Do You Support Legalizing Marijuana for Recreational Use?

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  1. RJ Schwartz profile image90
    RJ Schwartzposted 16 months ago

    I realize that this is a touchy subject and many people might not want to respond over concerns that someone else might see their answers in a negative light.  However, the topic is going to get more debate as time progresses.  Unlike most of the debates in these forums, this topic is neither left or right.

    The latest Washington insider leaks are that the Fed is going to tackle this topic after the midterms - many believe that AG Sessions (who is firmly against any legalization) will be removed from office soon, thus clearing a hurdle for real change.  The President is also currently involved in prison reform, which also is connected to the subject.

    Many of the pro-marijuana websites publish polling data which shows a majority of Americans support legalization.  I'd like to hear your opinions on the subject and why you might be pro or against it.

    I'll go first - yes, I am in favor of it.  It should be regulated much the same way as alcohol or tobacco.

    1. promisem profile image97
      promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      No, I'm strongly opposed. The agency where I do volunteer work specializes in services for people with mental illness, substance abuse and developmental disorders.

      We have a very high number of people being treated for marijuana addiction. It has skyrocketed because THC levels also have skyrockted in recent years.

      Our society doesn't need more addicts.

      1. RJ Schwartz profile image90
        RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Can you legally share some of the symptoms of what you've described as marijuana addiction?  I'm sure many people have heard that it is impossible to become addicted to it and your experiences could help with educating more people.

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          It's similar to alcohol and other drugs:

          - Using it more often, especially daily.
          - Getting immune to the buzz and needing more for the same high.
          - Obsessing about it.
          - Spending more and more money on it.
          - Struggling to break way from it, even for brief periods of time.
          - Impact on job and social life.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            As RJ says, it is a well known and publicized "fact" that marijuana is not addictive.

            Practical experience says otherwise, and those symptoms you mention are very true.  It becomes a psychological necessity, if not a physical one, and that is addiction no matter how you label it.

            1. promisem profile image97
              promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              The myth that marijuana is not addictive came during the 60s and 70s when the drug was much milder.

              The rising levels of THC in contemporary marijuana makes it much more addictive, which is why so many more people are getting treatment for it.

      2. Castlepaloma profile image74
        Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Don't give any mentally ill patients marrijanna the same for drugs like alcohol or  most legal drugs.

        Coffee is more addictive than marrijanna. The justice system sets it up like you are drug addicts and need rehab nonsense.

        Why? Because the justice system is more about money, same for the drug Cartels, prison guards and drug companies. They are the winner in this dog fight, not the rest of us.

    2. Credence2 profile image79
      Credence2posted 16 months agoin reply to this

      I agree with you, this time. I see no reason to treat it any differently from tobacco and alcohol. Colorado, particularly, Denver went hog wild after pot was made legal for recreational use. There are pot dispensers in every neighborhood. We have moved away from the "dirty" Cheech and Chung image to gourmet flavors and scents.

      This state, Florida, is much more conservative, but there is pressure here to legalize for recreational use as the pressure to do the same is felt nationwide.

      1. RJ Schwartz profile image90
        RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        What are the main talking points in your state?  Both pro and con, if you can find them.

        1. Credence2 profile image79
          Credence2posted 16 months agoin reply to this

          I wanted to get back with you on this RJ

          https://www.thoughtco.com/pros-and-cons … na-3325521

          The issues, pros and cons of legalizing MJ for recreational use in Florida is much the same as our sister states.

          The current system of availability of marijuana for medical purposes in Florida is just a sham, makeshift "doctors" have sprung up overnight initiating the licensing process from the state for citizens to obtain MJ for virtually any reason.

          In spite of this, the case for legalization is stronger than the case for not legalizing it. I believe.

          I have no use for the stuff as I am older and need all my brain cells intact plus I have an innate dislike of being "out of control", but that is just me.

          Being the good liberal that I am, I can distinguish between what is my preference verses the rights of others to make their own choices, respecting their prerogatives as I would my own.

