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Ten things most Americans don't know about America

  1. profile image0
    Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago

    Some at HubPages will state that I hate America. That is not so. I am disappointed in this country and, for cultural reasons, I don't fit in. As a writer, it has been stressed to me that I have a responsibility to bring information to other people.

    That said, here is an American speaking to other Americans. It was brought to my attention by a fellow first generation Plusser (G+). He said it was very much like what I was trying to say - only he said he better. Um, yes, he does!

    http://postmasculine.com/america



    I don't want to fight with anyone. I just want you to think...

    1. paradigmsearch profile image84
      paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I read it.

      Folks, you have GOT to see that video at the end of the blog.

      Edit: And do read the blog first before seeing the video.

    2. profile image0
      Sarra Garrettposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      WOW!!! I LOVE IT!!! BRUTALLY HONEST!!! 
      Too bad they won't put this on TV

      As an American, I'm ashamed of what America has become.  Yes, if I could I would leave but I can't so I'm staying.  We used to be a Proud Nation.  We aren't anymore.  At least I knew Her when she was once great and powerful.  I'll die in poverty and being ashamed of how America was torn down.

    3. tsmog profile image84
      tsmogposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I appreciate your perspective and position. The video at that blog post was interesting to say the least, since the facts were facts. A wake up call sort to speak. However, I discovered the other videos were intriguing. A 12 year old girl researched the U.S. presidents discovering all but one are related to King John of England (John Lackland). That includes Obama too. King John was the signer of the Magna Carta in 1215. She researched lineage facilitating both genders rather than only the male. (Center bottom video available at blog video after ending). So, possibly one could say the presidency as the leadership is cause for the lackluster of America today if seeking blame, although not the intent. Could we say it is in their genes? Just food for thought and a giggle. Speaking of giggles take a peek at the bottom left video. A compilation of news hosts bloopers offers some hearty good laughs, which could be guaranteed, yet we all know how good a guarantee is. No warranty implied or otherwise either.

      The only pause for concern I have regarding the author's article is it is like our elections today. The negative connotations just may be a ploy seeking migrants. That along causes one to wonder just why? I saw a whole bunch of likes and tweets at that article, yet consider the band width of the server. Either sales are low and customer service is suffering or there is interference creating the very slow information exchange rate with article download. I near read two hubs on a different window waiting and learned something new. Seems most comments to this point are in agreement too agreeing with the content it seems.

      (Insert social commentary disclaimer here)

    4. profile image65
      logic,commonsenseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Since the founding of this country, millions have come to this country and fit in.  Why do you think that you are unable to?

      1. profile image0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Um, let's see...

        What has that to do with the topic. Are you into Ad Hominem attacks as well? It shows a profound inability to stick to the topic.

        That said, have you any idea how many people go back to their own countries after coming here and finding that they don't like it?

        http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/16/us/mo … wanted=all

        http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Articles/ … aspx#page1

        http://www.soc.duke.edu/GlobalEngineeri … killed.pdf

        http://caffertyfile.blogs.cnn.com/2011/ … tter-life/

        http://jobs.aol.com/articles/2012/08/06 … e-u-s-for/

        http://venturebeat.com/2011/04/28/why-e … g-america/

        http://articles.businessinsider.com/201 … ion-expert

        I could probably supply you with thousands of links of immigrants who don't like this place and return to their home. It's just that because Americans need this constant hype of how wonderful they and their country is that the media keeps telling them these stories... It's a great way to keep people in control.

    5. profile image0
      Emile Rposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I read it. It isn't a fair representation. I'd give a point for point reason why, but if you want to see it that way it is your choice.

    6. rhamson profile image76
      rhamsonposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I saw this on Newsroom. I think it was the opening sequence.

      I agree with everything Jeff Daniels said in his speech. It was blunt and to the point.

      But if I could point out one thing he said that flew by so quickly that it was almost lost. He said that we used to be informed. We used to be informed! That was so important in the forming of this country that it is protected by the Constitution. Freedom of the press used to mean something. It is the lifeblood of decision making, being informed. But in this internet crazy date in time the newspapers are going out of business and being bought out by corporate knaves who's only morality is to make more money. The Constitution be damned as it has no effect when taken by these thieves. People like Murdoch who foster right wing bulls#!t as an alternative to truth and debatable topics are only in it for the money and who they can influence to get more money.

