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It's National Poetry Month. Which poet would you like to meet most?

  1. Patsybell profile image89
    Patsybellposted 12 months ago

    It's National Poetry Month. Which poet would you like to meet most?

    Spend the day with a poet. Take a stroll, enjoy tea in the garden, Have an extravagant dinner or a picnic. The best thing is that you get to talk with this poet.

  2. Nellieanna profile image83
    Nellieannaposted 12 months ago

    I'd love to meet Emily Dickinson, who is my muse.  But she was so shy during her lifetime, it would not have been easy to meet her!    Once she knew me, though, we would have had a most enjoyable meeting, strolling in her garden, playing with her dog, perhaps  talking about life and even politics.  We might have paused for tea or refreshments, but possibly we wouldn't have taken time for that!

    1. Patsybell profile image89
      Patsybellposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      I enjoyed reading your thoughtful answer. Thank you.

  3. Angelladywriter profile image58
    Angelladywriterposted 12 months ago

    I would love to meet Common, who is very talented with his poetic words. He is not only a rapper, songwriter, performer but an excellent poet.

    1. Patsybell profile image89
      Patsybellposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      You sent this old lady to the internet with your reply. I know him best for a song that Common and John Legend wrote,“Glory” for the 2014 film Selma.

    2. Angelladywriter profile image58
      Angelladywriterposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Your research was commendable. That is exactly who I was referring to. Thanks for this intriguing question and interesting response.

  4. Seafarer Mama profile image88
    Seafarer Mamaposted 12 months ago

    I'd love to meet Lord Byron and Robert Burns.  Would also love to meet Edna St. Vincent Millay.

    1. Patsybell profile image89
      Patsybellposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      "Auld Lang Syne," by Robert Burns, may be his best known poem. But few Americans know what Auld Lang Syne means. Still, we sing it every year.

  5. CJ Bellville profile image60
    CJ Bellvilleposted 8 months ago

    My choice, this late in the game for me, surprisingly is Sylvia Plath.  When I was young I could never relate to her tug, constantly into the wrenching pain she poured out on the pages, I felt when I was young it may be contagious, and I really wanted no part of it's message.  Now, in my 50's, I take comfort in her work, and the words she suffered through to write. 

    " And I
    Am the arrow,

    The dew that flies
    Suicidal, at one with the drive
    Into the red

    Eye, the cauldron of morning.“

    from the poem Ariel, October 12, 1962

 
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