    3. RJ Schwartz profile image90
      RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      This literally just came in:
      Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-CA), long a champion of legalizing marijuana, told the Fox Business Network on Thursday that President Donald Trump intends to reform federal policies on marijuana after the midterm elections in November.

      Trump’s new policy is expected to approve the medical use of marijuana, while leaving the question of recreational marijuana to the states. That would fulfill a campaign promise from 2016, when Trump said he backed medical marijuana “100 percent.”

    4. Ken Burgess profile image92
      Ken Burgessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      I'm in favor of it.

      There are a lot of people with disorders, everything from bi-polar to anxiety to autism that it has been shown scientifically that use of weed can help.

      It is a natural substance, and anything natural should be able to be grown and used as any person sees fit.

      Obviously, like with Alcohol, you should not be able to drive, work, etc. while under the influence.  You should be barred from certain professions if you do use it, and it should be limited to an age.

      Weed has a lot more beneficial uses than alcohol does, and can help a lot of people who suffer with anxiety and social disorders. 

      Biggest reason why it is illegal is the same reason so many other things are illegal that are over-the-counter available in most other countries you can travel to... Big Pharma controls the politicians in Congress, and Congress writes the laws that we have to live by.

      Another benefit of making it legal is a lot of people in prison would not be there, many families and lives that are destroyed because their homes are raided by police for growing a few plants would no longer suffer, and it would give States something else to tax... rather than spending tax money fighting the 'war on weed'.

      Not to mention, it would severely damage, if not destroy, the illegal import of millions of pounds of it by Mexican gangs.

      If not for Big Pharma standing firmly opposed against it (and buying off the votes in Congress necessary to keep it illegal)  I think America would be ahead of Canada in terms of legalizing it... which Canada, and most of the rest of the 'civilized' world, has.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image74
        Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        I wish America would take the lead on making marrijanna legal. Because it's much harder dragging them into, what has been always  a healthy herb. At least reefer madness people are almost dead.

    5. Glenis Rix profile image96
      Glenis Rixposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Rather than legalising marijuana, I think society should address the more fundamental questions about why people feel the need to take mind-altering drugs.I imagine that such needs come from a place of unhappiness or dissatisfaction with the realities of day to day living. Having identified the issues, perhaps we might put in place measures to address the problems that drive people towards mental disintegration.

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image78
        Kathryn L Hillposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Of course!

        My suggestion is to change our methods of pedagogy and overhaul our educational institutions. Indians raised children without schools. Their children grew into adulthood with the skills they needed to survive. The indigenous survived on this continent for eons of time. I'm not saying abandon schools, I'm saying work with the child in a more natural way, conducive to how they naturally learn: In freedom, (within boundaries.)

        The natural child has a fascination with his world and adapts to it with joy. Our world does not allow children to adapt according to their own fascination, interest and enthusiasm for life. Instead they are forced to learn for the sake of grades and other inducements. And if they cannot find the will to obey, they are punished. In time, they loose the will to live and find ways to escape just existing.

        Mere existence is boring. The inner life wants to follow its own intrinsic motivations. We expect children up to 18 years of age to suppress their own volition and joy of life. Then, the unlucky,(obedient,) ones, go to college and get further indoctrinated and reformed into what the left wants people to be: obedient, willing slaves of socialism.
        .... and then you wonder why "they" advocate getting on meds and staying on meds for every psychological ill?

        And then the youth discover that pot is a natural high ... much better than those meds. and much better than suppressing their will and finally: some sort of easily induced numbness.
        ETC.

  2. PrettyPanther profile image83
    PrettyPantherposted 16 months ago

    I support legalization. I live in a state where it is already legal. Substance addiction, whether to marijuana, alcohol, cigarettes, or other drugs, will exist whether a substance is legal or not. There is considerable evidence that legal access to marijuana decreases use of more dangerous substances like opioids and alcohol.

    1. promisem profile image97
      promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      That goes contrary to other studies.

      "Marijuana use is positively correlated with alcohol use and cigarette use, as well as illegal drugs like cocaine and methamphetamine.

