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Should convicts and ex convicts have the right to vote?

  1. PeterStip profile image71
    PeterStipposted 2 years ago

    Should convicts and ex convicts have the right to vote?

    now with the elections coming up the question rises: if you are a convict do you have a right to vote? Is the president not there to represent the whole nation, all it citizens, or only those with a clean sheet?
    Shouldn't convicts not also have the right to vote? Even those who have a death sentence?

  2. RTalloni profile image89
    RTalloniposted 2 years ago

    I'm not sure why the policy was established but it seems that with the rate of recidivism we see the policy can be quite useful. Withholding the right to vote is an obvious reminder to everyone that becoming a convict has a lasting impact on one's own life, not just their on victims' lives.

    1. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Not all crimes have victims. Drug possession for instance. Do you think that people who are addicted to drugs should not have the right to vote?

    2. RTalloni profile image89
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      There are no victimless crimes.  Everyone pays when criminals are arrested.  The right to vote is given or withheld by law and I would support a law that prevents drug addicts from voting, but I do not think we have such a law.

  3. bradmasterOCcal profile image31
    bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years ago

    What benefit would that provide for the people, and the country?
    Besides, we already have a situation where we don't know who is voting in our elections now.

    It is entirely possible that convicts are voting by mail, along with dead people and illegal aliens.

    1. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Is the United States not the land where freedom of speech is one of the best things?  Why should inmates not have the freedom to speak out their opinion about politics? What if you are only in jail for smoking a joint on the wrong place, wrong time?

    2. RTalloni profile image89
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Criminals have many ways to become politically active.  Just like other people, they can choose to educate themselves by studying all sides of issues, work in campaigns, and more.  That they cannot vote does not keep them from speaking out.

    3. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I thought the word politician ment "to be a legal criminal"

    4. RTalloni profile image89
      RTalloniposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      heeheeheeā€¦ that is thought provoking, albeit not completely true.  They system sure does have an effect on the honest ones who enter it, though, doesn't it?

    5. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I guess a lot of people enter politics with ideals, but bit by bit they alter their original ideas. Power.has the tendency to corrupt people. Not everyone but a lot, in every country. Some do it in the open, some behind closed doors

  4. ParadigmEnacted profile image73
    ParadigmEnactedposted 2 years ago

    Being an ex con means being released, theoretically rehabilitated, ready to re-enter society with a full bill of rights, so yes absolutely...if they want. Why wouldn't they get to? It concerns these people greatly who gets elected.

    1. Aime F profile image84
      Aime Fposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yep, agree with this. The idea is to have them reintegrated into society and rehabilitated, so I think the right to vote goes along with that. Can't expect them to feel a part of society if they're having basic rights withheld.

    2. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly, it's bizarre that you're not allowed to vote if you are in prison for let's say caring to much dope. But as we all know, what is the great majority in the prisons, Afro Americans, and they are still treated like 2nd hand citizens.

  5. profile image60
    C.J. Wrightposted 2 years ago

    Absolutely should have the right to vote.  I find the stripping of this right to be most egregious.  The very founding of the country was about taxation without representation.  How can one be represented if they do not have the right to vote?  Rights should NEVER be taken away forever.  Those incarcerated could loose rights for the time they are being held. Once that time is up.  The rights must be restored. To fail in this is to create a permanent criminal class.  It should also be noted that prison is NOT about rehab. Its about punishment.  If rights are lost permanently then the sentence is never truly completed. I'm pretty sure the founders wrote something down about "cruel and/or unusual" punishments.  I don't recall them discussing rehab.

    1. PeterStip profile image71
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      True rehab and imprisonment are two different things. Striping of their votes is a strange thing, are they also striped from there drivers licence? It surely is a political move to give convicts no power to vote.

  6. lisavollrath profile image96
    lisavollrathposted 2 years ago

    I believe that while people are incarcerated, they should not be allowed to vote. Once they are released, and have served their sentence, their debt to society is paid, and they should have all the rights and privileges of any other citizen, including the right to vote.

 
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