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Missing an Opportunity?

  1. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    Is Obama missing an opportunity by not coming out more vocally and forecfully in support of the protesters in Iran?

    Here's a case where those public speaking skills might come in handy.

    Seeing the US president unequivocally state our support for their bid for real democratic reform in Iran might have a very significant effect on the protesters and events there. Or, maybe it would have no effect. Or, it could backfire if the protests peter out and relations end up that much worse. In any case, it seems a ripe moment to state our support for democracy.

    Thoughts?

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      He did make his "thoughts" known. He went and had ice cream with his daughters during the heat of the action - AND - he asked reporters to come along with him, just to make sure no one missed his "point".

      1. tksensei profile image61
        tksenseiposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        A bold statesman.

      2. nicomp profile image57
        nicompposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Bush was vilified for similar activities during the first day of the Katrina aftermath.

        1. profile image0
          Madame Xposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Yeah, but that's not the issue here. With all of Obama's eloquence, why does he not comment, at the very least, on the struggle these people are having for their own freedom?

          1. profile image0
            pgrundyposted 8 years ago in reply to this

            Today he did.

            But more to the point, 1) this isn't about us, and 2) if he is too aggressive in his comments he actually hurts the people doing the protesting by accusing them of being backed by the U.S. and our suspect investment in the region.

            I think we should get our dog out of this fight and let the Iranians decide their own fate. They are doing that and doing it very well, and it's their right to do it. It's not up to us and it's a sign of how full our themselves so many Americans are that there is even this big need to make it about us.

            1. profile image0
              Madame Xposted 8 years ago in reply to this

              I don't completely agree with this statement pgrundy. In one way it is very much about us. We are still the world leader in freedom and many countries look to us to see what we'll do next. Obama has no problem ordering the Israelis about, but with Iran, he's mum. I don't think he is ignoring the issue. I think he's doing exactly what he believes is right. I just don't happen to agree with him.

              1. RKHenry profile image76
                RKHenryposted 8 years ago in reply to this

                I curious about something here.  When did Obama order Israel to do anything?  I must have missed it.

    2. RKHenry profile image76
      RKHenryposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      I don't think he is afraid to speak.  I think he is just patiently waiting.  What is happening over in Iran, is liberty and revolution.  I think he is smart to stand aside and wait it out.  Great subject matter!  Very interesting.

  2. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    I wonder if Obama is afraid to speak out more directly and forecefully in support of the protesters for fear of harming his hoped for negotiations with the Iranian regime.

  3. LondonGirl profile image88
    LondonGirlposted 8 years ago

    If the protestors are too strongly associated with the west, it won't do them any good, I reckon.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah, as long as they crawl like worms, they'll be safe.

  4. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    As things continue to escalate, we risk winding up on the wrong side of history. In the name of leaving open our options to negotiate with the current ruling regime? Could be a big mistake. In any case, being timid about our values in favor of a state sponsor of terrorism doesn't reflect well on us. Other nations - like France - have come out more clearly in support of the protestors than us so far.

  5. nicomp profile image57
    nicompposted 8 years ago

    He can't do what Bush did because he campaigned against that. Bush expressed concern for Kurds being murdered by the Hussein regime and that eventually became part of the basis for the invasion of Iraq.

  6. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    Sounds like a foreign policy based on cowardice.

    1. nicomp profile image57
      nicompposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      It's touch-feely Liberal/Progressive/Democrat slight-of-hand. If Obama sends in any type of military force, he'll be doing it because it's the "right thing to do", not because he's in bed with the Nasty Oil Companies as Bush was portrayed.

      Clinton sent troops all over the world. Bosnia, Somalia, Haiti, and he authorized the bombing of Yugoslavia. For the final two years of Clinton's administration U.S. aircraft routinely attacked hostile Iraqi anti-air installations inside the Iraqi no-fly zones.

      However, since he was a Liberal/Progressive/Democrat, he got a free pass, unlike Bush.

    2. profile image0
      pgrundyposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Yeah maybe he should slobber "Death to Ahmadinejad!" and pump his fist up and down.

      That'll prove he's no pussy.

      1. utu profile image56
        utuposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Wooohoa only my second day on and this is getting heavy... I hate politics....... They are all as bad as each other.

      2. tksensei profile image61
        tksenseiposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        ............................

  7. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    Things in Tehran seem to still be on-going and very dangerous. The protesters deserve more support.

  8. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    And now Chavez is speaking out in support of the ruling regime. That says a lot.

    1. nicomp profile image57
      nicompposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      The guy that called Bush the Devil and embraced Danny Glover at the United Nations?

      1. tksensei profile image61
        tksenseiposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        The same.

  9. Uninvited Writer profile image81
    Uninvited Writerposted 8 years ago

    We have no idea what is going on in the background...not everything is reported to the media.

    Why do you ask these questions when you have already made up your mind? Be a man and state your opinions right out.

    1. tksensei profile image61
      tksenseiposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      LOL! I'll just bet you took the same approach to the previous administration! The shameless switch from "He's the devil and everything he does or says is an indication of deep conspiracy and pure evil!" to "No matter what he says or does he is pure and good and is the hope of the world and if you can't see that you just don't understand his secret plans for goodness!"

      It is becoming hilarious.

  10. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    To be fair, he has made comments, but they have been relatively timid and only gradually more clearly supportive of the protesters. This situation strikes me as a moment in history that requires real leadership, not cautious, measured political ass-covering. Perhaps we see now if he has it in him to be a leader and not just an empty suit. Stay tuned.

    1. profile image0
      Madame Xposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      "German chancellor Angela Merkel has urged the ruling regime in Tehran to allow a full recount of the disputed presidential elections of June 12. “Germany sides with those Iranians who want to exercise their right to freedom of expression and assembly”, Merkel declared on Sunday; making it one of the strongest messages sent by any Western leader to Iran so far. Chancellor Merkel also called on Tehran to allow peaceful demonstrations, to refrain from using force against protestors, and to release imprisoned opposition figures. “Human and civil rights have to be fully respected,” she stated. Merkel further demanded that restrictions placed on foreign media covering the widespread protests across Tehran and the rest of the country be lifted."

      WE used to be the ones championing freedom all over the world. I agree with your earlier comment "Sounds like a foreign policy based on cowardice."  And there is something in between
      ". . . . . maybe he should slobber "Death to Ahmadinejad!" and pump his fist up and down."
      and verbal support of those who are fighting for freedom.

  11. tksensei profile image61
    tksenseiposted 8 years ago

    Good post

  12. earnestshub profile image88
    earnestshubposted 8 years ago

    I am so pleased that Merkel is Chancellor of Germany, she is diplomatic but gets things said without being deliberately obtuse as Obama and others have been.Angela Merkel has shown uncommon sense in much that she has said.

 
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