      "This does not mean that everyone who uses marijuana will transition to using heroin or other drugs, but it does mean that people who use marijuana also consume more, not less, legal and illegal drugs than do people who do not use marijuana."

      https://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2 … teway-drug

      https://www.ctpost.com/local/article/Ya … 805532.php

      http://www.columbia.edu/cu/record/archi … 10.24.html

      1. PrettyPanther profile image83
        PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        I was referring to the effects of having legal access to marijuana.

        https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2018/04/02/legal-marijuana-states-have-lower-opioid-use-new-studies-show/#607a30b35696

        Not mentioned in the article: Purchasing marijuana illegally from a drug dealer inevitably exposes the buyer to other drugs offered by the dealer. Purchasing from a legal dispensary obviously does not expose the buyer to other illegal drugs.

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          For teenagers, going to a party with alcohol and marijuana leads to impaired judgment at that party and consumption of harder drugs.

          I saw it many times during my wilder days.

          1. PrettyPanther profile image83
            PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Yes, but that happens whether it is legal or not.

            1. promisem profile image97
              promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              Making it legal creates the potential for making it happen more often.

              I agree with your point that illegal access potentially exposes the buyer to illegal drugs, but to requote you, that happens whether it's legal or not.

              Maybe the bigger question is a moral one. Should we as a society legalize everything that is harmful to an individual because it is the individual's choice?

              If so, we should legalize cocaine, heroin and prostitution for all of the same reasons that everyone is citing here for the legalization of marijuana.

              1. PrettyPanther profile image83
                PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                I actually do believe we should  decriminalize the use of all drugs.

                I feel less strongly about legalitzing and regulating prostitution but I am open to considering it.

                1. promisem profile image97
                  promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                  That's quite a Libertarian point of view, which suggest you believe society has no role in protecting people from harming themselves.

                  There remains the question of their cost to society as a result of their self-destructive behavior.

                  1. PrettyPanther profile image83
                    PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                    I think that throwing people in jail for doing drugs doesn't help anyone. There should be consequences for endangering others, such as driving under the influence, or neglecting your kids while under the influence, or stealing to maintain a habit. But simply using  drugs should not be a crime. That's how we handle alcohol, right? If I want to down three shots of bourbon every night, then crawl into bed feeling warm and happy with a blood alcohol level of .12, who cares? Same with any drug. If, however, I take drugs and drive, or drink three shots then head off to work as a taxi driver, that's different and should be illegal.

        2. Castlepaloma profile image74
          Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          Too bad that had great knowledge about marrijanna in dispensaries.

          Will be replace by drug store and alcohol stores for sales. It all about the money, not so much the health benefits and moderation of natural herb.

      2. Readmikenow profile image95
        Readmikenowposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Interesting.  The son of a cousin asked me a good question about this very topic.  It was, "Can legal marijuana cause any more problems than legal alcohol use has done for centuries?" So, I had to think about it.  Ever since there has been alcohol, there have been alcoholics.  Isn't the same personality type that is prone to being addicted to alcohol also prone to being addicted to legal marijuana?  Also, from a practical standpoint, we can save law enforcement resources being used to arrest and prosecute marijuana offenders and use them toward more serious criminal activity.  Also, it takes money away from the drug dealers and provides the state governments with another tax revenue source.  So, it is a bit of a complicated issue.

        1. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          I remember reading an interesting point relative to your comment about legalizing pot taking money away from drug dealers Readmikenow.

          The story, about Colorado's legalization, noted that the street dealers loved it. The dispensary pot, due to taxes and real business costs, was so expensive it made street pot a bargain. Plus, now that it was legal to possess, (for users - not for dealers), the police didn't devote nearly as much effort to catch the street dealers.

          How about that, a win-win.

          GA

      3. RJ Schwartz profile image90
        RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        This passage was copied from WebMD - "People with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders may be more likely to use marijuana heavily, about twice a month. Researchers have also found links between cannabis use and bipolar disorder, major depression, and childhood anxiety. What’s hard to untangle is if marijuana use leads to mental illness, or if it’s the other way around."  The last sentence really makes you think.

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          There is a 40% correlation between mental illness and substance abuse. It's a chicken and egg situation.

