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Would your opinion of entitlements (as you call them) be different if?

  1. movingout profile image60
    movingoutposted 4 years ago

    1. you lost your job
    2. were unable to afford private health insurance and needed it
    3. lost your home
    4. couldn't find a job
    5. had children and themselves to feed
    6. can't afford to operate a vehicle

    My point here is simple: Unless you walked the walk of so many Americans affected by this Recession, don't be so quick to condemn them! Many were middle class folks, living the American Dream, and thru no fault of their own, find themselves in this situation! It's easy to be a backyard quarterback when your not in the game!

    1. profile image67
      logic,commonsenseposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      First of all, I wouldn't put myself in position to lose my job.
      I would make sure I had a job that took care of my insurance.
      I wouldn't put myself in position to lose my home.
      If I had children I would make sure they were fed an sheltered first.
      I wouldn't put myself in position to not be able to afford to operate a vehicle.
      Personal responsibility would preclude painting yourself into a corner.  It's all about choices.  If you are willing to do whatever it takes to stay above water, you will be successful more times than not.
      Any time we put ourselves in a position to fail, it is our fault.
      I am always looking for a better job.  Always preparing myself to be versatile enough to be capable of doing more than one thing.
      I brought myself up from virtually nothing to the point where I make a relatively comfortable living.  I didn't make excuses, I didn't expect taxpayers to bail me out, and I didn't feel sorry for myself if things didn't work out.  I got up and started over, more determined to succeed with each failure.
      Self pity and blaming others gets you nowhere.

      1. Josak profile image60
        Josakposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Naivete and ignorance never get us anywhere. Your whole comment is utterly devoid of a grounding in reality, anyone can be pushed into poverty by a sweep of bad luck no matter how hard one works or how skilled one is, ie. I had a good friend whose employing company closed during the recession and who soon after was diagnosed with cancer.

        The attitude represented is that of those who have been privileged and fortunate enough to never experience such disaster and lack the imagination or intelligence to grasp how easily it can happen to anyone, unfortunately such people only "get it" after it happens to them.

      2. movingout profile image60
        movingoutposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        @logic,commonsense! You live in a dream world. If the company you work for decided to close tomorrow you could easily find yourself without a lot ot things. Especially if you're older. Most employers want younger workers. I hope and pray you never find yourself "let go" for an outsourced job or plant/company closing! Because if you do, you may just have a different opinion.

  2. rontlog profile image87
    rontlogposted 4 years ago

    It can easily happen to any of us.
    I live in the UK.  Someone I know recently left a good managerial job to join another company. Unfortunately, their new employer went bust three months later - she was left without a job and didn't get redundancy pay. Despite applying for several full time jobs,she was only able to get a part-time job that doesn't pay enough money to cover the bills. Her savings eventually ran out, she had also used up all her credit/overdraft facility. It got to the point where she had no money for food.
    I told her about food banks, but she wouldn't go, she said they were for people who were worse off than her. I said, you have no money for food, how much worse can it get.  She wouldn't go, so in the end a group of us put a box of food together for her. (It was interesting that three people I asked to contribute said no, as they were struggling themselves and couldn't even afford to give her a small amount - all in their mid 40's - they had their own financial problems).
    The problem is, most workers are used to working and when they loose a job, they think they will quickly get another one. Several months later, she is still looking for full-time work.
    She recently went to social services for help, (which is where she should have gone when she first lost her job),  and they were able to pay her some money, but not enough to cover her rent, so she has had to negotiate a large reduction with her landlord.

    What was most interesting was that this person didn't have much of a clue where to turn for help, or know  what help was available, as she always had relied on jobs being available for money. Even more shocking was when I realised I didn't have much of a clue either.

    So I learned a few lessons here:
    - Check out the financial situation of a new employer before you agree to join them.
    - If you live in the UK, as soon as you loose a job, go straight to social services for help, as it may take months to find another well paying job.
    - If the jobs aren't available, you will eventually be forced to downscale your lifestyle.
    - Other people are facing their own financial struggles and may not be able to help you.
    - If you have a job, follow the usual good advice of saving up an amount equivalent to six months of expenses, as it will help if you ever loose your job.
    - Keep your overheads low and stay out of bad consumer debt.
    - Have more than one source of regular income.
    - There are food banks, usually run by churches,  if you ever get really desperate.
    - Keep your self healthy, so you are fit to work if you need to.

    Lastly, none of us is entitled to a job.

  3. rontlog profile image87
    rontlogposted 4 years ago

    It can easily happen to any of us.
    I live in the UK.  Someone I know recently left a good managerial job to join another company. Unfortunately, their new employer went bust three months later - she was left without a job and didn't get redundancy pay. Despite applying for several full time jobs,she was only able to get a part-time job that doesn't pay enough money to cover the bills. Her savings eventually ran out, she had also used up all her credit/overdraft facility. It got to the point where she had no money for food.
    I told her about food banks, but she wouldn't go, she said they were for people who were worse off than her. I said, you have no money for food, how much worse can it get.  She wouldn't go, so in the end a group of us put a box of food together for her. (It was interesting that three people I asked to contribute said no, as they were struggling themselves and couldn't even afford to give her a small amount - all in their mid 40's - they had their own financial problems).
    The problem is, most workers are used to working and when they loose a job, they think they will quickly get another one. Several months later, she is still looking for full-time work.
    She recently went to social services for help, (which is where she should have gone when she first lost her job),  and they were able to pay her some money, but not enough to cover her rent, so she has had to negotiate a large reduction with her landlord.

    What was most interesting was that this person didn't have much of a clue where to turn for help, or know  what help was available, as she always had relied on jobs being available for money. Even more shocking was when I realised I didn't have much of a clue either.

    So I learned a few lessons here:
    - Check out the financial situation of a new employer before you agree to join them.
    - If you live in the UK, as soon as you loose a job, go straight to social services for help, as it may take months to find another well paying job.
    - If the jobs aren't available, you will eventually be forced to downscale your lifestyle.
    - Other people are facing their own financial struggles and may not be able to help you.
    - If you have a job, follow the usual good advice of saving up an amount equivalent to six months of expenses, as it will help if you ever loose your job.
    - Keep your overheads low and stay out of bad consumer debt.
    - Have more than one source of regular income.
    - There are food banks, usually run by churches,  if you ever get really desperate.
    - Keep your self healthy, so you are fit to work if you need to.

    Lastly, none of us is entitled to a job.

    1. CASE1WORKER profile image78
      CASE1WORKERposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Um its not social services- try JobCentre Plus!

      I worked at the Jobcentre/Benefits Agency for a very long time and agree that sometimes people find themselves in circumstances that they cannot prepare for.

      I used to meet and greet people and some who had lost their jobs after 20 plus years were shell shocked their way of life just gone.

      Getting a job can be hard whatever your age but it always seems easier once you have a job to get another. After being severed it took me nearly two years to find a job that I was happy with and paid some twenty per cent less than my previous job..

      My daughter is a teacher- there is a national shortage- still it took six months to get off temping and then on a two term only contract- her best friend graduated last summer, only just got a job

      It is hard out there but there is a lot of hope and people are getting on. If you lose your job ask your friends and relations as some may know of a suitable job- i

      Food banks- yes churches often run these- take from them when you need but give back when you dont.

      Above all take the help that is available and try to get some form of employment so that you dont become just another statistic

  4. rontlog profile image87
    rontlogposted 4 years ago

    @ Case1worker - thank you for clarifying that it is JobCentrePlus that UK people need to go to if they find themselves suddenly out of work.

 
working