      The mindless dribble that is offered to us on television that is supposed to represent news is meant to provoke a reaction and eschew any deep thought more over only to garner more ratings and advertisers. Money is the key and our government, our morality and our values are being inundated with greed and conquest. What a distinct difference from when this kid born in the fifties and raised in the sixties saw how a great country fell into decay.

  2. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 4 years ago

    It wouldn't load for me - might, however, be the fault of my ISP rather than your link.

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Let me try again...

      1. profile image0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        John, I tried it in IE. It works... http://postmasculine.com/america

        1. paradigmsearch profile image84
          paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Works with Chrome as well.

  3. rebekahELLE profile image88
    rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago

    Sophia, I don't get why you focus on this stuff.  Most of us don't live our lives focused on what others may or may not think of us.  It doesn't matter.  While I see stuff that makes me cringe at times,  odd human behavior is not exclusive to Americans.  We all have different set points.  I think you tend to focus on what you don't like, which is what you will seek and find.

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      rebekahELLE, From the age of 14 to the age of 39, I also focused on getting rid of Apartheid in South Africa. I guess some would think that was supid of me. Sorry, I guess it's a family tradition. Between 1933 and 1936, after my late father was kicked out of the German Law Courts for being a Jew (he was a practicing magistrate - like a Judge in the junior court), he used his second degree as a journalist to write about what was happening to Jews in Germany and tried to get them to leave.

      it is absolutely ingrained in me to write about serious social issues.

      "First thing in solving a problem is recognzing there is one. America is not the greatest country in the world anymore."

      Quote from the video.

      Maybe I want to make it great again? smile

      1. profile image0
        Justsilvieposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Interesting reading and I do agree with all the 10 points but I think to be able to share this view one has to have a point of comparison. I think Americans like people in other countries who are doing Ok, rarely see or look for the problems unless they are affected by them.

        I look at where I live; reading, television and travel are the only thing that really tells me what the true situation in my state is. You speak to someone born and bred here, they do not see it, they are shocked when you bring up the poverty, the crime rate the low education ratings or any negatives about the place. These facts instantly become “fighten words” and the only thing that could make them dislike me even more would be the say something negative about the states College Football teams.

      2. rebekahELLE profile image88
        rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I agree with some of what the author states.  While I see issues in America that trouble me, I also see them worldwide.  But all I can focus on is my life and corner of the world, my family, community, etc.  I am active in what I believe is important.  I believe education is important, so I teach.  I share what I don't need with others, I give it away or donate to charities. I speak up whenever I can if I feel it will make a difference.  I believe in the ripple effect.

        I don't believe in labels.  They don't always identify effectively, or honestly.

        America is like an adolescent.  We are still trying to grow up and get through these turbulent teen years.  We are continuing to find our way, and we will make mistakes.  But the single most terrible issue in  America is complacency.  To make changes, people must be informed (not from Fox news, etc.) and make a difference in whatever way we can.  There will continue to be unease and unrest because of different opinions concerning social issues.  Strong leadership needs strong, informed, active supporters.

        When there is a problem, I want to hear solutions.  What are we going to do about it. I don't want to hear the whining (not directed at you or anyone in particular).  Tell me what you're going to do to make it better.   We have this one life.   smile

        1. profile image0
          Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          RebekahELLE... You said, "But the single most terrible issue in  America is complacency.:

          And that's what I'm trying to shake. That's what I do. If you read through my reviews on my author page, you'll see I'm known fo rmaking people think.

          That said, I'm now moving in a different direction because I think the relection of Obama and the re-emergence of Occupy as a community do-gooder tells me that a lot of people now realize all this.

          So my new direction is finding solutions, encouraging community, building up people who have nothing, etc. smile

          And you'e right about the education. 100%.  smile

  4. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 4 years ago

    Ah, got in, I think it was the shear size of the page that was causing it to load very slowly!

    I think that should be made compulsory reading for every American. No, we don't hate you all, we don't even think about you most of the time, and we do have a better and cheaper healthcare system.

    A very perceptive writer.

    1. Petra Vlah profile image60
      Petra Vlahposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Bill Maher's YouTub  "America isn't Nr. 1" is hilarious, but not "funny".  Check it out

      1. profile image0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        What's the URL?

