Reparations - Is it a Realistic Conversation?

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  1. Live to Learn profile image81
    Live to Learnposted 11 months ago

    With several democratic presidential hopefuls using the carrot of reparations as a vote getter, can someone tell me how it would work and what it would accomplish?

    If you think a group owes another group something, based on skin color, who benefits? And who in those groups? Would it be all men, women and children? Would it be per household? I'm very confused on that point.

    I honestly don't see how we would determine who, given that many are of mixed race heritage, would qualify. If we set some kind of litmus test you had to pass, wouldn't a large group feel disenfranchised?

    And the monetary consideration baffles me. How much? Wouldn't any amount be an insult if you feel you are behind, due to skin color, alone?

    I just think trying to come up with a plan would insult, antagonize and exacerbate.

    I'd really like to hear from someone who feels they are owed, how much they think should be paid and what groups they feel should be included. Also, would the group include all men, women and children? Just heads of households? Etc,

    1. GA Anderson profile image92
      GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      I can't respond to what you are asking Live to Learn, but I can't resist the opportunity to say that I think promoting this issue to voters is the most insulting and vote-hunting pandering I can think of. I would never vote for a candidate promoting this.

      As your questions note, this is an unrealistic and unworkable idea. I can't see any purpose other than I described.

      The term race-baiting comes to mind. My perspective is that if I were a reasonably intelligent black person I would be insulted.

      GA

      1. Live to Learn profile image81
        Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        I'd have to agree that it appears to be race baiting. I'm hoping someone of reasonable intelligence who is in favor of such can provide answers.

      2. gmwilliams profile image85
        gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        THANK YOU, Mr. Anderson.   The idea of reparations for slavery is totally ludicrous into idiotic.  Slavery is in the past.   Yes, it is race baiting & further exacerbates the victim, rescue me, & owe me mentality.

        1. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          That seems a fair point Grace(?).

          GA

          1. gmwilliams profile image85
            gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            It is a fair point.  I totally agree. I further maintain the victim mentality is a sign of immature weakness.   All ethnic groups have endured discrimination w/o exception.   They fought to overcome.   Think about the Irish- they have endured hell in Britain for years.  They also endured harsh discrimination in America until they banded together to overcome discrimination.   The Jews went through hell in Europe.  The Jews in World War II were almost wiped out.  They have fought to overcome discrimination.   Neither the Irish nor the Jews adopted victim, owe me, nor rescue me mentalities.   They refused to be weak, they FOUGHT to overcome their discrimination!

            I am Black.   My late mother was from South Carolina & my father was from the American Virgin Islands.   From my observation, many Blacks have adopted the victim mentality.  They see everything as racism.   They want to blame slavery & racism for the occurrences in their environment.    This is prevalent among Black Americans.   They have adopted the passive, slave mentality.  Many Black Americans view the government as their parent & savior.  They imbue their children with this philosophy.  I am talking about middle class Black Americans here.  They depend upon the government to save them from gentrification & help make their lives better.  They are, on average, Democrats & whatever the Democratic Party does is great in their purview.

            The Black American community has to become more proactive if they want to be respected.  They have to concentrate on socioeconomics &relevant education which will grant them jobs.  According to Dr. Claud Anderson, a Black political strategist, Blacks are at the bottom of American society because they have properly strategized socioeconomically like the other ethnic groups have.  Dr. Anderson asserts that Blacks only relied on political power but political power is nothing w/o socioeconomic power.  Blacks have to learn that socioeconomic power is the key to gaining respect & having other groups seen them as strong instead of weak.  The issue of reparations is considered begging hence a sign of weakness.  Blacks have to break away from the weakness mentality.

            1. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
              Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              "Blacks have to break away from the weakness mentality."

              How?
              How can  a n y o n e  break away from weakness-mentality?
              How does it develop?
              How can it be changed into strength-mentality?

              Of course these types of changes must start in the childhood of an individual before the age of fifteen. That's why I advocate good preschools  for three to four year olds in black neighborhoods.

              According to the vision, the children will have freedom in these schools, but they are not really to schools. They are more like home environments, but institutionalized. The environment will provide freely chosen learning activities in math, reading and writing. The child will be given boundaries in order to reap the benefits of freedom. Its a new direction in eduction and will eventually take hold like wild fire. Someday people will understand and see for themselves how this method works over typical school methods.
              There are some schools out there that provide freedom, rather than force and stifling structure, such as Waldorf and (some) Montessori schools.

