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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (34 posts)

Is getting a photo id really so hard to do?

  1. KK Trainor profile image60
    KK Trainorposted 5 years ago

    Is getting a photo id really so hard to do?

    The Supreme Court has ruled that obtaining photo id is not an impediment to voting in this country, so why do liberals always claim that it suppresses the right to vote? Is it really so hard for people to go get an id so that they can buy alcohol, drive and just go about their daily lives? It's actually against the law not to carry id anyway, so if stopped by police you can be charged. Why not just get one?

  2. The Frog Prince profile image78
    The Frog Princeposted 5 years ago

    Obtaining a "valid" photo ID is the key to the question I believe.  The states that have been enacting voter ID laws, in most cases, are willing to supply the ID free of charge.  You have to prove who you are for even some of the most mundane tasks of life but not to vote?

    1. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Supplying the ID free of charge is one thing - the supporting documents are not necessarily free. I don't necessarily disagree with the ID requirements but they can be costly even if the ID is free.

  3. chuckd7138 profile image80
    chuckd7138posted 5 years ago

    It is definitely against the law to drive without having your driver's license on your person. However, one isn't required to carry identification at all times.
    You do have a point though. It is not that difficult to obtain an ID, especially a "garden-variety" photo ID ... meaning not a driver's license. All it takes is a birth certificate, some form of other verification of residence and a nominal fee, usually around $10. In most states, you can register to vote at the same time, and you receive your voter's registration card in the mail about a week or two later. It is extremely easy.

    1. ptosis profile image81
      ptosisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Wrong! SS does NOT accept a certified BC post 911 (unless you are a foreigner. You need a photo ID to get a photo ID. http://voices.yahoo.com/how-replace-pho … 06441.html

    2. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      What is SS? Social Security? We're talking about getting a simple id from a DPS/DMV office. I got one after 911 and had to provide a BC and Social Security card or passport. Everyone should have either a photo id or passport from somewhere.

    3. chuckd7138 profile image80
      chuckd7138posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      ptosis, maybe you should read my comment again. I never said anything about getting a SS card. Also, in the state of FL, to get a photo ID w/o having a photo ID, one needs a valid BC, 2nd form of residence verification & $10. I'm not wrong.

    4. ptosis profile image81
      ptosisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, That's great for a person who has a house, bills, a mailing address. I guess you'll never figured out that homeless people are stuck there not just for drugs or drink but from the system. (damn - I couldn't believe myself at first)

    5. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Chuck, it's the same in Texas, and many other states. I don't know how someone wouldn't have some type of BC or passport, unless homeless maybe. They probably would have a hard time, but I'm sure there is a way. It may be a pain, but not impossible.

    6. chuckd7138 profile image80
      chuckd7138posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In January 2004, I was homeless for only two days, a very long and extremely cold two days. Fortunately, I still had all of my IDs and required documents. Therefore, I understand that for some maintaining these things are difficult.

    7. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have had to get copies of various docs over the years in order to do things; getting BC was a pain but necessary for DL. Each state seems to do it differently. But a citizen of this country should always be able to prove who they are somehow.

    8. ptosis profile image81
      ptosisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm just(still) angry that SS will accept a BC from a person outside the USA, but will not accept a certified BC if born in the United States.  if already have a SSN - that seems unfair to citizens who should have more rights than a non-citizen.

  4. ptosis profile image81
    ptosisposted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/6869860_f260.jpg

    Has anybody lost everything and try to regain their life back post -911 and found out that you are a non-person with less rights than a foreigner who walked across the border without documentation?

    Did you know that if you do NOT have photo ID and were ticketed for jay-walking that you can be arrested because "fingerprints don't lie". You can't enter a shelter for the homeless without a photo ID.

    Why is it my friend, who was ex-military in the USN couldn't get  a photo ID even with the help of a JAG friend? I was so pissed off about the whole thing that this is one of my very first writings because I just couldn't believe what was happening to my friend and I was sure that it was happening to a lot of other people also.

    http://voices.yahoo.com/how-replace-pho … 06441.html

    "This piece of information is not documented anywhere on SSA's website, information pamphlets or posters." How to get a photo ID without a photo ID!


    Think about all those folks in natural disasters where entire towns are gone. Now you know why they are digging in the wreckage, it's not photographs  but for any ID to get help. BTW - need a photo ID to register to vote, that registration card can get you a photo ID.

    I don't understand why I can't use my fingerprints to get a photo ID when the states are taking your fingerprints when getting a photo ID.

    How do I apply for disaster relief? Hah! you need Photo ID. So now is the time to have spare ID (copies won't do) and send to relatives in a different state? (can you trust them?)

    1. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Ok, but that wasn't my question. I didn't ask it so you could talk about your article. We are talking about state id, not social security cards.

