How do you get a nasty odor out of a plastic rubbermaid food storage container?

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  1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
    Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years ago

    How do you get a nasty odor out of a plastic rubbermaid food storage container?

    I just found a container that had been in my fridge for (apparently) quite some time (I was wondering where it was). After emptying it, letting it soak in hot, soapy water and washing it several times, it still stinks. Is there a way to get rid of the foul odor?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6795857_f260.jpg

  2. nmdonders profile image84
    nmdondersposted 6 years ago

    I know that hose things absorb odors like crazy.  Maybe try some lemon juice.  It seems to be good for stuff like that.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Should I soak it in lemon juice? lol it's really bad... or would washing it suffice you think?

    2. nmdonders profile image84
      nmdondersposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Yep, I would just squirt a little bit and rub it around.  Then let it sit for a bit and wash it out again.  Baking soda is a good idea too.  Just a little bit, it's fairly cheap.

  3. Cristale profile image84
    Cristaleposted 6 years ago

    What about just throwing it away and getting another one? Smells are tough to get out of tupperware, especially the really bad smells.

    You look familiar by the way!

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Throwing it away isn't really an option, bad economy and all...

    2. Cristale profile image84
      Cristaleposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      You know it's clean, right? Maybe just use it and the smell of the new food will take over...

  4. MickS profile image70
    MickSposted 6 years ago

    Apply a liberal coating of bi-carbonate of soda and leave it without the lid on.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This worked well actually, it got out most of the nasty ordor, but it still left a bit, so I'm trying lemon juice next... big_smile

  5. Barbara Kay profile image91
    Barbara Kayposted 6 years ago

    Try scrubbing it with baking soda and rinse. After drying if it still smells, pour some more baking soda in the container and close with the lid. If after a week it still smells, put some vinegar in it. The problem with the vinegar is that then you'll need to get that smell out.

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This one worked!! My container smells fresh and clean!

  6. fpherj48 profile image78
    fpherj48posted 6 years ago

    Daughter......It can sometimes depend on "what" was in there.  I find that I usually have results with a strong solution of pure lemon juice (Real Lemon Concentrate)........left to soak....in the sun, if you can....for hours....even overnight. 
    Now.....from one home maker to another.....if you wind up using numerous products to get this odor out.....figure out the $$ you're spending.  If the odor won't budge, 1st. check with Rubber Maid's "guarantee".  Call or email the company and see if they won't send you a FREE container?.....OR   buy a new one and use the stinky one outdoors somewhere!   Save yourself!!  LOL

    1. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Oh brilliant, I didn't think of contacting Rubbermaid lol. I'l try jonny's idea (since it's free) and check their website at the same time. Thank you!!!

    2. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I kind of like cristale's idea of putting a different (nice smelling) food in it.......I suggest CHOCOLATE cake!!

    3. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      lmao, I really don't want to run the risk of my yummy chocolate cake smelling like bad broccoli.... EEEWWWW!!! Ick yuck... can you imagine if it tasted like that???

    4. fpherj48 profile image78
      fpherj48posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Daughter....Do you mean to say, you've never eaten chocolate-coated broccoli???   What a sheltered life you lead!!    lol

  7. jonnycomelately profile image81
    jonnycomelatelyposted 6 years ago

    Some of you might cringe at this idea, but it comes from my knowledge and experience of the "natural" world.   I.e., I have been really into composting for a long time, quite successful too in general.

    What I would try is this:  find some nice moist top-soil.  The sort you would be growing plants in.   Not wet and anaerobic, this might bring further "smell" problems.

    I would fill the container with this soil and leave it for a week or two.  Provided the soil is active, with lots of natural organisms withing it, I reckon the smell would be gone when you cleaned it out and then gave it a good wash.   

    All that energetic cleaning you have been doing might have microscopically scratched the inner surface of the container.   The smell is probably stuck into the fine scratches so your further cleaning does not move it.   My theory is that the microbes in the soil will remove it.  A light rinse with hot soapy water should remove the soil and leave it non-smelly and clean.

    If you feel like trying this and it does not work, then all you have is a container for growing plants in.

    Good luck.

    1. jonnycomelately profile image81
      jonnycomelatelyposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      EM, i.e. Effective Micro-organisms might do the trick. Google this to find out more about it. 
      Lactic acid bacteria might help. Fill the container with milk and allow it to go sour and moldy over a week or two.

    2. Daughter Of Maat profile image95
      Daughter Of Maatposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      That's actually a brilliant idea. I've got a compost pile going in the backyard, I should probably use the dirt from that? My soil is nothing but clay and sand (hence the compost pile).

    3. jonnycomelately profile image81
      jonnycomelatelyposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Two years later, I am wondering if Daughter of Maat tried the experiment and whether it worked or not.

  8. peachpurple profile image81
    peachpurpleposted 3 years ago

    i heard that lemon juice or vinegar should get rid of it but it didn't work out for me. I just leave it in the water and keep changing it

 
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