" that has contracted to one word. In most situations the  on conveys enough information so you don't need the up.That's why many people are saying they prefer on.

    "The King sits up on the throne" seems to give a bit of gratuitous information.

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Bruce,
      Great answer with a fun example. Thank you!

  8. peachpurple profile image82
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    i vote for the opposite" upon" , I am no expert in English but as far as I could remember; it should be "upon"

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Peachy,
      Thank you so much for sharing!
      And I love your moniker! Fun!

  9. girlpower profile image79
    girlpowerposted 3 years ago

    judge them based on" spellingi will enjoy following your hubs..

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi GirlPower,
      Thank you for sharing. You go girl!

  10. cat on a soapbox profile image97
    cat on a soapboxposted 3 years ago

    Either one would suffice since they are considered to be interchangeable.  I prefer "upon" in this case because I like the traditional ( formal) style; however, I think most people feel comfortable w/ the more casual usage of "on."

    1. Easy Exercise profile image85
      Easy Exerciseposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Catherine,
      It is interesting how we sometimes prefer more formality. I didn't see this question as one of formality until I read the answers. I can clearly see how that one word could be more formal.
      I am with you on the traditional.

 
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