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What will Germany look like in ten years time?

  1. MarieLB profile image83
    MarieLBposted 2 years ago

    What will Germany look like in ten years time?

    We are seeing unprecedented changes happening in our time.  These large numbers of peoples that are leaving their homeland and settling in other countries are likely to make a difference to the countries that welcome them.
    EG: Germany is taking large numbers of Syrians.  In 10 years' time, will they be influencing their neighborhoods or will they be influenced by the country they are in?  Will some be running take-aways and popularizing their foods and will their children now reaching their teens want to dress like their German friends?
    Will they put a stamp on the areas they now live in?

  2. lions44 profile image100
    lions44posted 2 years ago

    I have several answers and they could all apply:
    1. Yes, Germany will be changed but you hope the freedom that the refugees find in Europe will change them. It will be the first time any of these people will experience true freedom, particularly the women.  Let's hope the new culture overwhelms old religious and cultural regression.  Assimilation is the goal but can take a long time.
    2. Germany still owes the world, especially the Western world, a debt.  The entire 20th Century was shaped by the two world wars that they initiated.  We lived with the consequences until the 1990s.  In some ways, some of the issues are still with us. 
    3.  Now that Europe is "united,"  they have to make some tough choices.  Birthrates among European natives (regardless of race or ethnicity) is still very low with the exception of the middle eastern/Islamic population.  That is a cultural paradigm that will not change soon.

    1. MarieLB profile image83
      MarieLBposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks for reading and responding CJKelly.  Interesting assumptions, well worth reflecting on.  When you say Germany "owes" us, wouldn't that apply to all the allies, and also to those who devastated Japan?

    2. lions44 profile image100
      lions44posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, I do mean all the Western Allied countries that helped bring down Germany and to a lesser extent, Japan.  Our magnanimous occupation of the country is why they are a dominant player in Europe today.

  3. Terrex profile image81
    Terrexposted 2 years ago

    Based on what has happened in the rest of Europe and the world, I am afraid the homelands of people today do not face a very rosy future.
    The 'shariaa patrols' in the UK and France are a reality today based on the short-sighted immigration policies of years and decades past.

    1. MarieLB profile image83
      MarieLBposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Terrex, thank you for reading and for giving us your view.  It is quite interesting to read the variety of opinions.  You seem to have a rather fearful result in mind.  You may be right, but for humanity's sake, let us hope you are not.

    2. Terrex profile image81
      Terrexposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      One cannot help but be fearful in the face of facts like the astronomical incidence of rape in Sweden and the organised pedophilic grooming gangs in UK.
      Humanity still doesn't like to talk openly about them so I do fear for the future of our children

    3. MarieLB profile image83
      MarieLBposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Terrex,  The facts you present do seem dark, and I agree that it is imperative that we talk about them openly.  I think that it will be a complex and difficult task to combat such evil forces.  Any ideas what might get us there?

    4. Terrex profile image81
      Terrexposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Steps 1,2&3: Stop political correctness. If a particular race/religion/ethnicity etc. is10 times more likely to commit a particular type of crime, SAY SO.
      It's been revealed UK police let little girls be abused for years because of this cowardice

  4. MarieLB profile image83
    MarieLBposted 2 years ago

    Terrex  Re: Steps 1,2&3: Stop political correctness.
    I fully agree with you there.  Political correctness was fine for a while, but it has become a two-edged sword.  Increasingly it is being used not to show respect to others, but to fulfill one's own agenda.

    Terrex, I have a theory.  It seems to me that when we [society] want to right a wrong we tend to create a new form of behaviour.  Sometimes this new norm is adopted by so many that it becomes problematic in itself.

    This then creates its own wave of discontent and someone, somewhere will come up with yet a new norm to abolish the "Old" new norm, as the swing returns to where it came from.

    I hope you can figure out what I am trying to say Terrex.

    1. Terrex profile image81
      Terrexposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      @Marie:
      Actually, no. Why don't you just say exactly what you're thinking so we can skip the 'figure out' part?
      I hope you aren't being politically correct... smile

  5. profile image0
    Commonsensethinkposted 2 years ago

    I think that part of the thinking is that the war in Syria will eventually will come to an end, and a lot of these refugees will go home.

    That is essentially what the difference is between a "refugee" and a "migrant".

    There are already quite a few of the new arrivals who are not happy with what they have found and already want to leave (though given the state of Syria as I write, there is nowhere for them to go safely back to). There is also some talk that if the individuals do not assimilate that eventually some of them may be sent to Turkey (with financial assistance from the German government).

    There is also a steady growth of resistance to the new arrivals among at least half of the German population, even if all the mainstream political parties were originally in favour. The once peripheral ultraconservative political party, the AfD, has risen to 12% in the opinion polls - and that is not a good sign.

    There is also the question why so many (seemingly criminal) elements have entered as "refugees" from countries like Morocco and Algeria where there is no war going on. That became a  significant issue in the New Year's Eve events in Cologne, where most of the perpetrators where actually Algerians and Moroccans, not Syrians (or Iraqis).

    In 10 years time - I don't expect all that many to have stayed, and the ones who will be here will be the ones who can assimilate to a tolerant, secular society.

    I fear though that, before that, this could lead to substantial upheavals if the influx doesn't stop, and all the other EU countries (apart from Italy, Greece, Austria and Sweden, and maybe the Netherlands, who have contributed very positively to the crisis) don't do more.

    1. profile image0
      Commonsensethinkposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      "where most of the perpetrators where actually Algerians and Moroccans" should read "where most of the perpetrators were actually Algerians and Moroccans" - sorry for the typo.

    2. MarieLB profile image83
      MarieLBposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You gave us a balanced & researched report. It is so useful to listen to a sane voice. Thank you. I hope we find a path between letting everybody in regardless,and putting all refugees in cruel, indefinite detention as happening in my country.

 
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