Transgender athletes and fairness

Jump to Last Post 1-5 of 5 discussions (45 posts)
  1. Valeant profile image86
    Valeantposted 2 years ago

    It appears that this issue is gaining traction with a pair of stories from today.  What are your thoughts on transgender athletes and sports?

    South Dakota bans transgender athletes from competing in women's sports:
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/south-dakota … 50773.html

    Penn athlete that moved from men's team to women's team now breaking records:
    https://www.yahoo.com/sports/16-penn-sw … 18436.html

    1. Castlepaloma profile image75
      Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      There was a transgender in Canada's gold metal football last Olympic. Can you imagine If they let men into women sports like by transgender way.  It would completely dominant both men and women sports, seem fair. lol

    2. jwashington profile image61
      jwashingtonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      In my opinion it's not a gender thing. It's a sex thing. They're going by body athletic ability not who you are by gender. It's the same with letting women in the navy seals. So far I know it's just men. It's not a gender thing.

      I'm not familiar with sports but I'd see no issue with mixed sex swimmers but some sports it would be a disadvantage for a female (regardless her gender identity) to play with men twice her strength.

      I guess it depends on the sport.

      I see no other objection than the biological aspect of it and whether organizations will let people join based on ability regardless the sex. I don't know.

      1. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Looking down the list of men and women's world records in swimming, the men are always quicker than women. 

        One might think that some things like figure skating it wouldn't matter but it does.  Women cannot perform the most difficult jumps and spins men do.  Same for snowboarding on the half pipe or downhill racing.  (I've been watching the Olympics.)

        There is a very good reason that males don't compete against females, regardless of perceived gender, in physical sports.

        1. jwashington profile image61
          jwashingtonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Figure skating I don't see the problem. For example, Surya Bonaly did her first black flip at the 1994 Olympics. Swimming, it sounds more like the training style would need to change a bit to balance things since there's no strength differences involved. Maybe height would be the problem but that would be for both men and women.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image75
            Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            The main reason women can not complete in sports with men. Is Men are 20% larger in mass size and in
            Testosterone . which has many factors involved in the development of muscle bulk and strength. Testosterone increases neurotransmitters, which encourage tissue growth. It also interacts with nuclear receptors in DNA, which causes protein synthesis. Testosterone increases levels of growth hormone. That makes exercise more likely to build muscle.

            Testosterone increases bone density and tells the bone marrow to manufacture red blood cells. Men
            Testosterone also plays a role in fat metabolism, helping men to burn fat more efficiently.

            One won't find a sport that woman dominant over men. Yet may find the odd sport with more skill set like horse jumping sports or flying an aircraft where women  can complete well in.

          2. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            If that were true we would see the same results from men and women, but we don't.  Not in swimming, not in figure skating - commentators made a huge deal of a woman being the first to ever complete a quad spin, something that men do in every performance.  Same for swimming; the top men always outperform the top women in terms of speed and tricks.  Simple strength plays a huge part in both swimming and skating, although it might not look like it.

      2. Castlepaloma profile image75
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        100m freestyle, is the standard for swimming. The fastest swimming female at the Olympic time is 51.96. The slowest men swimmers of 8 finalist is 48.10. A time 3.80 second slower time means hundreds of women would not ever be able to complete with men in the finals 100m swim.
        Much is the same across the board except with horses or combined of equal mix sex sports competition.
        I had multi Metalist Olympic girlfriend . She couldn't beat me in swimming.

        1. jwashington profile image61
          jwashingtonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Is it a height difference? How is training for men and women different in swimming?

          1. wilderness profile image94
            wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            No, it is not (primarily) height difference.  Mostly it is strength; if you can pull your arms through the water faster you will go faster, and that pull requires strength.

    3. Ken Burgess profile image76
      Ken Burgessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I think it is fabulous, this is the equality we have been looking and hoping for.

      Everyone should be able to compete in whatever sport they want, as whatever sex they want to identify as, regardless of what others may think.

      This is a progression of the advances we have seen in the military for instance, where we modified training curriculum and minimum standards even in Special Forces units so that anyone, regardless of sex, can make the cut.

      To want to see otherwise is an opinion, an outlook, mired in patriarchy and sexist views.  There are no differences in the sexes, there should be no consideration based on sex, they should do away with "women" sports all together and just have sports.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image75
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Don't want my daughter joining the military and getting herself killed easily by man with a greater killer instinct and physical strength Besides a kill by soldier is usually murder in a uniform.