          Some people have addictive personalities. Others suffer a serious trauma -- rape, sexual assault or war experiences -- which trigger a descent into mental illnesses and substance abuse.

          They use alcohol and drugs as a form of self medication.

          1. RJ Schwartz profile image90
            RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Based on that logic, how would legalizing change things?  Some people are prone to addiction and others aren't.

            1. promisem profile image97
              promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              I guess I see it as another step toward letting people do whatever they want even if they harm themselves in the process -- at a cost to society as a whole.

              We legalized gambling and loan sharing nationwide. We now allow liquor sales on Sundays. We lifted the alcohol limits on beer and wine.

              On the flip side, we need more services and money dedicated to treating people with addictions to alcohol, gambling, marijuana and opiods. Not to mention the impact on families, work productivity, etc.

              1. Castlepaloma profile image74
                Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                There are many companies who do drug test, marrijanna stays in your system for a month, where Alcohol and less cocaine stays just a day or two.

                I'VE hired close to 2000 people, in my art profession. Only a couple of times I fired employees who did not use drugs in moderation.

            2. Castlepaloma profile image74
              Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              True

          2. Castlepaloma profile image74
            Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Goverments should have nothing to do with what goes in or out of our bodies, it's our natural given right.

            Find a doctor who serves you best, or be like me. I am my own best doctor in the world for most part.

            1. promisem profile image97
              promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              Government should very much have something to do with what goes in or out of out bodies if it's harmful to the rest of us.

              Drug addiction is harmful to society, which is why we need laws protecting us from it.

              1. PrettyPanther profile image83
                PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                Does jailing people for using drugs actually do much to protect society from the effects of addiction? It seems to cause more harm than good. A poor person's life is ruined because they are jailed for using drugs while a rich person hires lawyers to protect them and gets placed in posh rehab facilities. That's a vast generalization, but generally speaking, the "war on drugs" has, in reality, been a war on poor, non-white people.

                1. promisem profile image97
                  promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                  That's a good question, and fortunately, some courts are getting better about it.

                  I recently attended a "Drug Court" graduation as part of my volunteer work. People who go through drug court have been found guilty of drug offenses but avoid jail time if they complete the program, which includes regular drug testing.

                  FYI, they were all white and employed. Their lives weren't ruined by their conviction. if anything, their lives were improved by getting caught.

                  However, some judges are not so caring and compassionate. So in reality, some lives get ruined by the court system and some do not.

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image74
                    Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                    The new law in Canada

                    legislation proposes that people under age 18 would not face criminal prosecution for possessing or sharing up to five grams. Yet heavily fine or up to 14 years for anyone selling to under  the age of 18.

              2. Castlepaloma profile image74
                Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                Prohibitions & war on drugs has never worked. The War on Drugs Is Inseparable from US Imperialism. Much of the world used to treat drug addiction as a health issue, not a criminal one. And then America got its way.

                First marrijanna prohibited they called the Mexican drug in 1936, based on Racism.. In 1972 a formal US Declaration of war on drugs.  Back then in 1936 North America had 50,000 user of marrijanna, today 150 million have tried marrijanna in North America. What is the score on the war on drugs? About 1,000 for drug lobbyist who can't compete with cannabis products vs. public 1.

                You can't say NO to kids and give no good reasons such as  propaganda films like reefer madness and Pubic enemy number one, we had to watch in school.  Where women turn to whores and men into serial killers. One film had a guy take one tok from a reefer, than went into wild illusions, running fast around a room screaming like a chicken than crushed through windows and plummet to his death. Us kids looked at each and said. WHERE CAN WE GET THAT SH*T.

                Have more trust in the majority of Americans rather than the world's champion of liar's.

        2. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          RJ, your quote gives me something else to think about ... they consider twice a month heavy usage?????? I would think it should be more like twice a week.

          GA

          1. promisem profile image97
            promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            LOL. Even twice a week is not heavy usage. I have known people who smoked pot three and four times a day.

            1. Castlepaloma profile image74
              Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              Lol. In my youth, I use to smoke 3 or 4 times a week and swam 10,000 meters every day.
              Must of forgot to go to rehab.