        1. Petra Vlah profile image60
          Petra Vlahposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I never knew how to post links, but just type Bill Maher and America isn't nr. 1 and it will show up. When you find it, please post the link so others may see it - it makes all the points of the article

          1. profile image0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            It's

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ys7ZiRDEky

            To all those people who keep asking why I keep mentioning this, here's why.

            Because every time I point out that something is wrong, I get told that America is the number one counry and the best country in the worldd.

            Well, America is NOT number one except the highly negative things. So, yes, those things have to be fixed up. And it's time people stopped giving the reason for not fixing them as 'Well,America is the greatest, biggest, best country in the world, and that's why we don't have to do anything about our abysmal education system/our lack of adequate medical facilities for most people, our terrible poisonous food, etc.

            1. Petra Vlah profile image60
              Petra Vlahposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Sophia, the link is not working, could you check it, please?

  5. prettydarkhorse profile image60
    prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago

    Every culture is unique. I got that, the beauty in this country is that most are accepting and Americans do "laugh out loud", cool and most are friendly! People can say F u, then afterwards they hug you, it is no big deal. I love America, specially football. I have been to different countries. I am an immigrant BTW.

    Choice is all, in US you have a "choice" - it offers a choice for you as long as you are able. Not all are successful, but you can be successful. Success is different for each one of us.

  6. wilderness profile image93
    wildernessposted 4 years ago

    While it may surprise you (from our past conversations) I find most of the article spot on.

    I do view northern Mexico, Columbia and most of the near East as very dangerous places for Americans, but really have no hard evidence to support that.  Perhaps I'm wrong in the perception and we really are paranoid.

    We are poor, or at least different, at expressing gratitude, and (IMHO) very poor at expressing affection.  Some of that is merely a language or cultural difference, though.  A one time Canadian friend was always quite offended as an American reply to his "Thank you" was "No problem" or "You bet" - it should be "You're welcome" and he was unable to recognize that although the words are different, they mean the same.

    I will take exception to the cost of medical care; his friend did NOT get knee surgery for free.  Somebody most definitely paid for it and shifting to cost to someone besides the recipient of the care does not make it free.  Similarly, his own health insurance did NOT cost $65 per month - somebody else picked up the extra cost of that insurance unless you believe that average medical care costs are just $65 per month in that country.

    "Americans believe it’s your responsibility to take care of yourself and make something of yourself, not the state’s..."  I would also take exception to the implication that this is a "failure" on the part of Americans.  It doesn't line up with much of the rest of the world and America is gradually moving away from the concept, but neither makes it "wrong" somehow.  Just different (and very successful in building a countries "wealth"), no matter how unacceptable it may be to many.

    I tried reading some of the comments, but they quickly degenerated in bashing other countries for their faults, which is immaterial to the article.  I do think we as Americans could learn much from it as most of it really is a good take on some of the social "problems" we have created for ourselves.

    1. wilderness profile image93
      wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I would add that no one country or society has a total handle on what is "best" culturally, and that it would behoove every society to take a hard look at others in the world before choosing what they will value and promote.  We can definitely learn much from other cultures.

  7. justateacher profile image87
    justateacherposted 4 years ago

    This was a great article. I wasn't sure how I was going to react to it, but I was surprised at how true it was. While I have not traveled outside the US, I have had friends and relatives that have, and many say the same things - Americans are mostly not even thought about in other countries because people in other countries are thinking about their daily lives. As Americans we want to think that there is no better country in our world. At one time, this might have been true. It's not so true anymore. We need to realize that we do have problems -and we need to fix them.

  8. A Troubled Man profile image61
    A Troubled Manposted 4 years ago

    Three words is all it takes to describe America.

    Honey Boo Boo.

  9. tirelesstraveler profile image83
    tirelesstravelerposted 4 years ago

    So true about Americans mistaking comfort for happiness.  Some of the happiest children I have ever met have nothing.  Little education, little food, little comfort, but they have lots of gratitude.  It is unfortunate comfort and education tends to cloud ability to be grateful for the small things that make true happiness.

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      tirelesstraveler, yes, his wording struck me. I couldn't figure out how people in this country could think they were happy when half of them were on anti-depressants. And then it struck me when I read that article - they confuse comfort with happiness!

