How do you feel about Food Stamps being used for plants/seeds?

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  1. Annsalo profile image84
    Annsaloposted 2 years ago

    How do you feel about Food Stamps being used for plants/seeds?

    I recently found out that EBT can be used to buy plants and seeds that will produce food. I think it is wonderful because it encourages people to plant and grow their own food. I was wondering what others thought of this.

  2. tamarawilhite profile image91
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    I see no problem with it. It may allow them to eat more cheaply than buying vegetables in the store, and it gives them a productive use for their time in any case.

    1. bradmasterOCcal profile image30
      bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, it all depends on their motivation. It certainly is better than using it on Alcohol, or Tobacco.

    2. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. A cucumber in the store costs around $1 for 1, where a plant costs $3 and makes many.

    3. WordCrafter09 profile image76
      WordCrafter09posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Respectfully, who, exactly, do you think is eligible for Food Stamps, why do you assume they don't have all kinds of work and worries and have the time and energy and weather and health to be bothered dealing with a vegetable garden?

    4. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      ME, please feel free to answer so you can have more space to express your opinion on the topic. I'm curious what your opinion actually is.

  3. ronbergeron profile image84
    ronbergeronposted 2 years ago

    I think it's a good idea. It's a more efficient use of the money in nutrition per dollar and encourages self-sufficiency and longer-term planning.

    1. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree!

    2. WordCrafter09 profile image76
      WordCrafter09posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Apparently, you are unfamiliar with planning and "wangling" skills needed and used by responsible adults/family people who are eligible for the program in the first place.

    3. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Since I am unsure who you were addressing could you elaborate?

  4. fpherj48 profile image77
    fpherj48posted 2 years ago

    Fabulous of course!  That's what I call "resourceful."  Just to think of producing rows of fresh produce for minimal cost is great.  I wonder what took so long for some wise person to realize this & allow seeds to be purchased?
    As Brad said, it is a far cry more acceptable than people "selling" their food allotments for cash to then buy the "less finer things in life!"

    1. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Yes! And how awesome they can grow crops year round, seed save, and have even more the following year. No idea how long it has been allowed, but I don't think was an option 8 yrs ago when we had them.

    2. WordCrafter09 profile image76
      WordCrafter09posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      The person who relies on some of the less finer things of life to keep going (NOT to escape from the "put-through-the-ringer" lifestyle) would do better with more cash/less free cheese.

  5. WordCrafter09 profile image76
    WordCrafter09posted 2 years ago

    There's nothing wrong with it, but I'm looking at the answers here and wondering if some people are even serious with their answer. As far as I can guess, the people most likely to want to buy seeds might be elderly people on a fixed income (assuming they're healthy enough, have the space, and climate) to do more than grow a few tomatoes).

    Don't some recipients have low-paying jobs and/or children that they're either caring for themselves or else worried about because they're in the care of someone else?  How much luxury, leisure time, and need for additional time-killing/work think some people have?  Why is there the assumption that people (for example, divorced people with "income issues") are essentially stupid and incapable of managing money?  I know one unemployed professional who worked part-time at a store with a couple of other professionals who had either been laid off or else had health issues that meant cut back on stress and work.

    Some people don't have a car and must shop once a month with someone who does (which is one reason they may stock up on some snacks they let occasionally let their kids have each week).  And, while I am not receiving food stamps, I can tell you that in a challenging enough situation (especially for a person with worries, stress, kids, a health thing, Winter weather that means being trapped in a house; I can tell you that extreme, long-term, stress means starting to crave more sugar, fats, and salt just in order to keep going (if one is not to just go lay on a couch and let responsibilities and family "rot").  Further, under some types of stress a person's digestive system can be thrown off, which means something as "harsh" as some vegetables will make them feel sick.  (Look up any of these points in some "legitimate" reference site.)  Also, look up how children feel deprived and "have-not" when they can't have a simple birthday party, Halloween candy, or, worse, if they're stressed be expected to function in school without the fats or even sugar that would help.

    Personally, I've had times when I worked on this computer 19/20 hours a day and live the rest of my life essentially not being able to relax/rest.  It's not that expensive to pick up a few fresh vegetables for when I want/need them OR to keep frozen or canned (no salt added) so they won't go bad before I use them.  For the most exhausted and stressed folks, better the program let them pick up a couple of prepared meals/small salads.

    1. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You are right. Not ALL ppl getting them can use it. We recently found out we qualify barely for a few $ a month, and we garden. Not all ppl can, but some can and I know I would. I think it helps, it takes no effort to grow some things.

    2. WordCrafter09 profile image76
      WordCrafter09posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      People who have been put through enough ringers long enough can have trouble making a chit-chat phone call, let alone being "turned into bloody farmers".  Again, not knocking the seeds thing if it's of use to someone.

    3. Annsalo profile image84
      Annsaloposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. I am sure for some it would be too much. We've struggled all our lives, and I am awaiting disability. Even though it makes me ache gardening has always helped me feel at peace in stressful times. I think it could do that for more ppl also.

    4. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Planting a garden will not fit every food-stamp recipient's situation and abilities. Still, for those it will help, it's nice that they can pay for food producing plants with part of their food-stamp allotment.

      Using them for snacks is OK with me.

 
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