              1. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                That's only part of it. Research has demonstrated that White and Black kids on par with each other in math until about fifth grade. What happens then? Research has shown these children of color begin to receive subtle signals that they cannot perform math, etc. Likewise, meeting and seeing role models who are successful plays a part in success. The positive reinforcement must be ongoing. Also, these children of color are penalized for not having specific cultural knowledge as opposed to a true measurement of intelligence.

                1. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
                  Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  ... "penalized" by who? and who is giving them "subtle signals" of not being able to perform math, "etc." and what do you mean "etc." ?

                  1. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                    Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    What does etc. mean in your world? Obviously, I'm referring to other subjects. Also, who is providing instruction? So, those are the ones who would send these messages. There is an area known as "comprehensive reading."

                  2. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
                    Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    I was wondering why you only mentioned math. Specifically, other subjects such as: _________________
                    _______________________
                    ________________________

                2. Credence2 profile image80
                  Credence2posted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  I always wondered with the mathematical genius and contribution of the Black ladies featured on the film "Hidden Figures" focusing on successful launches of space vehicles during the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo programs were "hidden" for so long?

                  Was the concealment of these positive role models an imperative such as network fear of offending white audiences as the explanation as to why "Julia" (1966 NBC) featured a widowed nurse (Dianne Carroll) and her son rather than the standard complete nuclear family that typically included a father like we saw on the Donna Reed Show?

                  When you talk about role models and brain washing, this culture is far from innocent.

                  1. gmwilliams profile image85
                    gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    Blacks were always anathemas in American culture & society. Blacks were considered "the other".  Blacks were the symbologies of what was considered either forbidden, taboo, or the worst aspects of American culture & society.   Blacks were deemed as the inferior element since the time of Columbus in the modern Western/European mindset.   

                    Western/Caucasian people when they so-called conquered the Americas & colonized Africa & some parts of Asia, had to designate the natives, Africans, & Asians in their purview as inferior.  They wouldn't accept that natives, Africans, & Asians were the same as they were.  That would be totally immobilizing to them.   They couldn't accept that there were cultures & societies just as legitimate as theirs.

                  2. Live to Learn profile image81
                    Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    You always look from a black male perspective. Women, in general, were seen as second class citizens so the hidden figures (which I'll have to read about) if black women, would have been hidden whether black or white.

                    As to Julia, the rate of children being born out of wedlock in the black community began its catastrophic rise in the sixties. It was almost 40% at the time the show aired, with no reason to believe it was going to level out. Perhaps, looking at a show focusing on a black family which included a father in the home seemed unrealistic to the producers. Perhaps, the inclusion of a husband who had passed away was a reference to the death of the perceived nuclear family within the community.

                    I'm not saying that blacks didn't need the civil rights movement to help level the playing field at the time but I think to ignore that the civil rights movement started some unfortunate trends within the black community which have exacerbated its ability to increase its own wealth causes a rift that makes it difficult to discuss solutions.

                  3. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                    Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    I agree. I always mention the participation of Blacks in the Revolutionary War, inventing things like stop lights, and how algebra and geometry were first conceived of and used in Africa - to my students. Simply put: if you don't know anything about your contributions to civilization you will act in a devalued manner. This is a simple truth. Unfortunately, we have to have a Black history month, which to me highlights the symptoms of the problem. These things should be taught right along side the ongoing history courses. It only takes a few minutes to mention such things, and I've encouraged fellow educators to do the same.
                    It's unfortunate to have this month because it spotlights, the differences so dramatically as opposed to saying, "These people were all there together throughout American history. That includes women." My students were blown away when they discovered that Edison's idea for the first filament for lights came from a Black man. Shouldn't these things be mentioned as history is taught?

                3. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                  Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  Algebra, history, etc. again.

                  1. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
                    Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    etc.= English, reading and writing?
                     
                    "Also, these children of color are penalized for not having specific cultural knowledge as opposed to a true measurement of intelligence."

                    Specific cultural knowledge = _______________________________

                    ( It is important to accurately identify the difficulties in order to deal with them ... and solve the problems.)

            2. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
              Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              exactly.

            3. GA Anderson profile image92
              GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              Well, if you give me a week or two I will try to find something to argue with in your comment.