        If women can make the cut in anything they do, I'm for it. Actually trained a woman who tied with me in the most world sandsculpture championships in it's history. To me, that's a greater accomplishment than mine.

        Men  in women's sports, is a different story.

      2. wilderness profile image94
        wildernessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        I took a women's golf class in college - does that count?

        Special case - couldn't fit it in anywhere else and knew the instructor well.  Didn't even have to claim transgender.  But beginning golf had to competition - does that ruin it all?

        1. Castlepaloma profile image75
          Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I think hiking is more of a sport than golf, yet they do have it in the Olympics

  2. Valeant profile image86
    Valeantposted 2 years ago

    Having family that is in the trans community, I am sympathetic.  But then I am also realistic that physically those born male will have a huge competitive advantage over women on many occasions.  I do not think those that choose to transition should be able to compete for their new gender when it goes male to female.

    1. Castlepaloma profile image75
      Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      In Canada all I have to do is convince my Doctor that i feel like female and then change my ID to a female

      Back then, could one imagine If I change to female swimming then totally dominant the  Olympics.Then watched how angry most women would be.
      Then add more to blowing their tops by telling them, don't be lazy, try harder.

  3. Credence2 profile image77
    Credence2posted 2 years ago

    Not wanting to appear as a mastodon.......

    There is a reason for the fact that men and women compete separately as there are physical differences between the sexes that generally give men the advantage in compitition areas that focused on strength.

    Help me with transgender concept?

    If a person born a man, where is the justification that he does not take unfair advantage competing with women in sports, regardless of his gender identity?

    1. Ken Burgess profile image76
      Ken Burgessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      This is malarky.  This is Patriarchy and sexism in full bloom.

      Standards must be equal... be it a science test or a fitness test or sports.

      You are good enough to be the best or find another course in life to pursue.

      Do you know why women's soccer and women's basketball only gets a tiny fraction of attention that men's sports do? 

      Because we ALL know they aren't the best, these women couldn't make a man's team at the pro level. If they could, they would.

      Until they do away with such shams, such flagrant disregard for equality, all the transgenders and all those that identify as women should be allowed to compete in anything they want... equal is equal.

      As for the military:

      WITH EQUAL OPPORTUNITY COMES EQUAL RESPONSIBILITY:
      Kristen M. Griest | 02.25.21

      As the Army’s first female infantry officer, I have long awaited the elimination of a gender-based fitness test. The drastically lower female standards of the old Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) not only jeopardized mission readiness in combat units but also reinforced the false notion that women are categorically incapable of performing the same job as men. The new Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) promised to alleviate these issues by finally assessing women on the same fitness scale as men and setting minimum physical standards based on branch requirements rather than gender.

      However, these gender-neutral standards have recently garnered criticism. Due to an initial ACFT fail rate of 54 percent among women, activist groups have raised concerns that the test will disadvantage female servicemembers. As such, lawmakers directed the Army to halt implementation of the ACFT until the service can prove it will not negatively impact the recruitment and retention of soldiers in critical support jobs, particularly those with large female populations. To address this concern, the Army is considering reverting to gender-based fitness scoring for promotion and reducing the minimum standards for combat arms. Based on my experience, I feel compelled to share how this potential reversal in policy will negatively impact both combat arms branches and the women who serve in them.

      First, reverting to gender-based scoring could drastically reduce the performance and effectiveness of combat arms units. Specifically, without a separate, minimum standard for combat arms, the requirements to join the nation’s combat forces could soon be as low as performing ten push-ups in two minutes, running two miles in twenty-one minutes, deadlifting 140 pounds three times, and performing only one repetition of a leg tuck or, failing that, two minutes of a plank exercise. Proponents of this ACFT standard will undoubtedly claim that it is an appropriate predictor of success for combat arms soldiers; as a recent infantry company commander, I can promise you it is not. While these low standards may have seemed adequate in a controlled study, I know from experience that they will not suffice in reality.

      Indeed, the presence of just a handful of individuals who cannot run two miles faster than twenty-one minutes has the potential to derail a training exercise, not to mention an actual combat patrol. Entire companies of 130 soldiers will be forced to frequently halt operations in order to medically evacuate the ill-prepared as they succumb to fatigue and injury. Missions will be delayed and other soldiers will be overburdened with the weight of their unfit teammates’ equipment. This scenario is inconvenient and bad for morale during a training exercise; in combat it could be deadly. Instead of addressing the issue of having some soldiers insufficiently prepared for the physical rigors of combat, which sparked the APFT’s revision in the first place, a gender-based ACFT in combat arms will normalize it and make it unmanageable. It is wholly unethical to allow the standards of the nation’s premiere fighting units to degrade so badly, just to accommodate the lowest-performing soldiers (women).

