How would YOU describe the current social climate in America?

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  1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
    Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks ago

    In as much detail as possible, comparing real life and our digital lives, describe the current social climate in America. Feel free to include any supporting opinions, but only opinions. I am only seeking anecdotal evidence from YOUR perspective, not factual or anecdotal evidence from some article another individual posted.

    1. Credence2 profile image80
      Credence2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      I would have to write you a veritable term paper, Kyler, to properly address your question. Could you be more specific?

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
        Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        No, that is what I'm looking for if that is what you feel is necessary. If you would like to focus only on a single aspect of the social climate that is upon you as well. If I were to answer the question, which I will at some point in the future, I would answer it with careful attention paid to the effects of social media and the comparative cowardice of those posting when observing their real-life interactions.

    2. Credence2 profile image80
      Credence2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      What I have noticed is a greater animosity among us as the communications revolution allow more of us to interchange with others who we would normally not to see nor associate with in the real world.

      Now, in social media, being faceless and nameless has allowed many to discard the civility and decorum that would normally be a part of person to person communication or even telephone conversation between opposing sides of the political divide.

      1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
        Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Would you be willing to expand upon the concept "a greater animosity among us as the communications revolution allow more of us to interchange with others who we would normally not to see nor associate with in the real world" with a keen sense of detail as it concerns the long-term damage it may cause?

        Many people I meet hold the same sentiment, yet when I ask them to expand upon this notion they tend to focus on short-term and don't really have the capacity to weigh in on the effects they think it will have in the long-term.

        1. Credence2 profile image80
          Credence2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          Perhaps, it is difficult to speculate where my observation will lead in the long term. Could it reduce inhibitions, making it more likely that angry folks will get physical and bring violence into the real world?

          All you have to do is go to any story found in Yahoo and see the verbal attacks, expletives thrown around in a way that one would not dare in a face to face scenario. If it wasn't for conduct rules this forum would probably be a lot less civil.

          Let me know if I can add anything else.

          1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
            Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            Let's expand further on the same topic. Bringing violence into the real world due to online interaction is actually something I have experienced for myself. You've listed the symptom, which is always vague and of little substance, what I am looking for is the mechanisms for that symptom and the subsequent outcomes from your perspective.

            What do you feel, going forward, will be the evolution of the mechanism for such violence? As of now it is social media, the animosity interacting with others we wouldn't otherwise creating animosity; how do you see that evolving?

            For me I'm already beginning to see blatant classism becoming a mechanism and a symptom as higher classes are forced to interact with the lower.

            1. Credence2 profile image80
              Credence2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              Without being partisan, look at the behavior of people at Trump rallies, pugnacious ready to be challenged to do mayhem on the slightest provocation? Some of the Sanders crowd could be following in that behavior. Anger supercedes reasonableness. It may be reflected by firearms, people obtaining side arms and permits in fear of confrontation.

              When I read of the tale of the man who carried his 9mm into the supermarket, I see an exaggerated fear of confrontation or challenge while he himself may be be the catalyst for violence.

              People are now on the edge and consequently are unpredictable.

              1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
                Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                Discussing firearms is a rickety bridge, as a weapon owner myself it can be a very touchy subject to hit upon. Especially when you can get flagged online for certain mentalities you discuss as figurative or hypothetical. I'll take what you have said here into account, thank you, and if you have anything further you'd like to add I'd love to read it over and perhaps ask further questions.

                1. Credence2 profile image80
                  Credence2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  We have had firearms here since the founding of the republic. I guess now, it is the motivation to own and get a permit. So it is not about "guns", what is the reason why one believes that one needs one if you cannot identify bonifide self defense issues? This is just one mechanism that makes itself evident in an ever more defensive society which can be a direct outcome of fear or anger.

                  1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
                    Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    I see where you are coming from as far as people getting weapons for what would be best described with the current misnomer as, "boogaloo," but that is rarely the true motivation for buying a weapon; though most of the people who buy weapons for that purpose could be equated to the ones causing serious issues both online and in real life as far as the social climate is concerned I don't think they could accurately be called the majority, nor could I see them as becoming a majority in the future personally.

                    I just don't want this topic to change from the focus being social climate, to how gun rights are affected by the social climate. If we expand any further on this gun topic then I feel we'd be losing the point. I mean all this basically makes me want to go into the statistics of illegally obtained weapons being used in crimes vs. legal gun owners, the amount of weapons actually owned by what percentage vs. the amount of illegal weapons confiscated, ugh I just don't think the data supports that stance as an ongoing majority issue or one that will leave the marginal statistics zone.

                    Something to ponder, definitely, but I don't think we will see a dramatic increase in legal gun owners committing violent acts in unwarranted cases of self-defense.

  2. wilderness profile image95
    wildernessposted 5 weeks ago

    Fragmentation.  Our society is fragmenting badly.

    We seem to all require that we are part of a group, or more likely several groups.  It may be sex, it might be political orientation, race, income/wealth or any of hundreds of other groups, but we all demand that we belong to something other than the United States.

    I saw this in the 90's and had nearly lost hope in our country...until 911, when we came together as people of America.  Perhaps it will happen again.

    As far as digital vs real - the digital age has allowed us to express ourselves anonymously and we do so with a vengeance.  No need for truth - just say what it takes to denigrate any group not our own.  It has succeeded in growing the fragmentation to a far greater amount than we've ever seen in the past.

    1. Kyler J Falk profile image85
      Kyler J Falkposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      A very clear and concise response, wilderness, thank you. I tend to agree with your sentiments as well.

 
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