              However, as a non-Black, I am not optimistic about my chances for success.;-)

              1. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                Color is not required for an objective rational mind, which you demonstrate, G.A. The system is broke, poor white, hispanic, black, etc. need that reinforcement from the beginning. Fix the whole thing, money just ain't gonna solve that. We agree on that. But I don't doubt our fortitude, another thing we can agree on. Who said democracy is easy?
                I think you can find the strong mind, hard working, and even odds busting person in every class. That's how we roll as Americans.
                You have probably read stories of the young drug dealers who were caught and said things like, "I want to run a business." O.K. after they pay their dues, help them make that happen with a tax break and some training to be successful business people.

                1. GA Anderson profile image92
                  GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  Tim, there was one point in the GMwilliams comment that bothers me. That point was relative to non-US blacks. The reference to Virgin Island, (her specific example), black folks, or Jamaicans, or Haitians, having a stronger work ethic and weaker victimization culture.

                  That point bothers me because I see it as true, but I cannot be sure what it means that I see it that way. Do I see it as true because it plainly seems to be so, or because of some inherent "white" perspective that skews my thinking? Am I wrongly characterizing an entire group because of my personal anecdotal observations of a few examples?

                  All most of us can do is form opinions based on our own perspectives, and by that token, I think GM's point is right. And I think her perspective on reparations relative to that point is also right. That is one of the reasons I am no longer a supporter of any kind of Black Affirmative Actions, (like your tax break idea) - I think such efforts, in these times, only further reinforce the victim mentality.

                  But even so, I cannot be sure my opinion is untainted.

                  GA

                  1. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
                    Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                    Yes, but even among immigrants, there are people who do not want to engage in constructive activities. I've met a few of those along with others who did not want to actively participate in the American experience. Hard work is not the property of one group. Likewise, we should give tax breaks to those impoverished Americans wanting to start businesses (we do that for multinationals, not based in our nation.) We can tax these new businesses after they get going after a few years. That way, we receive a return on an investment to better society. It will also have the added benefit of giving people an opportunity to help correct economic inequities. Such a program has not been tried nationally.

    2. profile image75
      Hxprofposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      "And the monetary consideration baffles me. How much? Wouldn't any amount be an insult if you feel you are behind, due to skin color, alone?"

      "I just think trying to come up with a plan would insult, antagonize and exacerbate."

      These two points alone are sufficient to demonstrate the futility of trying to implement such a program.

      1. Live to Learn profile image81
        Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        I've been thinking about it. The only way I'd be on board for a possible solution (if affordable) is if it was voted and approved with at least a 2/3 to 3/4 margin by the target demographic.

        I'm not inclined to throw more money and resources at a problem that, I fear, the solution won't address the victim mentality of those demanding reparations.

        1. gmwilliams profile image85
          gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Reparations for slavery is stupid.  What is PAST is PAST.   People should stop asking for monies- America has a deficit as it is.   Slavery is PAST, forget about it!  MOVE ON...……..educate yourselves & your children, don't have children unless you can afford to give them myriad educational & socioeconomic opportunities, & have SMALL families.    Let me add, get married or be in a committed relationship before HAVING CHILDREN.   Stop whining about the PAST.   Every racial & ethnic group endured hardship-GET OVER IT!

    3. promisem profile image98
      promisemposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      I don't know if I am owed or if I should pay for the following reasons:

      1. My great great grandfather and his brother died fighting for the North to free the slaves. Does that mean I should get reparations because of my family's loss or likewise should I not have to pay?

      2. My family came from a state where slavery was illegal. Should only the states that had legal slavery pay the reparations?

      3. England, Spain, France and Holland introduced slavery here and controlled the territories for more than 150 years. Should they pay the reparations instead?

      1. profile image75
        Hxprofposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Perhaps only descendants of families that owned slaves would be responsible to pay - seems reasonable to me.

    4. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
      Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      It's an idea that wouldn't work. However, a more important question is: Does the right even recognize that there has been systems in place which have created challenges based on race? Or is this where the "color-blind" thing plays out? Yet, if you are going to provide funding to descendants of slaves - from my reading of history - many poor Whites were treated just as bad as "indentured servants." Every group in America bore the whip at some point. Here, I'm thinking about the Irish. It's a fact: in the swampy lands of the South, slave owners sent out the Irish to clear lands because they felt slaves were too valuable.
      Besides, there would be challenges to this thinking legally.

      1. gmwilliams profile image85
        gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        The Irish also caught hell in America.  However, they eventually fought to overcome discrimination through socioeconomics & political power.