    2. chuckd7138 profile image80
      chuckd7138posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      My wallet was stolen 3 yrs ago. As soon as I realized it, which was within an hour, I was able to cancel my debit card, and therefore, able to provide relief there. However, I replaced my DL & SS card within a day. Wasn't easy, but wasn't impossi

    3. ptosis profile image81
      ptosisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Why so hostile? There are 2 ways to get a PhotoID without a PhotoID: Get arrested or go to the ER. That'll serve as your ID for 21 days to get a photo ID. I answered your question - is it hard? ' YES!!!!

  5. profile image0
    DMartelonlineposted 5 years ago

    For the record: I'm not a Liberal.  It is NOT against the law to carry an identification card.  Let's take me for example: I gave up my driver's license in 1991 since I was legally blind. At the time I was also divorced and had changed my name back to my maiden name.Now one would think that my driver's license would be enough to secure my new identification card right? Not so fast because I didn't go for the ID for a full year after I gave it up.

    I was then required to provide:

    Certified birth certificate (cost $10)
    Certified divorce decree (prove my name changed) (cost $20)
    Document proving residency (a utility bill would have sufficed but my utilities were included in my rent so I had to pay for a copy of my lease (cost $1)
    My social security card (which I of course had to wait for since it had my married name on it) (Cost $0)
    Time invested (MORE HOURS THAN I WANT TO THINK ABOUT)
    Plus $25 payable to the MA DMV

    I am over 50 so I definitely do not need ID to get booze
    I am over 50 so I can buy smokes without an ID
    All of my banking is handled through PayPal so I have no checks to deal with - ever

    Nothing you present may be over 60 days old either.  I'm pretty lucky in reality since I do have a valid passport which prevents a lot of these issues. I have no MA ID otherwise.

    1. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Is that too much trouble to go to in order to be allowed to vote?

    2. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This may not seem like "too much trouble" but after voting for more than 30 years I'd be pretty unhappy to find out 3 months before voting day that this had to be done. I don't drive and these things DO take time. Also, free isn't "free" is it?

    3. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Well lots of things aren't free, but voting is not a right it's a privilege so if it matters then someone can make the small effort to get an id. Most states have free ones for those in need anyway. If yours doesn't maybe you could change that.

    4. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are misinformed: Voting is a right not a privilege. It has been a right since the Voting Rights Act in 1965 http://library.clerk.house.gov/referenc … t_1965.pdf
      You also missed my point about voting for >30 years....

    5. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Excuse me but I'm from the South where the Voting Rights Act actually applies. It is not a right, it is a privilege protected from discrimination because of past wrongs in our states. The right is to be able to get to the polls, not to actually vote.

    6. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I think you don't understand that while this amendment granted certain voting rights, voting was ALWAYS a right (with certain requirements) http://www.lwvabc.org/pubs/history_of_vote.html

    7. chuckd7138 profile image80
      chuckd7138posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Despite your VRA link, it's definitely a privilege. Rights can't be revoked, but privileges can. Convicted felons lose their privileges to vote. I've a relative that way. She needs reinstatement from the state to vote. I don't like it, but it's fact.

    8. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      False - Civil rights (which voting is) may be revoked at any time. Just look at some of the "rights" which were suspended or changed after 9/11.

      http://www.justice.gov/usao/eousa/foia_ … m02452.htm

    9. chuckd7138 profile image80
      chuckd7138posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you. I've been thoroughly educated.

      Maybe I was thinking "unalienable rights", which are rights that cannot be taken away. Or will you find a way to dispute that as well?

    10. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I wasn't trying to be argumentative, and I never said that voting was an unalienable right.  By their nature, unalienable rights are not subject to laws by their very nature.

    11. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Here is another link, this one demonstrates both sides of the argument. If you're interested.

      http://felonvoting.procon.org/view.answ … nID=000646

    12. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Fascinating! If someone is going to cast a fraudulent vote, chances are they are *not* going to show up at the polls, but they will cast an absentee ballot.  I don't know how good an ID is when they can be so easily recreated. How much fraud is there

    13. Reality Bytes profile image82
      Reality Bytesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Rights can be taken away from an individual upon Due Process!

  6. Reality Bytes profile image82
    Reality Bytesposted 5 years ago

    There is absolutely no law in the United States requiring a citizen to have an Identification card on their person.  You have to orally reveal your name to a Police Officer upon request, that is the only requirement under law. 

    Hiibel v. Sixth Judicial District Court of Nevada

    Even speaking your name to a Police Officer is not necessary under certain circumstances.

    "Fifth Amendment privilege might apply in a situation where there was a reasonable belief that giving a name could be incriminating"

    1. KK Trainor profile image60
      KK Trainorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Sorry but you are absolutely wrong. Many states require photo id to be shown when requested by police, including the one I live in. If you refuse to show id you can be taken to jail for faliure to provide id.

    2. profile image0
      DMartelonlineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Statutes in Texas: http://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal … /case.html
      ..to detain .. require him to identify himself violated the Fourth .. the officers lacked any reasonable suspicion to believe appellant was .. engaged in criminal conduct.

    3. Reality Bytes profile image82
      Reality Bytesposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Show me the law.  No ID, no criminal charges, no fines, nothing!

 
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