  10. prettydarkhorse profile image60
    prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago

    Sophia, you might want to look at the Index of Happiness by UN as quoted in this article by CNN. US is number four. I agree with the list. http://travel.cnn.com/explorations/life … try-247768

    And most depressed countries, a study commissioned by the WHO  (they studied 18 countries only), here look at the list. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style … 26414.html

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Actually, pettydarkhorse. I actually have been looking at it for years. It puzzled me. From my personal interaction with Americans over the past nine years, I would have said that they were the unhappiest and lonelist people in the world. This is a perspective that comes up when immigrants talk to each other about Americans. It's about the first thing they say.

      That's why I could never understand how they got on those lists. However, I do now. As per the above article, it's because Americans, when asked if they are happy, they say yes because they confuse happiness with comfort. The guy got it in a nutshell.

      No other country in the world has half its population on anti-depressents.

      I went to see a doctor the other day about a sore ankle and about wanting to lose weight. She ignored that and asked me if I was happy. I said no. She promptly prescribed me an antidepressant and told me that 30% to 40% of her patients were on anti-depressants and that 25% of the average doctor's patients were on anti-depressants.  And, no, I absolutely did not want them. What's wrong with a little strength of character about solving the issues instead of being chemically dependent?

      That's not happiness, my dear. The writer of the article was correct. Americans theink they're happy when they're actually comfortable.

      1. prettydarkhorse profile image60
        prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        We have different set of friends. I talk to different people - close friends (immigrants and non immigrants) from parents of children I am tutoring to some who are just acquaintances. Some are bubbly and friendly. I don't know if deep inside them they are happy or not. That is difficult to measure BTW. I tend to go with data rather than few accounts of people.


        You should have basic comfort first in order for one to be happy. Depends on wants, could you say since we are capitalist country, needless to say you are successful if to some extent you can actually get what you want - consumerism.



        I want to see a data. You need to factor in doctors - dependency on them, prescriptions and how pharma companies earn from this.




        Happiness is subjective, first you must satisfy basic needs!

        1. profile image0
          Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Prettydarkhorse. I'm sorry, but you can take the contents of the article, or leave it.  I truly don't care. And I'm done with arguing about it. There are none so blind as those who will not see.

          What I find fascinating is this absolute refusal to see anything negative about your own country. You have to defend it every moment. People who are comfortable in their own skins don't have the kind of response.

          1. prettydarkhorse profile image60
            prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            That is an opinion article (personal blog) Sophia, c'mon now ;-). I am not saying USA is perfect. Some points in the article might be true, but generalizations like that arising from one article does not do it for me in terms of my experiences here and data wise. We have different experiences.

            Peace, you are a friend and we agree to disagree. :-)

            1. profile image0
              Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Yes, it is an opinion piece, but it is an educated opinion.

              I think there is an enormous misunderstanding of what opinion is.

              Do you remember in old time newspaper there was always the editorial? This was the editor's opinion. But it was based on a thorough knowledge of the events of the day.

              Opinion is based on evidence and deductive logic. It is not what one feels and believes.

              smile

              1. prettydarkhorse profile image60
                prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Opinion is a belief and is usually subjective - they are personal Mam :-)

                Some people just want to believe what they want to believe while others used more data to defend their belief. it is still a belief and is subjective.

                When it comes to editorial, credibility counts!

                1. profile image0
                  Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Pretty Dark Horse, look at the legal sense of the word. That is where the word has been derived from. It has just lost its meaning in the dumbing down of the population in which people have been taught that everybody is entitled to an opinion...

                  I won't give you my opinion on that. smile

                  1. prettydarkhorse profile image60
                    prettydarkhorseposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    That is a condescending response! That is my opinion, BTW.

                    Of course everybody is entitled to their own opinion/belief!

                    Adios! Nice talking to you.

