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jump to last post 1-17 of 17 discussions (17 posts)

True/false : Time seems to fly faster EVERY year?

  1. Alpha-Authentic profile image40
    Alpha-Authenticposted 6 years ago

    True/false : Time seems to fly faster EVERY year?

    true for me, can't believe it!
    almost seems unreal. 2011 just went by so Da**m quickly!!

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6073685_f260.jpg

  2. KevinC9998 profile image79
    KevinC9998posted 6 years ago

    Oh yes, absolutely yes.  It seems like we were just counting down to Y2K.

  3. profile image0
    Home Girlposted 6 years ago

    Train of life starts speeding when you rich the 50th mark... you go down the hill from that.

  4. Pcunix profile image91
    Pcunixposted 6 years ago

    No, not for me.

    I think that time flying by can be caused by too much routine - too much repetition of the same old things.

    When I had a job I had to go to every day, I'd leave my house at different times and take different routes and do the same thing on the way home.  I'd go to different restaurants for lunch and try different foods.

    Later, I was on the road every day, so that was different.  Now, I mostly work out of my house, so I have to find other ways to make a difference in my day.  That's not always as easy, but some of the same tricks can work.  Even very small things, like buying a piece of exotic fruit or pouring orange juice into a coffee cup all serve to break the routine.

    These little things stamp more markers in our memory and slow down time.

  5. lovelife08 profile image60
    lovelife08posted 6 years ago

    Very, very true.  The older I get, the faster I get old! =\

  6. Attikos profile image79
    Attikosposted 6 years ago

    It's not the only element in perception of time, but as we get older we naturally measure each passing day against the sum of those that have gone before. When you're newborn, your first day is your whole life, the totality of experience. When you turn fifty, you've got over eighteen thousand of those days behind you, and as a part of your whole knowledge of time each of them is therefore shorter than that first one by a factor of many thousands. It's a wonder time doesn't seem to fly much more quickly.

  7. NiaLee profile image61
    NiaLeeposted 6 years ago

    Very true and some scientists explained that everyday is shorter of fractions of second every year. This is where science and religion meet: Islam says that at the end of time will be shorter, people will have closets full of clothes but walk around naked, people will be promiscuous in public eye, etc... and I am not trying to bring anybody into any creed, Promised!!!

  8. tlmcgaa70 profile image75
    tlmcgaa70posted 6 years ago

    i have always found it fascinating that there is still 24 hours in a day. or 48 if you count both night and day. time most definitely seem to be speeding by.

  9. xethonxq profile image64
    xethonxqposted 6 years ago

    Most definitely...as a kid it felt like the school year dragged on forever and I couldn't wait for summer. Now, as an adult I look up at the calendar and say, "Oh my God...Christmas or Easter or the fourth of July is right around the corner...what the hell?" lol It's just crazy.

  10. edhan profile image61
    edhanposted 6 years ago

    When I was young in school, time seemed crawling back.

    When I completed school, time began to fly back.

    Now I am already a parent of 2 children, days & years passes by so quickly as I watch my children growing up.

    The feeling of time slowly crawling back are felt by my children when they are schooling.

    Time is flying back quickly when you are actually involving in doing what you like.

  11. BizGenGirl profile image89
    BizGenGirlposted 6 years ago

    Actually, you might find this interesting - but time actually has started going faster. After the Haiti quake and Fukushima quake, the earths axis changed just minutely, and the earth started to spin just a tiny bit faster. It doesn't add up to a whole lot, maybe like 30 to 60 seconds faster. Still though, I thought that was pretty cool. smile

  12. hillymillydee profile image59
    hillymillydeeposted 6 years ago

    It is not time that is going fast it us who has a lot of things to do and don't have enough time to accomplish everything during the day.

    True, modern technology made everything faster and automatic  but it  created more complications and additional work that we need to spend time to learn it before we can proceed.  After we learn one, here comes another new one.

    We are no longer in the time that we just wake up in the morning drink a cup of coffee, go to the farm, come home in the evening, sit down with our family then sleep.

    Just in the evening alone, we watch TV, check our emails reply them, answer the phone. When we wake in the morning we rush for many things before going to work.

    And that's why we say time runs fast

  13. duffsmom profile image60
    duffsmomposted 6 years ago

    I find that as I get older, every year goes by faster.  When I was a child, I remember hearing adults talking about how fast summer went by - and to me it seemed to last forever.  So I think it has to do with our age.

  14. ptosis profile image77
    ptosisposted 6 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/6075632_f260.jpg

    The perception of time is based on memory. Maybe time memory is slower when as a child - who is in the duration-less 'now' more often than adults engaged in  grieving over the past or worrying about the future.

    Mood affects perception, the neurotransmitter dopamine changes the pulsing rate of neuron groups as in "time flies when you're having fun".

    Can try testing yourself with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI)

  15. Dorothee-Gy profile image69
    Dorothee-Gyposted 6 years ago

    How you perceive the length of time has always to do with your overall experience and your age.

    When you are little, a day is a huge part of your overall experience, and the older you get, the smaller the share becomes in comparison with all the days lived so far.

    When you're 5, every day feels nearly as long as your whole life, when you're 20, it still feels quite long, as it doesn't have too many days to compete with, but when you get older, it competes with everything you have lived so far, and that's why the impression is that time goes by faster and faster.

  16. athena2011 profile image55
    athena2011posted 6 years ago

    It's definitely true for me. seems that the older I get, the faster time flies. I like how Attikos explained it here, makes sense to me.

  17. whonunuwho profile image80
    whonunuwhoposted 6 years ago

    It is true to a certain extent that time seems to fly by each day. It seemed to creep along when I was a kid. As I became a teenager, time began to speed up for me. Then, as an adult, my time  moved along at a good clip. Now that I am a senior, Time speeds by daily much too fast to suit me and I long for old days and when it seemed that what was going on that I accepted as routine, meant much more to me than I had realized, and now I want to put on the brakes. I believe that time moves according to what our minds need to accept and moves accordingly to our development from childhood to adulthood.

 
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