        1. Tim Truzy info4u profile image97
          Tim Truzy info4uposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          That's what I was talking about, did you not read my post in its entirety? in the South the slaves were more valuable than the Irish at some point. They have not completely recovered, the Irish or Blacks. However, nobody from the right has acknowledged whether or not systems were put in place which did reduce access for people based on color. Interesting.
          It's ironic I keep reading about the "weak" minded, victim mind set of Black Americans in this forum? Obviously, that can't be completely true? (Colin Powell, Clarence Thomas, Thurgood Marshall, Barack Obama, Oprah, Venus and Serena Williams, Michael Jordan, and so on) were these men and women a part of the victim mentality? That "weak" minded crap goes back to the labeling aspect of the symptoms of the problem. Case in point, the Williams sisters came from a pretty rough neighborhood to succeed in a sport dominated by White females. (Please, read this post in its entirety and don't miss sections.)
          The barriers to denying access must be corrected or the right is hiding something and there will continue to be these misdirected discussions which focus on the fact some Americans refuse to even acknowledge that Jim Crow, segregation, or discrimination has had an impact on access and equality.
          We can begin by removing labels such as "weak-minded,"

  2. IslandBites profile image87
    IslandBitesposted 11 months ago

    Who are the candidates? (I honestly don't know). What I was reading is this (but maybe some have change their minds?) Don't know about the rest.

    Kamala Harris, California senator
    Position? Noncommittal.

    What she has said: “I think that the word, the term reparations, it means different things to different people. But what I mean by it is that we need to study the effects of generations of discrimination and institutional racism and determine what can be done, in terms of intervention, to correct course.”

    What she has proposed: The Lift Act, a bill introduced by Harris, would provide a universal tax credit to families with an annual income under $100,000 of up to $500 a month. Harris argues the policy would help lift “60% of black families across the nation” out of poverty.


    Elizabeth Warren, Massachusetts senator
    Position? Tentative support.

    What she has said: “We must confront the dark history of slavery and government-sanctioned discrimination in this country that has had many consequences including undermining the ability of black families to build wealth in America for generations.”

    What she has proposed: The American Housing and Economic Mobility Act is a bill introduced by Warren, in an effort to tackle America’s housing affordability crisis. The bill includes specific provisions to use federal funding from the housing department to assist first-time buyers in mostly minority neighbourhoods that were once redlined. Warren has also voiced support for a bill in the House of Representatives that seeks to establish a commission on reparations.


    Julián Castro, former San Antonio mayor
    Position? Tentative support.

    What he has said: “If under the constitution we compensate people because we take their property, why wouldn’t you compensate people who actually were property.”

    What he has proposed: Castro has said that, if elected, he would create a taskforce or appoint a commissioner to examine the issue of monetary reparations to those who can trace their ancestry back to slavery.


    Cory Booker, New Jersey senator
    Position? Noncommittal.

    What he has said: “A lot of the programs that built the middle class in this country, African Americans were excluded from … You had devaluations of American communities through mortgage lending and the like.”

    What he has proposed: Booker has introduced the American Opportunity Accounts Act, a bill that seeks to address the wealth gap by creating a trust account for every baby born in America, irrespective of racial or class background. The trust would receive annual deposits related directly to family income. These so-called baby bonds would be withdrawable once the child reaches 18 and could only be spent on purchasing property or to pay for higher education or training.


    Bernie Sanders, Vermont senator
    Position? Opposed.

    What he has said: “I think that right now, our job is to address the crisis facing the American people and our communities, and I think there are better ways to do that than just writing out a check.”

    What he has proposed: While he has explicitly ruled out reparations to the descendants of slaves, Sanders has backed numerous policies to address the wealth gap, including a federal jobs guarantee and significant tax reform.

    Marianne Williamson, self-help author
    Position? In favour.

    What she has said: “I propose a $200bn-$500bn plan of reparations for slavery, the money to be disbursed over a period of 20 years. An esteemed council of African American leaders would determine the educational and economic projects to which the money would be given.”

    What she has proposed: The author and spiritualist is undoubtedly an outsider candidate and is the only one in the field to commit to a specific reparations program with defined financing. Experts say the amount is vastly below the figure that would be needed to repair the historic toll of slavery on black Americans.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/201 … candidates

    1. GA Anderson profile image92
      GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Elizabeth Warren is the one I have seen promoting it in her CNN Townhall and campaign stumps.