      Reverting to gender-based scoring and reducing the minimum standard for combat arms will also hurt the women in those branches. Under a gender-based system, women in combat arms have to fight every day to dispel the notion that their presence inherently weakens these previously all-male units [it does]. Lower female standards also reinforce the belief that women cannot perform the same job as men, therefore making it difficult for women to earn the trust and confidence of their teammates. The original ACFT promised some respite from these perceptions, but a reversion to gender-based scoring threatens to validate them. While it may be difficult for a 120-pound woman to lift or drag 250 pounds, the Army cannot artificially absolve women of that responsibility;  it may still exist on the battlefield. The entire purpose of creating a gender-neutral test was to acknowledge the reality that each job has objective physical standards to which all soldiers should be held, regardless of gender. The intent was not to ensure that women and men will have an equal likelihood of meeting those standards. Rather, it is incumbent upon women who volunteer for the combat arms profession to ensure they are fully capable and qualified for it. To not require women to meet equal standards in combat arms will not only undermine their credibility, but also place those women, their teammates, and the mission at risk.

      Critics might suggest this opinion makes me uncaring about equity or unsympathetic to women, but nothing could be further from the truth. Rather, it is because I have failed almost every first attempt at a military task—from applying to West Point to graduating Ranger School—that I know first contact with failure is not a cause for concern. Similarly, an initially high collective failure rate among women on the ACFT is not indicative of their future potential to succeed, especially when this failure is largely due to an inability to perform just one repetition of one exercise. In fact, my latest first-attempt failure was on a practice ACFT. Although I trained diligently to raise my 180-pound maximum deadlift to 265 pounds over several months, I realized I should have spent similar effort on the standing power throw event. Having never thrown a ten-pound medicine ball backward over my head, I missed the minimum distance for the infantry by 1.5 meters. However, after six weeks of dedicated effort, I was able to meet the standard and I am motivated to further improve. I know other women feel this same motivation, as their posts on social media proudly display their ability to meet ACFT benchmarks they previously thought unattainable. One women’s ACFT Facebook page has amassed over forty-five thousand members who inspire, advise, and encourage each other to improve their physical skills. Instead of stymieing this groundswell of motivation and perseverance among women by reverting to gender-based testing, policymakers should foster their potential with high expectations.

      Overall, there is little doubt that the gender-neutral ACFT is a more appropriate measure of combat-related fitness than the APFT. While the equity question must be addressed, the answer is not to implement gender-based scoring or reduce the minimum standards for combat arms. Doing so would have both immediate and insidious impacts on combat effectiveness, as well as on women’s credibility and potential. The final version of the ACFT should hold men and women in combat arms to equal branch-based minimum standards. Failing to do so will further marginalize women in these units rather than protect them and will hurt the Army rather than prepare it.

      Capt. Kristen M. Griest was one of the first two women to graduate from Ranger School and she became the Army’s first female infantry officer in 2016. [It should be noted she benefited from lower female standards of the old Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and a command that practically ordered those running Ranger School to get a woman graduate through].

      1. Castlepaloma profile image75
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        https://youtu.be/n9zwjse91uY

        Dr. Petterson address this transexual topic well. A law pass one must remember 30 different gender names or can loose their career like Petterson did at his Studies at the University of Toronto. its more about free speech than about gender. Personal for me I don't understand gender, vaccines, religion or politics, military and greed world's . So I try to stay away as much as possible . Because from these very conflicting worlds of division is for ever ending non solutions. It's a centralist tactic to label everyone and have them conflict with each other in divide and conquer take over.

      2. Credence2 profile image77
        Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

        1. Standards are determined to be relevant requirement for the job one is applying for and not merely arbitrary.

        Those standards, once accurately determined to correlate to successful job performance is applied universally.

        Based on fixed standard there may be fewer women than men who could drag 250 pounds as a potential firefighter, but we don't screen them out because they are women, but because they can't meet the a critical standard shown to be relevant to job performance.


