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Should I top off tomato plants?

  1. Melis Ann profile image92
    Melis Annposted 5 years ago

    Should I top off tomato plants?

    In the northeast U.S. the end of the growing season for tomatoes can come in September, but could also last into October depending on weather. Should I top off the tomato plants in anticipation of end the season to ensure that existing fruit can grow larger and ripen? If so, how long before the expected end of season is this a good idea? Weeks/days?

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  2. gorilla24 profile image72
    gorilla24posted 5 years ago

    Doing this does stunt the plant. The wisdom of pruning tomato plants at all.... is actually also hotly debated.  Studies have shown pruning to be counter-productive. I live in the South East and I never top off my tomato plants, I just let nature run its course!

    1. Melis Ann profile image92
      Melis Annposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for your answer gorilla24 - I have some plants that I have left natural and some where I have pruned. My pruned plants have leaf curl from the pruning trama, but with more plants per square foot I have had good production so far.

    2. gorilla24 profile image72
      gorilla24posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm glad you have had a productive growing season! Your question has made me want to try pruning my tomato plants, I have never done it before because I was scared lol. But this was a great and intriguing question! Thanks

    3. Melis Ann profile image92
      Melis Annposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I was nervous too gorilla24, but felt better I was doing it both ways just in case. I have some info in a hub you might be interested in! http://melisann.hubpages.com/_zu1daahhx … ble-Garden

  3. Patsybell profile image90
    Patsybellposted 5 years ago

    A few extra steps in the fall will put you weeks ahead in the spring. Try these simple low cost or no cost suggestions. That will mean less work and more vegetables for you. read more

  4. mvillecat profile image78
    mvillecatposted 5 years ago

    Down here in Georgia, I conducted an experiment with pruning one tomato and living the rest natural. I kind of like the natural look and did not see much difference in fruit production. However, what you are talking about I have read that it is helpful to do this closer to the frost date. If you have multiple plants, maybe do what I did and try it on some. Whatever the outcome, you will have learned a lesson for next season.

    1. Melis Ann profile image92
      Melis Annposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks mvillecat - I have many plants and will run an experiment! I have several plants. Some of which are pruned to run up a trellis and some of which are left to grow uncontrollably:)

  5. JamesGrantSmith profile image59
    JamesGrantSmithposted 4 years ago

    When i used to grow Tomotos i did not top them off, because studies have suggested it stunts the Tomatos growth rather than actually helping them.

 
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