      This quote isn't the full context of her comment, but it isn't out of context either:

      ""So, I believe it's time to start the national full-blown conversation about reparations in this country," she said. "And that means I support the bill in the House to appoint a congressional panel of experts, people that are studying this and talk about different ways we may be able to do it and make a report back to Congress, so that we can as a nation do what's right and begin to heal."

      It appears that she is Credence2's top pick, so maybe we can get him to jump in here. He did claim to be black. ;-)

      GA

      1. IslandBites profile image87
        IslandBitesposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Thanks. I just read about that town hall.

        This is the bill, in case anyone is wondering.

        https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-con … ll/40/text

      2. gmwilliams profile image85
        gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Mr. Anderson, the proposal of reparations for slavery is totally asinine.  Slavery happened in the past.  It is time to let it go.  BTW, I am Black.  In my opinion, Black people have to stop having the victim mentality.  They have to become more proactive regarding their socioeconomic affairs.  They have to adopt a mentality of education, success, & achievement & stop viewing the government as their savior.  I see this behavior prevalent in Black Americans.  Black Caribbeans, on the other hand, have a can do, proactive mentality.  They don't believe in being victims; if they want something, they go after it.   They also imbue their children that nothing is or should be handled to you & that in order to succeed, one must obtain an education & work towards a goal.

      3. Credence2 profile image80
        Credence2posted 11 months agoin reply to this

        Yes, GA, you have baited me, and yes, I did claim to be black. Would send out a photo, but I am "wanted" in 51 states....

        In an earlier thread I gave my position and my disappointment with Senator Warren for advocating a political lead balloon of an idea.

        I will always say that there still was a grievous wrong committed by United States and its institutions toward Black people. Just as the grievous wrongs were committed against Native Americans how do you make reparations? Do you give the stolen land back? That will never happen as it is impractical now, such is the same with Afro-American reparations

        ------------------------------------------------------

        Dear Senator Warren, I have to call you out on what I consider to be the first major mistake in your campaign. Your pledge to address reparations for African-americans who were economically affected by the institution of Slavery is the wrong way to go. While, I will always believe that the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow and the interminable racism associated with those periods have a great deal to do  with why Black folks tend to be economically disadvantaged today, trying to explain that to white populations in general is like communicating with all those ‘heroes of the Confederacy’ statues that they all seem to revere so much.

        However, this latest proposal is politically unpalatable and divisive. I want you to destroy the hierarchal system that seems to advantage a few over the many. I want the money changers, the finance industry held to account for abuses. I want you to get the tentacles of the wealthy, the corporate class, their advocates and lobbyists out of Washington, curbing both their political and economic influence. I welcome the more involved “structural changes” that you propose to the way things have been done.


        This a battle between the have and have-not not one based on race, per se. No need to pander to me, I know what is at stake, economic and political racism and race based inequality is just a branch of the tree. Focus on cutting down the tree, and we have gone a long way in dealing with the branches. The idea of a revisit on the current policies is something that would appeal to most everyone, except the very wealthy. Trump made the promise of reining in the “elites”, he got the disaffected to buy into a promise that was nothing more than a lie, as he could do nothing to turn on his own class neither politically nor from and economic standpoint.

        I will work with my own folks to get them to recognize that many of our problems are just a subset of far greater ones. So, many will have to be enticed  away from the “Underground Railroad” sort of thinking and shown the “big picture” and how we need to ally with other economically disaffected groups for a cohesive Democrat party following and message. Making this a “Black Thang” is not going to help but will divide and give comfort to the real enemy allowing them to continue to gloat.

        1. Live to Learn profile image81
          Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Your last comment about 'the real enemy' makes it difficult to look at the whole in any way other than suspicion.

          No one is anyone's enemy. I would never support any policy or any party who degrades other American citizens in such a way.

          1. Credence2 profile image80
            Credence2posted 11 months agoin reply to this

            It is unfortunate, but I have to disagree with that assessment. I regard the people that I want Senator Warren to focus on bringing to heal as both an political and economic enemy. I am sorry that you are hung up on the word  with your interpretation of it.

            1. Live to Learn profile image81
              Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

              Enemy implies hate. I refuse to buy into emotion driven by hate.

              1. Credence2 profile image80
                Credence2posted 11 months agoin reply to this

                I use such terms when I play chess..

                1. Live to Learn profile image81
                  Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

                  I do that in Risk. But, that's a game.

        2. GA Anderson profile image92
          GA Andersonposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          Glad you popped in Cred. Your comment was as I expected. I agree with you.

