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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (12 posts)

Would you give up 5% of your pay to prevent your coworkers from being laid off?

  1. crackerjack9 profile image79
    crackerjack9posted 2 years ago

    Would you give up 5% of your pay to prevent your coworkers from being laid off?

    How would you react if your company cut your pay by 5% to prevent layoffs? If you think of all you have compared to a person who has nothing, do you feel like you can sacrifice some small pleasures in order to help out a fellow human being?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12716652_f260.jpg

  2. LoisRyan13903 profile image82
    LoisRyan13903posted 2 years ago

    I wouldn't give up my pay but I would ask to take a voluntary layoff to help the ones with less seniority keep their jobs

    1. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      C'mon now, that action is being unreasonable.  You need your job.  What good is it that you ask to be laid off and you are unemployed.  Please, inductive and deductive logic here.

    2. LoisRyan13903 profile image82
      LoisRyan13903posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Usually Voluntary Layoff has a return date well in my co.  Been there done that take advantage whenever that comes around.  Had a 12 week one Mar-Jun, went tanning and some hockey games, daughters graduations.  HAD FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3. gmwilliams profile image84
      gmwilliamsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      OK, TAKE BACK STATEMENT! APOLOGIZE PROFUSELY!

    4. LoisRyan13903 profile image82
      LoisRyan13903posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Lol!  Forgiven.  But my response may have been confusing.  When I do that I have to keep an eye on the amnt os Social Security when I retire.  Plan to retire at 62 and don't want it to fall under 4k A month

  3. dashingscorpio profile image86
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/12717199_f260.jpg

    I could only see going along with that if it was a "mom & pop" size company of less than 100 employees and I really loved working there. Otherwise I would take it that the company is in trouble and I should start looking elsewhere.
    I'd be more likely to accept the 5% pay cut if it corresponded with working 5% percent less. Maybe have my choice of one to two furlough days off per month with no pay. Reducing work hours can be a great alternative to layoffs. It also avoids having too many people on slow days just standing around.
    Hourly $ remains the same but have fewer hours.
    Eighteen states in the United States, including California, Florida, and Massachusetts, offer benefits to furloughed employees, and employers have to work out the details in a written agreement with the state beforehand. However I suspect many people would be open to having 4 day work weeks as well.
    Naturally when business picks up an employer is much more likely to have all hands on deck working a full week than they are likely to give everyone their 5% pay back instantly.

    1. crackerjack9 profile image79
      crackerjack9posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, in a little store you are more likely to be closer to your coworkers and maybe even be friends outside of work. That would make a difference.

  4. gmwilliams profile image84
    gmwilliamsposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7698509_f260.jpg

    NOPE.  The reasoning is that people have worked long and hard to get where they are in their present career and pay level.  It is beyond ludicrous for employees to take a 5% paycut to stall layoffs of other employees.   Layoffs are a fact of life in today's work world, especially in the private sector.  If the person is a good employee, sooner or later(most likely, sooner), h/she will be reinstated to his/her former job; if not, h/she will find work elsewhere.  If h/she is a less than stellar employee, well.......that layoff goes w/the territory.  This employee will learn his/her lessons and move on. The work world is indeed a jungle and each employee has to be his/her BEST and watch out for #1.

    1. crackerjack9 profile image79
      crackerjack9posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      It doesn't have to be the way. I don't make a lot of money and even I could do without 5% of my pay. I guess it would depend on how good the company has been to me and how close I was to my coworkers, though.

  5. profile image59
    peter565posted 2 years ago

    If I am making a decent living and have no such need of money, then yes.  During the Global Financial Crisis, in my dad's company, before considering firing people, the senior executive are the first to receive temporary pay cut.,  As a result, not a lot of people got laid off, there

    1. crackerjack9 profile image79
      crackerjack9posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      That's awesome!

 
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