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How do you avoid fake news?

  1. dianetrotter profile image73
    dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago

    Evan mullins gave four suggestions:
    1.  Examine the source  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_f … s_websites  Did you
         you know some sources are spoofing to make it seem like they are CNN, MSNBC, ABC.
         Interesting list - minor differences in URLs
    2.  Check your shock level
          Is it inconsistent with known facts.  Verify it before you share it.
    3.  Consult Google or maybe Bing
          Are other outlets covering it?  Editors race to be the first to cover a good story.  If no one
          else if covering it, you can't Google it, etc.
    4.  Compensate for media bias
         Vary your sources.  I listen to CNN and Fox

    1. GA Anderson profile image83
      GA Andersonposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

      Hi Diane, the FCC made spotting fake news easy, back in 2014. They required all published content that was not certified to display their new "Not Verified" logo in the disclaimer and trademarks section of their publications:

      https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13692951.png

      Televised medias were required to show it in the bottom right corner of their images, and audio medias were required to reference an FCC disclaimer.

      Pres. Obama rescinded that policy in 2015, but it is probable that Pres. trump will reinstate it.

      GA

      1. dianetrotter profile image73
        dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

        You are kidding right!  There's no reason to tell a lie and then label it a lie. i just Googled it.  I found nothing.  Are you trying to pull my leg???

        BTW, do you think Obama had Trump Tower wiretapped.  Sessions wouldn't even back that one up for him.

        1. GA Anderson profile image83
          GA Andersonposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

          Diane, I learned my lesson early on. I once pulled someone else's leg, and it turned out to be a prosthetic. I nearly messed myself.

          GA
          https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13692971.png

          1. dianetrotter profile image73
            dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

            That'll teach you.  I have a thing or two I can't publish.

      2. Tim Truzy info4u profile image85
        Tim Truzy info4uposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

        Thanks,GA. That's encouraging because that would give me two things to like this president for. (The first was going to the Dems and working out some progress for victims of the hurricanes without telling his party.)
        I examine all of my sources (NY times, Washington post, (Yes) Rush and Glen Beck, BBC, CBC, and the Australian Broadcasting network, many magazine articles on the topic, CNN versus Fox, various contacts in my state legislature, and common sense.
        Our founding fathers made it clear: a functioning successful democracy needs informed citizens. News should never be fake, but we have to use some common sense in distinguishing it when it is.
        Some will say: I don't have that sort of time, but democracy is time consuming. It's the way it works.

    2. RJ Schwartz profile image91
      RJ Schwartzposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

      I don't think it's possible to avoid fake news anymore.  I think that we even get unintended fake (or incomplete) news because everyone is in such a rush to publish before the next person.  Research isn't being done and errors occurring.

      My personal approach is - multiple sources, real research on the background and players involved, and a healthy dose of common sense

      1. dianetrotter profile image73
        dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

        When people forward info to me, I research and then send them info explaining why it is fake.  If everyone would check before forwarding, there would be less of a problem.

        Some people trust because it is coming from someone they know.  Bad idea!

      2. dianetrotter profile image73
        dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

        Common sense might mean not being so hard on other people when they get it wrong.  This is one of today's fiascos.


        Trump’s Social Media Director Tweets a Fake Irma Video, Is Fact-Checked by Miami Airport

        http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/ … eo_is.html

  2. Kathleen Cochran profile image86
    Kathleen Cochranposted 2 weeks ago

    Have more than one news source.  Have more than one news source.  Have more than one news source.
    And understand the difference between news and commentary.

    1. dianetrotter profile image73
      dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

      I think know something about the editors, publishers and owners helps.  It seems more important as we venture into social media that we know as much as possible about those behind the scenes and their views.

      1. MizBejabbers profile image91
        MizBejabbersposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

        Back when I was studying journalism everyone was howling about the "liberal" news media (don't they always?). We did a survey in one of my classes as to the owners of the major medias, including the major newspapers of the day. Surprising to us, a majority of the owners of the liberal media were billionaire conservatives. When we asked the instructor his opinion on that, he said it was how they stayed billionaires, that making and keeping their money by stirring up dissension was more important than pushing their own conservative agendas. That was in the late 1980s, so I don't know whether that would hold true today.

        1. dianetrotter profile image73
          dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

          I hadn't heard of Alex Jones until the last year.  How can anyone be so cruel as to say Sandy Hook did not happen?  Evidentally, he actually believes that.  If that is true, it sounds like a personality disorder.  I'm not picking on him because of DJT.  There are nuts saying all kinds of stuff.

          A person was trying to explain to me about some rich family (forget the name) that is controlling everything that is going on.  I had heard of the family but not the theory.  I don't have enough room in my mind for garbage.

  3. Tim Truzy info4u profile image85
    Tim Truzy info4uposted 2 weeks ago

    You are right, Diane. Good advice. Who's paying for the spin. One news source I like to tune into is NPR. Usually, on their talk shows, they get conservatives and liberals, and let each give their thoughts on topics. I didn't find any information on what DJT was supposed to do with the FCC either, but it might be hidden - I might be checking fake news. (lol)

    1. GA Anderson profile image83
      GA Andersonposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

      Hi Tim, I didn't respond to your first comment because I was sure you would want the chance for a second look. ;-)

      GA

  4. Tim Truzy info4u profile image85
    Tim Truzy info4uposted 2 weeks ago

    It's o.k., we're all friends here. It really doesn't matter. They will tell us what they want us to know and dare us to find out the truth. No harm, no foul, my friend.

  5. Aime F profile image84
    Aime Fposted 2 weeks ago

    Check multiple reputable sources. Deciding what counts as "reputable" is a bit trickier when it comes to news media, but generally speaking if it strictly asserts liberal or conservative views then it's probably not entirely reputable. Also if you find that it sounds too good to be true (like hard evidence that Trump and Putin had a peepee hooker party) and it's only being reported by one source (or other sources all referencing the same source), then you probably shouldn't get your hopes up.

    And most importantly, if it's been anywhere near Alex Jones, it stinks and you should throw it out.

    1. dianetrotter profile image73
      dianetrotterposted 2 weeks ago in reply to this

      The tricky thing is determine a liberal source from a conservative source. 

      Usually when I look at Fox, they talk about completely different things from CNN.  Some things they mention but don't have all day coverage.  I think that is one think that makes people call it fake news - all day coverage.

      I like watching panels when they have people that discuss from different points of view.  However, there may be a panel of 5 and only one has an alternate view.

      Years ago, it was so easy to listen to the news but it was boring.

 
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