              1. promisem profile image97
                promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                Your point being you were an addict for smoking pot 3 or 4 times a week? If so, you were not even close to being addicted.

            2. GA Anderson profile image92
              GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              LOL right back at you promisem. That was the statement I wanted to make, but, I didn't want to open any doors for intuitive assumptions. Like, really, so just how is that you were in a position to observe that ...

              So I just let the point be made that I felt the heavy usage number was a strange one.

              GA

              1. promisem profile image97
                promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                I grew up in a neighborhood where drugs were common. I saw what they did to a lot of people. I made it out of there, and quite a few didn't.

          2. RJ Schwartz profile image90
            RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            I was thinking twice in the morning and twice at night...or more to be considered a heavy user and more of the same every day.

            1. GA Anderson profile image92
              GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              yep, just noted something similar to promisem's comment about it.

              GA

      4. Castlepaloma profile image74
        Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        This gateway drug of pot.
        Makes about as much sense as milk leads to bear.

    2. Glenis Rix profile image96
      Glenis Rixposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Can you point us in the direction of the evidence? I am of the opinion that marijuana is a step towards more dangerous drugs.

  3. GA Anderson profile image92
    GA Andersonposted 16 months ago

    I also think marijuana should be legal, and regulated as we do alcohol.

    I think it is an individual choice in an area where the government has no business dictating our choices.

    I do not believe marijuana use, either its impairment or addiction consequences, has the degree of harm, (or potential harm), to society to warrant government prohibition.

    GA

    1. RJ Schwartz profile image90
      RJ Schwartzposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      I'm a firm believer that alcohol and tobacco both do more harm to individuals and society when compared to marijuana.  From everything I read, there has never been an overdose/death incident from marijuana (if anyone has a link to the contrary, please share it - this is a good discussion so far)

      1. promisem profile image97
        promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        "Several studies have shown that drivers with THC in their blood were roughly twice as likely to be responsible for a deadly crash or be killed than drivers who hadn't used drugs or alcohol."

        https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/ … ed-driving

    2. promisem profile image97
      promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      A large amount of your local, state and federal tax dollars go to preventing and treating the addiction epidemic in this country. That includes marijuana.

      Our local county agency, which relies on millions of dollars annually from the above sources, is already treating as many people with marijuana addiction as alcohol addiction.

      1. Readmikenow profile image95
        Readmikenowposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        So, now it's possible to get tax revenue from the sale of legal marijuana as well as the legal of sale of alcohol.  Prohibition didn't work.  The government decided to get the tax revenue from legal alcohol sales.  It destroyed the gin running industry.  Is marijuana any different?  Like alcohol sales, it legal sale will generate significant tax revenue. People will do it no matter what the government does, so why not tax it and let society benefit form additional tax revenue and less investment of law enforcement to stop it? There is not a system in the world or in history that has been able to stop people who have addictive personalities to get addicted to something.

        1. PrettyPanther profile image83
          PrettyPantherposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          I agree with this. I also think it is wrong to jail people for simply using drugs. Driving while under the influence is a different matter and still against the law in states with legalized recreational marijuana.

        2. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          Those are good questions. Our country had the same rationale when it legalized gambling, loan sharking, alcohol on Sundays and removed most limits on total alcohol content in beers and wine.

          But does that mean we should make it easier for them to get addicted?

          Should we legalize prostitution for the same reason?

          1. Readmikenow profile image95
            Readmikenowposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Well, there is legal prostitution in some parts of the country.  It is legal in other countries.  It is known as the oldest profession.  So, I don't know, I suppose that's up to the individual area for resident to decide if they want it or not.  Banning prostitution is about as effective as banning guns.

      2. GA Anderson profile image92
        GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        I certainly don't have any support to argue your point promisem, but a quick look around found that only about 9% of marijuana users meet the professional determination of addiction.

        Plus, it seems that professional addiction determination is more than just a little subjective.

        That isn't mentioned to 'officially' contradict your alcoholism comparison, it just that anecdotally, I wouldn't see that comparison.

