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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (15 posts)

I saw a Confederate flag this weekend . . . at a Confederate Memorial.

  1. The Dirt Farmer profile image97
    The Dirt Farmerposted 2 years ago

    http://usercontent2.hubimg.com/12565881_f520.jpg
    As we were coming back from Point Lookout State Park in Southern Maryland this weekend, we passed a park dedicated to the Confederate soldiers who'd been held at a prison camp nearby during the Civil War. The Confederate flag holds pride of place at the center of the memorial. It flies higher than the other flags there, including the US flag. Should Confederate flags be removed from public memorials as well as government buildings? Or are they merely historical in this context?

    1. wilderness profile image97
      wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      No, the confederate flag needs not be removed from a confederate memorial.  But it should also always fly at a lower height than the stars and stripes.  That's common flag etiquette in this country and the people that operate this memorial should know it.

      1. Faith Reaper profile image87
        Faith Reaperposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I agree, it should not be removed, but it should not be hire than the US flag.

    2. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      This is historical in context and flag is appropriate where it is. It needs to be subordinated to the national flag. Otherwise  it should not be flying on government builidings and public property  However, public memorials relevant to the Civil War and the Confederacy, should be no problem.

      1. wilderness profile image97
        wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Uh oh!  It's going to snow in Miami today!  smile

        1. Credence2 profile image79
          Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          No problem, we have plenty of fair weather here. Also plenty of Confederate flags waving proudly from the back of your typical pickup truck here in ole' Dixie.

      2. GA Anderson profile image80
        GA Andersonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Wilderness is seeing snow, I just see backpedaling.

        Come on Cred. Is it purely a negative symbol of hatred and racism to you all the time, or just times where you think it is inappropriate.

        ps. I will have a piece from the center with not too much icing.

        GA

    3. profile image60
      globalstatelawposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I believe there is still a kind of mole inside trying to bring USA down

    4. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Sorry DF, I should clarify display of the flag at relevant public monuments is ok, much like it would be acceptable in a State museum or municipal art gallery.

  2. ThelmaC profile image96
    ThelmaCposted 2 years ago

    It is absolutely appropriate for it to fly at the location you described.  But, as others have said here, it should be flying below the American flag.

  3. CassandraCae profile image86
    CassandraCaeposted 2 years ago

    That there are even memorials for traitors of the United States is beyond me.  It makes no sense.  That being said the flag should be part of the memorial, not flying proudly anywhere near our flag.

    1. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      This is done In the spirit of national reconciliation in response to this tragic event. Despite their insurrection, they remain Americans still and part of the tapestry of our shared history.

    2. GA Anderson profile image80
      GA Andersonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      "Traitors" is a strong word. Considering the Southern white population was about 5 million vs. 18.5 Northern population, that's a lot of traitors.

      Do you also feel the War of Independence generals and leaders were traitors?

      It is called a civil war for a reason.

      GA

    3. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      "With malice toward none and charity for all", this is what Abraham Lincoln said when he invited the rebellous states back into the Union at his inaugural in March, 1865.

      So,  I figure that if so great a man can be so gracious toward a vanquished enemy after 4 years of bitter conflict,  I, in response should be able to see my way clear to move on after 150 years. This in honor of the memory of  Mr. Lincoln, and his vision. I take his advice as to how he intended us to relate to one another after the guns were finally silent.

  4. ThelmaC profile image96
    ThelmaCposted 2 years ago

    CassandraCae I have never thought of the Confederate soldiers as traitors.  You have an interesting point of view. I have to admit that I had to look at your profile to see where you are from.

 
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