          2. rebekahELLE profile image88
            rebekahELLEposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            The article is the opinion of the writer who is trying to sell his books...  while there is some truth to what he states, there are broad generalizations about Americans as a whole which simply aren't true.  I can't understand why people only want to see what's perceived as 'wrong'. 
            I've said this before in one of your threads, and I'll repeat it.  America is a very big country with many different kinds of people with diverse cultural backgrounds. For some reason, you seem to have an 'us against them' attitude toward America.  Everyone I know greets one another with a hug and kiss.  We greet people we haven't seen since yesterday or years ago the same way.  We are happy to see each other.  I constantly see people hugging each other and holding hands, etc.  Because everyone doesn't greet each other with this kind of affection doesn't mean Americans aren't affectionate and loving.  Maybe they are more conditioned to show their affection in private. 
            Young people I know and interact with are intelligent and study hard.  They want to learn more and excel.
            They succeed and move forward to important positions in their jobs and careers.  They are more tolerant than previous generations and travel more.  I could go on and on, but it won't make a difference. 
            While there are plenty of things America could do better, there are so many things it does right.  The ten things really don't matter anyway.  The author was targeting his audience.

            1. profile image0
              Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Rebekah, I'm just curious. Where exactly do you live? In a small town stuck away in the middle of nowhere? Are you on G+? Please take a look at the millions of Americans who are outraged about the things I talk about. And they talk about them 24/7. There are highly educated, reasonably successful people. They talk about them, for the same reason that I talk about them, that if we don't talk about them, they will silde underneath the table.

              Note, they're all Americans. They own businesses. They have multiple degrees. Oh, yes, and I suppose I better say it, they're liberals.

              And they're talking about it even more than I am.

              So, I'm sorry, I'm not tlaking about these things because I hate America. I am talking about them because they need talking about. And they're not trying to sell books.

              And the reason why I keep bringing up the fact that America is NOT the best country is that because while people actually believe it to be true, they will carry on doing nothing about the grave injustcies in this country. I mean did you read the fiction that America has the highest number of incarcerations in the world because they have the highest standards? Are they joking? They have the higest number of incarcerations because imprisonment is a private industry and people are making profits out of it.

      2. wilderness profile image93
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Let me throw a different "interpretation" of the data on anti-depressents at you, see what you think of it.  I agree with your experience that doctors will almost automatically prescribe these drugs, and have had the same experience you have with a family doctor.  A high percentage of people I know are using them.  It stems from both a push by drug companies, and from being an easy way out for the doctor and patient both.

        But.  The interpretation I get from this is not that Americans are particularly unhappy.  It is that Americans as a whole have become enamored of mind altering drugs, from alcohol to marijuana to anti-depressents to ADD "corrective" drugs such as Ritalin.  While I fully understand and agree that there is a small percentage of people, adults and children, that actually do need chemical help to control themselves, it is far, far under the percentage that use these chemicals.

        Americans have decided that they wish to live their lives floating on a placid pond, away from the turbulence of the active sea of life.  They don't want to have to work to control their emotions, they want the easy way out of chemical dependency.  They don't want reality, they want a perception of reality that is easier to deal with. It makes them "comfortable" if not truly happy and, just as you say, they are mistaking one for the other, although I do understand the desire even as I decline to participate.

        Why?  Perhaps because American life is so full of stress.  One of your posts indicate that Americans spend more of their life working than almost every other developed country, and job stress can be high.  Perhaps because the continual fight to "keep up with the Joneses" is so strong.  Perhaps because the fight to be accepted by everyone for what they want to see rather than what we are is prevalent.  Perhaps because, more than any other country, America is a melting pot of cultures and we are trying hard to work through the difficulties of living in close proximity with our differences; stress again and stress that we do not know how to correct.

        Most likely, IMHO though, is sheer laziness; Americans have found an easy way to float through the rough spots without exerting themselves, without accepting that that life is a fight, without accepting personal responsibility to control their own actions and destiny.

        I see it as a major problem, but few will agree.  It is not very PC to say that someone taking these drugs doesn't need them; far more pleasant to drug ourselves into a semi-stupor and just float along, particularly when it is a rowdy child that we don't want to work to raise.

