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How do democrats feel about the super delegates choosing Clinton over Sanders ?

  1. ahorseback profile image78
    ahorsebackposted 2 years ago

    How do democrats feel about the super delegates choosing Clinton over Sanders  ?

    In such a tight race it seems such a hypocritical way of choosing a leader , to have the super delegates  deciding for you because , Why ?  Because  Your vote counts so much  ?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12889770_f260.jpg

  2. Old-Empresario profile image82
    Old-Empresarioposted 2 years ago

    It's disappointing; but I think everyone expected it.

    1. ahorseback profile image78
      ahorsebackposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I never understood the difference between the two parties though , Talk about unfair .

  3. lisavollrath profile image95
    lisavollrathposted 2 years ago

    I think the whole super delegate concept is bad. One vote, one person is diluted enough when applied to choosing delegates. The idea that some delegates have no votes behind them, and simply choose a candidate---and that their votes are worth more than regular delegates---is appalling.

    1. ahorseback profile image78
      ahorsebackposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree completely with that !  Appalling

  4. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 2 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12890708_f260.jpg

    This isn't new. The Democrats created "Super Delegates" in 1984.
    Party leaders felt that prior to having them their old system took power away from them. It started out as having 14% "super delegates" and today it's up to 20%.
    Nevertheless this has been in place for 32 years.
    In fact it was one of the ways that Obama defeated Hillary in 2008. He focused early on as getting the "super delegates" committed.
    Clinton won Nevada that year but Obama got more delegates because of the "super delegates". Essentially he had a better strategy.
    If one's candidate has racked up "super delegates" they're happy with the rules but if their candidate is losing the delegate count they're unhappy with the rules. Bernie Sanders and his team are aware of DNC rules and policies. They didn't create the rule for Hillary Clinton.
    In many ways it's similar to the "electoral college" in the general election where one candidate can {win the popular vote} but lose the election because they did not get 272 electoral college votes.
    This happened to Al Gore in 2000 when he lost to George W. Bush.
    Ultimately the number of "super delegates" is still far short of winning enough delegates. In order to win the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, a candidate must win 2,382 delegates at the national convention.
    There are a total of 712 "super delegates" available in 2016.

 
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