        GA

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          That percentage is climbing with the increase in THC levels.

          What percentage has to be addicted before you would consider it a threat to society?

          Are you comfortable with getting taxed to treat marijuana addicts?

          https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-a … is-growing

          1. GA Anderson profile image92
            GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            I understand your point about the increased THC level promisem, and I don't know of an addiction percentage to peg it to, but if it was in the neighborhood of heroin or crack cocaine I would consider it a threat.

            In principle I think those drugs should also be a personal choice - with no government interference, but ... for me, that principle is superseded by the one that dictates if I choose to live in a society, then my Rights of choice must end when it is at the expense of others. Heroin and crack-type drug use choices fall in that category - for me.

            Regarding paying for marijuana addicts, if I am to be taxed for addiction treatment programs, then the drug of the addiction is of no matter. So yes, I would be comfortable being taxed for that.

            GA

  4. Aime F profile image82
    Aime Fposted 16 months ago

    I support legalization. It makes absolutely no sense to prohibit it when alcohol and tobacco are legal.

    1. promisem profile image97
      promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      I agree it's illogical. But at the same time, that illogic justifies making cocaine and heroin legal, as they were many years ago.

      1. Aime F profile image82
        Aime Fposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        Not really, because alcohol and nicotine are both more addictive and have more severe side effects and withdrawal symptoms.  It makes sense to me to determine whether something should be prohibited or not based on potential harm.  The potential harm of marijuana is not comparable to that of cocaine and heroin.

        1. promisem profile image97
          promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          The potential harm in marijuana includes an addiction rate close to alcohol and cigarettes, the treatment cost to society and the risk for people who graduate to harder drugs.

          With all due respect, I believe people who claim that marijuana is not harmful are basing that opinion on old information when THC levels were much lower.

          As I said before, the agency where I volunteer is seeing as many people for marijuana addiction as for alcohol problems.

          Colorado is a good example of what I mean. Hospitalizations for teens using marijuana has quadrupled since it became legal.

          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 … 083114.htm

          The basic point remains: Why legalize something that is addictive and costly to society?

          1. Aime F profile image82
            Aime Fposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            I’m wondering what you’re basing your assertion that marijuana is close to being as addictive as alcohol/nicotine on?  That’s pretty contrary to everything I’ve ever read/learned about this topic.

            I don’t think harm needs to be a black and white issue, if you say anything that potentially causes harm needs to be illegal then you hit a pretty slippery slope.

            Should caffeine be illegal?  Caffeine is more addictive than marijuana and the withdrawal symptoms tend to be more severe.

            1. promisem profile image97
              promisemposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              Everything we hear is largely based on information that is getting out of date because of rising THC levels.

              Alcohol use disorder is about 7%.

              https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-healt … statistics

              About 16% of the total population smokes cigarettes, but there are no clear answers about how many might be considered addicted. It's safe to say it's at least in the low teens if not lower.

              Marijuana is 9 to 30% depending on the study and how they define addiction versus disorder.

              https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/ … ijuana#ref

              To my point about the changing circumstances, you might want to read the article below. Note this paragraph:

              "A study of use in Colorado published in 2015 found increases in marijuana-related traffic deaths, hospital visits, school suspensions, lab explosions and pet poisonings. In that study, marijuana-related ER visits increased 57% from 2011 to 2013."

              https://www.cnn.com/2016/02/24/health/c … index.html

              Yes, it's a slippery slope. But I don't think we should legalize it without serious debate about the consequences.

              And by the way, there is growing propaganda about it. Some companies are salivating at the billions of dollars they will make.

              1. Readmikenow profile image95
                Readmikenowposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                Okay, I agree with you that there are people who become addicted to marijuana, and alcohol.  What the information you provided does not show is how many people don't become addicted and use it responsibly.  So, if the majority of people who use it are responsible, don't become addicted, why would anyone consider banning it?  I don't like living in a society where responsible people are punished because you have others who aren't responsible.  I've been drinking alcohol since I was of legal age (I'm sticking to that one).  So have most of my friends and family with no problem.  So, if we smoked marijuana with no problem, why should we have it taken away because others can't handle it?