  11. TB Bullock profile image60
    TB Bullockposted 4 years ago

    That was a very interesting and entertaining article to read. However, there are a few things that make America the best country in the world that have been overlooked. Of course we didn't invent modern democracy, but can the argument not be made that we perfected it? There is no French revolution or Spanish inquisition situation that would be tolerated in America. In addition, we provide more relief for humanitarian causes than any other country in the world (look the actual numbers up). After both world wars, we gave more aid than any other country did in efforts to rebuild Europe (again, please look this up). Our military presence in South Korea prevents a nation from being subjugated to the whims of North Korea (something that no other nation seems to take an interest in), and we saved China from being occupied by a bloody Japanese regime in WW2. When we wage war on other countries, we seem to be the only country that at least attempts to not involve civilians. Our incarceration rates are higher because our laws are stricter, and when did it become wrong to believe one's country is the best? Is ambition a bad thing? Should the poor simply resign themselves to their fate or is it better to believe they are destined for better things? I agree with many points in this article, but I must ask one question. If we aren't the greatest country in the world, who is?

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      No, sorry, you can't make the argument that you perfected democracy. There are still too many holes in American democracy.

      The fact that there is no chance of a French Revolution or even Spanish Inquisition are further minus points to your score. A major part of democracy is being able to rise up and object to to your leaders.

      You actually didn't give more aid after WWII, you sold it. Here in the UK we have only just paid our debt to you. Don't get me wrong, I'm not ungrateful, just object to being told we were given what we were lent.

      The only problem with believing that your country is the best is that it means every other country is worse, patently not true. I am far happier living in the UK than I would be living in America, I have tried both though my stay in the US was limited.

      I suspect that for the vast majority of people the greatest country in the world is the one that they live in.

      1. wilderness profile image93
        wildernessposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Your last paragraph is probably the most telling of all and is the key to the matter, it seems to me.

        Years ago I read a report saying that a high percentage of Russian immigrants didn't stay.  Without a govt telling them where to live, where to work and which car to buy they weren't happy.  Enormous choices of food at the store were difficult to pick from.  How to choose a TV was an overwhelming task.  They wanted and needed someone else to run their daily lives for them - it's all they ever knew and they didn't know how to cope with having to do it themselves.

        True or not, it illustrates your point well.  In general, people want the society and government they have.  No one is ever happy with all the facets of that society, but in general they like it.  They get used to what it does or doesn't provide and it becomes natural and necessary to them.  How other cultures live and operate becomes strange and unacceptable, populated with people that obviously don't know what is "good" or "bad", "right" or "wrong".  Only their ethics and morals are "right"; all other cultures are "wrong" and should change how they operate.

        We all live in the "best" country.

      2. profile image0
        Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        John Holden, until I came to the USA, I had never in my entire life heard people say so consistently that their country is the best country in the word and brag so much about so little as I have in the USA.  I don't agree with your statement that everybody thinks they live in the Best country in the world. I've lived in too many countries where people are trying to live in it.

        Oh, wait, I lie.

        In pre-apartheid South Africa, Afrikaaners kept telling me they lived in the best country in the world, that God gave them South Africa and that people with black skins had the mark of Cain on them (the black skin) and that they would be servants all the days of their lives. They insisted that South Africa had the best of everything. It always boggled my mind. They told me that they didn't have to travel because South Africa contained the best in the world.

        Of course, we know know that WAMs (White Afrikaans Males) are an endangered species and they might be rethinking what they said.

        I don't think everybody thinks that they live in the best country in the world - otherwise people wouldn't immigrate. I think people who have a strong need to 'be the best' have a strong need to think that they are the best in everything.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I did say "the vast majority" and not everybody.

          Take the UK where a good percentage of the population could afford to immigrate to the US (and qualify) but don't, because they are happy living here.

          And I also think that people who think that their country has to be the best in everything are rather superficial.

          1. profile image0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Okay, well, yes. Your last comment says it all. It's also the driving need to say it's the best. There is something very, very wrong with this kind of ego. The fact that so many people here take issue with my making the statement that the USA is not the best country in the world reflects just how deep this need is within the psyche of far too many people.

        2. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          "until I came to the USA, I had never in my entire life heard people say so consistently that their country is the best country in the word and brag so much about so little as I have in the USA."

          Sorry you have so little, maybe its your fault? How many countries have you lived in where YOU couldn't succeed?

          1. profile image0
            Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            73Repairguy47, I find it interestinyg that your only means of defence is that of an ad hominem attack. Shoot the messenger. Don't use logical deduction to prove a point.

            I've lived and worked in six countries, nine cities, on three continents and lost count of the number I have traveled to.

            What I have suceeded in? That's such a strange question from a guy who has one hub and nothing more. Google me sometime.