          Even though I wasn't a Warren booster before, her repeated, (yes, the CNN Townhall wasn't her first "reparations" pronouncement), I am definitely a Warren criticizer now.

          It seems you and GMwilliams have similar views concerning the danger to blacks of the "reparations" mindset.

          GA

          1. Credence2 profile image80
            Credence2posted 11 months agoin reply to this

            It seems you and GMwilliams have similar views concerning the danger to blacks of the "reparations" mindset.

            Grace and ONLY agree on the fact that reparations for blacks is not a good idea. The how and why we came to this shared conclusion are from completely different perspectives.

  3. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
    Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months ago

    Meditate, people, and Be Here Now!

    The education/love of children is the cure. The ONLY cure.
    And who is best suited for that? The parents, the families, the communities.

    BE HERE NOW. Its a spiritual matter, not a political matter. neutral

  4. StevenHall4646 profile image81
    StevenHall4646posted 11 months ago

    Who would pay for this? Would a homeless white man have to pay reparations to Lebron James? Why are Jewish people, a group that was close to extinction/genocide less than 100 years ago is one of the most successful races in America? Is it because they're a victim or is it because their values and culture encourage hard work?

    1. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
      Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      (The latter, but that is besides the point, apparently.)

      History of the Descendants of Slavery

      "1619 - Some of the first African slaves are purchased in Virginia by English colonists, though slaves had been used by European colonists long before.
      1788 - The US constitution is ratified; under it, slaves are considered by law to be three-fifths of a person. (Their votes counted as such.)
      1808 - President Thomas Jefferson officially ends the African slave trade, but domestic slave trade, particularly in the southern states, begins to grow.
      1822 - Freed African-Americans found Liberia in West Africa as a new home for freed slaves.
      1860 - Abraham Lincoln becomes president of the US; the southern states secede and the Civil War begins the following year.
      1862 - President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation frees all slaves in the seceded states.
      1865 - The South loses the war; the 13th Amendment to the Constitution formally abolishes slavery.
      1868 - The 14th Amendment grants freed African Americans citizenship.
      1870 - The 15th Amendment gives African American men the right to vote;"(Now their vote counts fully.)
      The South begins passing segregation laws."

      Perhaps this is where things began to go wrong: The two cultures could not understand each other. The whites could not help the blacks. The blacks and the whites could not see eye to eye and could not get along.
       
      Its a sad thing when we can't crack off layers of hardness from our human hearts.
      But crack away we must.

      I do not think giving money to the endless amount of descendants of those who were sold as slaves in Africa is the way to help those who are still having trouble in this modern day. We need to ask these descendants of slavery why they are still having trouble. Why can't they find ways to help themselves and each other toward success and prosperity? Would they accept the help of whites/non-blacks? If so, what sort of help? They need to admit their difficulties, isolate them and then work on them in a concrete way.

      Would federal funding for good pre-schools in their neighborhoods help? That might be one solution.

      1. Kathryn L Hill profile image80
        Kathryn L Hillposted 11 months agoin reply to this

        And we HAVE tried to help them. Apparently, none of the programs we whites and we blacks and we politicians and we public servants have come up with have helped the desendants of the slaves.

        Really? is that true? Now they need cold hard cash?

        Well, so do the Naive American / Indigenous Indians.

        Where are we going to get all this money? yikes

        1. Live to Learn profile image81
          Live to Learnposted 11 months agoin reply to this

          I think that's the point. You can't use money to make up for events long past. Money is not going to change any minds of any people alive today. Money is not going to do anything to alleviate a victim mentality. It will only exacerbate it.

          If I hated an entire group of people because of something that happened prior to my birth by people who looked similar, handing me money or benefits would not change that hatred.

          I think I'd hate them more because I'd be insulted by their reaction to the action. They'd think they had done something good. I'd see the act as proof they were just like those they look like from long ago and were trying to buy their way out of guilt.

          I think, if you want to keep an entire class of people down you tell them they aren't responsible, they are owed something, tell them to feel sorry for themselves and then let it fester through a few generations.

          Collectively, we live better than any generation that came before us. Americans live better than most of the rest of the world. We are greedy, top to bottom. I have no sympathy for greed at the top of the economic ladder and little for middle or bottom.

          If you are able bodied and of sound of mind you should be able to be responsible. If you are handicapped by low intellect or some physical challenge, I'm happy to help.

          1. gmwilliams profile image85
            gmwilliamsposted 11 months agoin reply to this

            Agree wholeheartedly!!!!

 
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