                1. GA Anderson profile image92
                  GA Andersonposted 16 months agoin reply to this

                  "So, if the majority of people who use it are responsible ...

                  ... why should we have it taken away because others can't handle it?"


                  Good point Readmikenow, I agree, but good luck defending it.

                  GA

  5. Kathryn L Hill profile image78
    Kathryn L Hillposted 16 months ago

    It is not an each-to-his-own matter. The consequences of pot/THC smoking and or ingesting affect us all. For one thing, it is injurious to the youth. They should not be exposed to it as they are now. The smoke wafts into the nursery, or over the fence into the neighbor kid's yard. The brownies in the fridge are consumed or taken to school and shared.
    It, (THC) should be illegal and it should be an expensive fine. No jail time.

    Simple.

    I hope the Fed sticks to its guns.

    Just say No to pot/THC, as a matter of wise public policy.

  6. Ladymermaid profile image88
    Ladymermaidposted 16 months ago

    October 17th pot will be legal in Canada. I am very pleased with this decision as I want it to be regulated. I just wish that it were treated more like alcohol or drugs in where it is available for sale but it is up to each province to decide on how it will be sold in their area.

    1. Ken Burgess profile image92
      Ken Burgessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      Look to Washington state, they have had legal weed for awhile with no issues, no increased crime, no drama....I have known lots of people that have a few puffs to ease stress, anxiety, depression, arthritic pain etc.

      The only people that won’t like the legalization of weed are those that have been brainwashed into thinking it is a bad/illegal 'drug' and pharmaceutical companies, because they know people would stop buying their over priced, sometimes dangerous side effects, addictive medications.


      Truth, almost all cures can be found in nature, this was always the way of it, a hundred years ago medicine was herbs/plants and doctors were herbalists, and understood how things interact with the body in ways most Doctors couldn't understand today.


      Medicine and technology has come a long way, but has taken things to an extreme, often doing more harm than good, treating things with drugs when a better understanding of natural cures could be more beneficial.

      Three times doctors told me I had to be operated on, and three times I ignored them, researched the matter, and found natural cures.  This is the nature of the beast in America today, an effort to make all things illegal, up to and including growing your own food in your yard... Big Pharma, Monsanto/Bayer, the Food Industry, all conspire to push politicians into writing laws that make it illegal for you to be anything more than a slave to the corporate system and buy their product and their cures.


      The benefits of marijuana far outweigh the negatives, and are far less damaging to people than alcohol or tobacco.

      1. wilderness profile image95
        wildernessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        "The benefits of marijuana far outweigh the negatives, and are far less damaging to people than alcohol or tobacco."

        We'll find out in 20-50 years.  Until then such a statement is without foundation.

        1. Ken Burgess profile image92
          Ken Burgessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          Speak for yourself... I know people who have smoked for the last 20-50 years and they are far better off for 'self-medicating' than they would have been taking psychotropic prescribed drugs.

          Anything you can grow in your back yard, is better for you than those processed chemicals they would have you take as its replacement.

          If you need 20-50 years to access the situation, good luck, but I'm happy with the beliefs based on experiences that I have.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            With that I can agree - you may draw conclusions as to long term social results based on a few friend's experience for a few years.

            I choose not to, recognizing that it takes a long time to get long term results.

        2. Castlepaloma profile image74
          Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          Yes!
          +++
          Give a herb and peace a chance.

          1. wilderness profile image95
            wildernessposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Not quite so sanguine about "giving a chance".  Offhand, I can't think of a single non-food chemical that has been inserted into the human body long term with any positive results.

            Certainly alcohol, tobacco, peyote, LSD, heroin, opioids - basically anything that disrupts the natural function of brain or body - has eventually been shown to have very negative long term results.  Results that are ignored in favor of short term gain, with inevitable consequences.

            So why "give a herb" a chance when there is such a tremendous record of failure?  Because it feels good in the short term?

