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Why are people charitable to those abroad when there are so many issues here at

  1. Express10 profile image89
    Express10posted 3 years ago

    Why are people charitable to those abroad when there are so many issues here at home?

  2. TheRSTeacher profile image80
    TheRSTeacherposted 3 years ago

    Hmm this is an interesting question. Is here at home the US? I am in the UK but the question is still relevant here. I think often people see issues abroad, like in the third world as being worse or more pressing and then there is the issue of publicity. A lot of international issues get big appeals which raises awareness.
    I also think that if we are all humans why should we only give to those from our own country? But I agree more national issues often get over looked.

    I think issues closer to home afford people to be charitable through actions and not just monetary donations but people have to be aware of iniatives and so on first.

    1. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for answering, I was referring to the US but you have a valid point that is relevant to each country. I think people should be charitable abroad but preferably after serious issues have been addressed at home to strengthen from within.

  3. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    Here in the U.S. I believe it's because many people feel that by simply being born here you have an advantage along with lots of opportunity to have a decent life. Assuming one makes (smart) decisions along the way.
    When they see someone else who is born in a country without running water, electricity, or little access to food and medicines it's only natural to empathize with them more. Being born poor in America as imperfect as it is would be the equivalent to living like royalty compared to some other places around the globe.

    1. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with your points however, there are people in the US without running water, electricity, food, homes, medical attention, etc. They are simply overlooked whether they are in Appalachia or in urban or rural areas.

    2. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. However their problem is they lack the knowledge of government programs and resources that are available to them. Section 8, Welfare, and various governmental and non-for-profit organizations exist for them. Not the case in the 3rd world.

    3. peeples profile image95
      peeplesposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Dashing curious if you are aware that those programs are almost impossible to qualify for if you are trying at all to help yourself. We were homeless and working and couldn't get welfare or section 8.

    4. dashingscorpio profile image87
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      peeples, I'm unaware what is required to qualify for these programs. However these and other options are not available at all in 3rd world countries. I believe charity does begin at home. My point was to illustrate why some folks donate outside.

    5. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Amen Peeples! I learned what people go through while working at a charity that helps the homeless and hungry. I have seen the working poor and the working HOMELESS who work at least 1 or 2 jobs daily. We'd do well to help them and our veterans 1st.

  4. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 3 years ago

    I think it is sad that even saying your question in many circles is considered wrong. I think it is pathetic that we have millions of homeless, millions of hungry, 500,000 foster kids carrying their little belonging from home to home in trash bags, yet we put out 23 Billion in foreign aid and an additional 14 Billion in Foreign Military Assistance. The USA has approximately 3.5 Million homeless. We also have approximately 18.5 Million abandoned homes. Our government blindly looks over these facts while they continue to hand out money to help other countries.
    With all that said, I have no problem with our government helping other countries, but before you can act like top dog, it might actually help if we ARE top dog. Just like families, we should take care of our own first and then spread our good deeds around.

    1. TheRSTeacher profile image80
      TheRSTeacherposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree- people I think genuinely don't realize how bad the situation is in their own country. I think people would be shocked to know that their is real poverty in countries like the US and the UK.

    2. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Your points are spot on!

    3. gmwilliams profile image86
      gmwilliamsposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      AMEN, charity DOES/SHOULD begin at home!

  5. Efficient Admin profile image91
    Efficient Adminposted 3 years ago

    I am all for helping those people in other countries who live in mud shacks and don't have running water or clean water to drink. However right here in the USA there are plenty of people barely surviving, and many American people are living in horrid conditions, some without running water or heat / air.  Then there are the "tent cities" sprouting up across the country.

    I volunteer at the Salvation Army and this particular location caters to those who are working full-time (they also help unemployed people) but can hardly make ends meet because their wages do not keep up with the cost of living. There are many homeless people in my city living under bridges because they don't feel safe going to a homeless shelter.  I cringe when I see people overseas and the USA living in squalor but I think it is my duty to donate to my own backyard first before overseas, because the problem is here as well.

    1. Express10 profile image89
      Express10posted 3 years agoin reply to this

      There are so many who ignore or are unaware that there are Americans in the US living as if they were in a 3rd world country with no home, food or medical care. A frightening number are children as well as WORKING adults and veterans.

 
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