      3. TB Bullock profile image60
        TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        What are the holes? And when we rise up to our leaders, they don't brutally murder us (since the revolution at least). Additionally, what do you mean by "sold"? I would also say that there's a lot of room for debate and speculation surrounding what exactly "worse" and "best" mean here, so I'll drop that point altogether. I do, however, agree with you that the vast majority of people do probably think their country is the best. I mean no antagonism towards the U.K., I hold nothing but respect for all that they have accomplished.

        1. profile image0
          Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          No, they imprison them and silence them in other ways. Why do you think that Bradley Manning is in solitary confinment and America has the highest incarcerration rate per capita in the world/ It's not because your'e a democratic country and have great freedom. It's because your prison system is privatized and people want to make money out of imprisoing other people. So they lobby congress to make laws that will ensure more and more people go to prison.

          1. TB Bullock profile image60
            TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Silence them in other ways? What exactly does that mean? And we have a higher incarceration rate because we have stricter laws and more effective police methods. Who exactly are these mysterious figures that shape laws to incarcerate more people so that some other unseen party can make a profit off of it? Can you back any of this up with any actual hard facts?

            1. profile image0
              Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

              No, you don't have higher standards. You have lower standards. You incarcerate people for things that no civilized nation in the world would incarcerate someone for. It's not legitimate to incarcerate someone for taking drugs, and just so you know, I have a very low opinion of people who take drugs and I have never used them. However, if they want to take them, they shouldn't be imprisoned for them. That is not a 'high' standard. It's a sign of an authoritive government that thinks it has the right to tell people how to live their lives.

              1. TB Bullock profile image60
                TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                I actually agree with you, our government has entirely too much power. However, I didn't say "higher standards", I said stricter laws.

                1. John Holden profile image60
                  John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  No, not stricter laws, harsher punishments.

                  1. TB Bullock profile image60
                    TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    We have insanely strict alcohol laws and our crimes are certainly more violent, therefore needing harsher punishments. I'm not claiming this is the ideal system, but that's how it is. We (modern Americans) know that although we played a part in the victory in Europe, we are not solely responsible for winning that theater. However, we are responsible for winning the war in the Pacific theater.

    2. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      None of these things make America the 'best' country. America is just like any other country. It's good at some things and better at other things. In the things that matter to most people - a living wage, available medical care, solid education, etc.

      Is there anything wrong with believing America is the best country? Well, I guess there is absolutely nothing wrong with being delusional either. It's just not helpful.

      1. TB Bullock profile image60
        TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I have a great job, a great doctor, and am currently attending a great university. Is it really your place to sit in judgment on me and the entire country for holding opinions that they are completely entitled to? Does having an opinion that you disagree with automatically mean that whoever holds that opinion is delusional? I'm just not sure why it's wrong for people to believe in their country or why it is of any concern to anybody else.

        1. John Holden profile image60
          John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          I had a great job, a great doctor, and people come from all over the world to study at our universities!

          Can you explain to me how America is better at all those things?

          1. TB Bullock profile image60
            TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            No I can't explain that, because it isn't necessarily the case. It seemed implied in the comment I was responding to that no Americans enjoyed any of these things. Sorry for the confusion.

  12. John Holden profile image60
    John Holdenposted 4 years ago

    TB, you say Additionally, what do you mean by "sold"?

    I think many Americans have forgotten, or probably don't know, that we paid you to get involved in WWII. We finally paid off that debt in the last ten years or so.

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      John, no they don't. And they also honestly believe that they won the war for the UK....

    2. TB Bullock profile image60
      TB Bullockposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      I may be misunderstanding you here, but if you payed America to get involved, then why would the U.K. have been in debt? We got involved when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.

      1. John Holden profile image60
        John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        We paid on the never never!  You know, x pounds down and fifty odd years at Y pounds!
        And yes, this was all despite Pearl Harbour.

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          "What? Over? Did you say "over"? Nothing is over until we decide it is! Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor? Hell no!".

          John "Bluto" Blutarsky
          A great American

          1. John Holden profile image60
            John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            What the **** are you on about?

            1. Repairguy47 profile image60
              Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

              Rewriting history.

              1. John Holden profile image60
                John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                Well it's what your country men are very good at doing so carry on the good work rewriting history.