            1. Castlepaloma profile image74
              Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

              When you have most states in the US approve marrijanna as a useful medicine, that should be proof that the Federal schedule 1 marrijanna is nothing than a big fat lie for 82 years now.

              Dr. Oz  talks about America’s pot “hypocrisy” In 2014,  majority of Americans voiced support for legalization for the first time in the history of the General Social Survey.
              In 2015, colleges were teaching business courses in marijuana.
              Oz said, “people think it’s a gateway drug to narcotics. It may be the exit drug to get us out of the narcotic epidemic.

              Hemp
              Complete Protein
              Gluten-free
              Dairy-free
              High in Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids
              Cannabis Leaf
              Rich source of fibre
              Flavonoids
              9 Essential Amino acids
              Essential oils
              Magnesium
              Calcium
              Phosphorous
              Cannabis Seeds
              Protein
              Carbohydrates
              Insoluble fibre
              Beta-carotene
              Phosphorous potassium
              Magnesium
              Sulphur
              Calcium
              Iron
              Zinc
              Vitamins E, C, B1, B3, B6 essential fatty acids.
              Cannabis as a Superfood
              Looking at the facts around marijuana, it seems pretty hard to argue against the clear evidence that it provides many of the nutrients believed to be vital for a healthy life. So as a dark leafy green that is 100% natural, should we start looking towards cannabis in the same way we look at kale, spinach and all of the other popular ‘Superfoods’ that have taken the world by storm.

              Why wait so long to find out damage cannabis effects to US society. India and China know most of the cannabis benefits for 1000s of years and have no negative effects to reports to warn us about.

  7. Castlepaloma profile image74
    Castlepalomaposted 16 months ago

    I predicted on hub pages 7 years ago that marrijanna would not be crime in 15 years and same sex marriage in 20 years for most countries in the world to be legalized.

    Time of prediction Canada was the only one with legal same sex marriage. So far today, same sex marriage is legal in 26 countries and marrijanna is legal in 2 countries.  If you get caught with a joint in your mouth, make sure it is a guy.

    Seven years ago most on Hub pages ridicule me for pushing, marrijanna to be legal. Calling me a stoner, or criminal for taking pot on occasion. It is the only herb I will take for sleep twice a month. Pot for a party has never had side effects other than making me happy, horny, sleepy and hungry. Only deep concern is being busted, that would ruin my life, over a plant, that is the most productive and useful cannabis plant species on earth.

    Even though I generally take drugs less than most of you online, I like my head clear. When half of people out there try marrijanna, shows you, they don't respect the law, because the Federal law does not respect them.

    Canada will lead again.  US will try to stay will their guns, til flower power takes over. Trust a leaf.

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image78
      Kathryn L Hillposted 16 months agoin reply to this

      The US is not like Canada. The US has higher standards, more freedom and more energy.

      The US is on a higher plane than Canada, so anyone from Canada can hear what I have to say and stop advocating what is just fine for Canada:     
         Mind-numbness.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image74
        Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

        If your talking high energy in millionaire and billionaire. Coal, gas, and fracking and so many other synthetic products, US can have it.

        If you want a haven for lawyers, drug Cartels , prison guards,  cops, drug stores,  booze, casinos, military and more prison cells than college dooms.  US is high on that too. Keeping marrijanna illegal allows Trump to lead US to the dirty swamplands with orgies of greed.

        If you want a higher standard of freedom, education and health, Canada is a place you ought to be. Yet, still I can find even better places.

        1. Kathryn L Hill profile image78
          Kathryn L Hillposted 16 months agoin reply to this

          yeah, and you will not have the prosperity or the freedom either.
          Yes, we have problems ... problems brought about by good intentions.

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5TS8QU … DskGf6kwHQ

          1. Castlepaloma profile image74
            Castlepalomaposted 16 months agoin reply to this

            Interesting film.

            Once had an opposing lawyer, tell me good intentions all leads to the road to hell. I wondered if they we're the same people that said, you can't have your cake and eat it too. If I were a black man I would move to Canada.

            I wore a T-shirt with an elephant laying on the ground with many turkeys siting on him.
            It said, don't let the turkeys get you down.

 
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