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Does the glorification of violence in Hollywood encourage the daily mass shooti

  1. profile image0
    PeterStipposted 2 years ago

    Does the glorification of violence in Hollywood encourage  the daily mass shootings in the US.

    Hollywood loves violence because it sells. Assassinations, war, gang fights, Westerns. There are thousands of movies made by Hollywood where violence is the main theme. Thousands of people are shot dead in movies, without consequences. The law does not exist in movies.
    Do you think this violence has an impact on the society as a whole?
    You are not allowed to buy porn under the age of 18 in the US, but it's no problem to buy a first person shooter game or watch The Terminator as a kid.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/12901486_f260.jpg

  2. ChristinS profile image96
    ChristinSposted 2 years ago

    I think that psychologically speaking it must have some effect.  Obviously, our violence epidemic is a multi-tiered problem, but the glorification of violence and constant exposure to it certainly must have some impact, particularly desensitization to the actual effects of violence.

    Our country promotes violence as a form of power.  Take a disenfranchised person who feels they are marginalized and not heard and they become powerless.  Our society teaches them that guns give them power over others - so it's kind of a natural conclusion.

    Obviously, in the end, the fault lies with the shooter - but I think it's a mistake we make as a society to not try to figure out what fuels the rage that leads people to snap.

    1. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      True, instead of pointing fingers we should have a look what causes the violence and aggression in a society and how to reduce it.

  3. tamarawilhite profile image91
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    The daily shootings in the US are predominantly black on black crime. The problem is the breakdown of the black family and much greater gang participation for their youth, as they fight over opportunities to sell drugs.
    The solution then isn't banning movies or games, but rebuilding the black family and bringing order to the ghettoes.

    1. ChristinS profile image96
      ChristinSposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      the majority of mass shootings are not black people  - smh...

    2. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I have to correct you. 44% of the mass shootings are white, 11% is black, the rest other ethnicities. Google mass shootings ethnicity and you will see that you've got a prejudice on this subject. wrong information in the media...

    3. tamarawilhite profile image91
      tamarawilhiteposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      If 70% of the population is white and less than half of mass shootings are by the same group, ethnic minorities are committing these acts disproportionately - as is true for the murder rate.

    4. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Whites make up about 63% of the U.S. population, blacks 13%
      44% of the mass shooters is white, 11% black. This shows a complete different picture then you are describing.

  4. Aime F profile image84
    Aime Fposted 2 years ago

    I don't think it specifically encourages mass shootings, no.  There are plenty of developed nations that eat up violent movies just the same as the US but have a notable lack of mass shootings and nowhere near the epidemic taking place in the US.


    I'm in Canada and when it comes to entertainment we are virtually indistinguishable from the US when it comes to what we watch on tv, what movies we see, popular music, etc.

    Where we DO differ greatly, of course, is our access to health care (notably mental health care), gun laws, and gun culture in general. 

    I also think that the real life recognition given to shooters is a much larger problem than movies.

    1. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I don't think it's the prime cause. Def not. but it doesn't help. tele, movies,games are so full of violence it detaches itself from the real world. In a movie you never see a funeral. Bad guys have family too! Take Darth Vader for instance ;-)

  5. fpherj48 profile image78
    fpherj48posted 2 years ago

    Peter... I realize there's not much argument "Hollywood loves violence because it sells." ( Pretty shameful what that says about us as a people/nation.)

    It comes down to some common sense and an acceptance of society's realities.  I don't see how we could "deny" the impact this violence portrayed on the screen/TV/Books, can and does have in a certain degree of influence.

    Our primary concern in terms of this influence of course should be the exposure and unsupervised access when it comes to young kids.  It's not ideal viewing at any age IMHO, but children are far too immature and impressionable to consume the violence that is so prevalent and rampant now (and in recent past).

    In the home, the parent must be vigilant and create rules about the amount of time their children spend on video games and most importantly the "types" of games they are playing.  This is the LEAST parents can & should do.  Because exposure to violence extends beyond our homes, it's imperative to keep lines of communication/discussion with kids, open at all times.  Schools should also be actively involved.

    1. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Agree, it's the exposure. Human Beings are sadly enough cruel beings, but we have the brains to correct ourselves.
      Pers. I found lot's of Walt Disney far to violent for kids. It is the role from the parent, but the media also has a responsibility.

  6. bradmasterOCcal profile image43
    bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years ago

    I believe that any link to real life shootings is based on the insecurity of the person. A confident person wouldn't mistake Hollywood for reality. Otherwise there would be a lot of dead people trying to emulate Superman flying.

    I really enjoy First Person Shooter games, and I have no tendency to shoot at real people. In fact, shooting at graphical enemies is a good way to release the tensions of the day, as long as you think of it as a Game.

    1. profile image0
      PeterStipposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      In a way you're right. People do need a way to release there stress and tension. Going for a walk with the dog helps as well.
      I think though that everything you see and hear in your life has an influence. More so if you're a kid. Images have impact.

    2. bradmasterOCcal profile image43
      bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Peter
      Most kids are or at least were smart enough to know the difference between unreal and reality. Take the simple cartoon, how many kids think they can jump off a cliff, or hit someone on the head with an anvil?
      Sure there a few, as always.

 
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