                1. Repairguy47 profile image60
                  Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  The winners GET to rewrite history, sorry bout your luck.

                2. Hollie Thomas profile image61
                  Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                  Oh come on John, you have to hand it to Repairguy, even without realising he exemplifies beautifully the point of this thread. smile

                  1. John Holden profile image60
                    John Holdenposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Oh absolutely!
                    You could almost believe he does it deliberately.

                  2. Repairguy47 profile image60
                    Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Without realizing it? Sorry you don't seem to get the humor, nothing unusual.

                  3. profile image0
                    Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

                    Indeed, he does. sad

  13. Hollie Thomas profile image61
    Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago

    Ok Repairguy, whatever you say.

    1. paradigmsearch profile image84
      paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Let's play today. big_smile

      1. Hollie Thomas profile image61
        Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        big_smile

        1. paradigmsearch profile image84
          paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Proceed to lab rat thread so as to not hijack this one.

  14. Will Apse profile image87
    Will Apseposted 4 years ago

    Tell a population that they are the greatest nation in the world and you can get away with paying them less. You can also get them to engage in ruinous wars. Happens everywhere.

  15. paradigmsearch profile image84
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago
    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Yup. For the record, I don't go looking for these things. I find them on Google plus where Americans post them.

  16. paradigmsearch profile image84
    paradigmsearchposted 4 years ago

    And around 100 Americans, and other folks, at their absolute best.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhyMvQ_N7Zc

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Totally, absolutely awesome. smile

  17. tammybarnette profile image60
    tammybarnetteposted 4 years ago

    Thank you for posting this article, the video almost made me cry. I have been saying we are the smallest child, entitled, spoiled brat nation of the world for a very long time. We worry about the silliest things, we eat too much, we do not excercise enough, we do not teach our children well,etc etc! We will seal our own doom if we do not awaken the masses. Thank you for sharing smile

    1. profile image0
      Sophia Angeliqueposted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Tammy, it starts with the kids. The greatest casualty in women working is that children are no longer taught ethics, showen what strength of character is, etc. People do not value intellect, ethics, etc. anymore because parents never taught it or showed it in their homes. They were too busy earning money. It's a great loss to our communites. One of the reasons so many Americans are unaware of how badly America compares to other countries is because they are uninformed. I'm trying to rectify this by posting these links (which I get from other Americans posting them on G+). If you'd like to follow me on G+ my name is Tessa Schlesinger and you can find other people who write about the same thing because we all write about the same things! wink

    2. Repairguy47 profile image60
      Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

      Spoiled brat nation? Jeeeeeesus, when some country is having a crisis they call us, when some third world dictator starts sabre rattling our phone rings off the hook. Why don't you go tell those service members just how spoiled they are.

      1. Hollie Thomas profile image61
        Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        Get a grip, or an education. When the US and their powerful lobbyists want their own way they put pressure on your president, whoever that might be. The results are always the same; the US threatens to withdraw funding from particular nations who do not conform-why do the US fund those nations? Because those nations have been pillaged and raped by bankers and corporations who steal resources, and fund any despot who's willing to deny human rights and create human misery. A dependent nation is a compliant one.

        And no, I'm not unhappy nor am I poor. Just a thinker, you should try it some time.

        1. Repairguy47 profile image60
          Repairguy47posted 4 years ago in reply to this

          Unhappy for sure.

          1. Hollie Thomas profile image61
            Hollie Thomasposted 4 years ago in reply to this

            Dumbed down for sure.

      2. profile image0
        Emile Rposted 4 years ago in reply to this

        I wouldn't waste the time. People love to complain about America. It's easier than keeping an eye on their own country, or taking responsibility.

        1. gmwilliams profile image82
          gmwilliamsposted 3 years ago in reply to this

          YOU SAID IT!

  18. jcales profile image63
    jcalesposted 4 years ago

    Good read. Although, this news and trend is a decade old or so in the making. Corruption & greed have overtaken progress. You have major financial scandals every 10 years in the U.S., and all the other stuff the speaker talks about. Ask yourself, Is any of it getting better?

  19. tirelesstraveler profile image83
    tirelesstravelerposted 3 years ago

    The biggest thing Americans don't know is history.

    1. John Holden profile image60
      John Holdenposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Bigger than geography?

 
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