        With this, I agree:
        -----------
        While it may be difficult for a 120-pound woman to lift or drag 250 pounds, the Army cannot artificially absolve women of that responsibility;  it may still exist on the battlefield. The entire purpose of creating a gender-neutral test was to acknowledge the reality that each job has objective physical standards to which all soldiers should be held, regardless of gender. The intent was not to ensure that women and men will have an equal likelihood of meeting those standArcs

        -------------------

  4. SmartAndFun profile image95
    SmartAndFunposted 2 years ago

    Go to this website, https://boysvswomen.com/#/ , scroll down to the swimming category and you will see that the best high school boys' times beat the top Women's times from the 2016 Olympics. There are other sports listed there as well.

    High school boys can beat top female Olympians.

    It's not fair to allow males in female sports and it tells women and girls that men and boys  matter more than girls and women.

    EDIT: there's also the issue of Lia Thomas allowing his penis to be visible to his female teammates in the women's locker room. No woman should have to put up with male exhibitionism in a female-only locker room.


    https://hubstatic.com/15888372.jpg

    1. Castlepaloma profile image75
      Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Not ever stand beside a naked man.

      1. SmartAndFun profile image95
        SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        ??

        1. Castlepaloma profile image75
          Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          You know, a naked man in a women's locker room.

          1. SmartAndFun profile image95
            SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Yep, that's a problem for the female athletes on the UPenn swim team. They shouldn't have deal deal with that in the women's locker room, on top of the fiarness issue. Yet NCAA endorses it.

            1. Ken Burgess profile image76
              Ken Burgessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

              That's correct, because in order to have true equality, they have to do away with Women's & Men's sports.

              Until they do away with different standards for women, be it in sports, in the military, for firefighters or any other work there will be no equality.

              There are two options... admit women don't belong in Combat Arms, playing Football, or being Firefighters... or continue to support the lie, by allowing standards to be lowered for women who could not otherwise do the job.

              Or choice three... do away with different standards and 'womens' sports.  If only one fraction of one percent of women can do those jobs and compete in those sports as well as men, so be it.  That is Equality.

              You are either Equal... or you aren't.

              1. Valeant profile image86
                Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                No one in sports is equal to start with.  Some players are better than others, some teams are better than others.  No one is striving for equality.  But it's clear in sport that those born male have too-great of advantages when allowed to compete post-transition.

                There are plenty of sports where the women's version is more popular and enjoyable to watch than the men's version.  Volleyball and gymnastics are the two obvious ones.  You could also make the case that the US women's soccer team is more popular than the men's.

                1. Ken Burgess profile image76
                  Ken Burgessposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  Such opinion just reeks of patriarchy and sexism.

                  Including the sports you pick that you say are "more popular"... I can imagine why you believe so, because they wear scant/revealing "uniforms".

                  Women will never reach equality on any level so long as such perspectives as yours are allowed to exist.

                  1. Castlepaloma profile image75
                    Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-56960011

                    Caitlyn Jenner opposes trans girls in women's sports as unfair

                  2. Valeant profile image86
                    Valeantposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    Noting a popularity difference between three gendered sports (way to leave out the soccer reference by the way to make a very uneducated guess) is just factual.

                    That you would bring up 'uniforms' says way more about where your own mind took this conversation and the sexism you have.  I've played high-level volleyball for over 30 years and I can assure you that the women's game is more enjoyable because the rallies are longer and there's more opportunity on the women's side at both the high school and collegiate levels, hence the increase in popularity. 

                    If you're going to fabricate a dig at me like that, at least do some simple research like visiting my profile to see the dozens of articles I've posted about that sport so you sound less like an idiot.

                2. SmartAndFun profile image95
                  SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                  I agree with Valeant that no two athletes are equal to start with and that no one is striving for equality among male and female athletes.

                  A separate female category in sports is designated to give females an even playing field among other females.

                  Male athletics divisions are for determining and celebrating the best male athletes, female divisions are for determining and celebrating the best female athletes.

                  1. tsmog profile image84
                    tsmogposted 2 years agoin reply to this

                    Amen!

    2. Credence2 profile image77
      Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

      You seem to know a bit about all of this. Why do you think that women consistently and universally live longer than men? Check out the list of  supercentenarians

      While the men are stronger, I would much rather have the advantage of the women. Do you have another set of nice graphics that can show us this?

      1. SmartAndFun profile image95
        SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        Sorry, no graphic on that. This thread is discussing male advantage in athletics. That's the topic I'm here for.

      2. Castlepaloma profile image75
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        That is one way to cheat time, men switch over to women.

        1. Credence2 profile image77
          Credence2posted 2 years agoin reply to this

          Who knows, that might well be the 'next big thing'.

  5. Readmikenow profile image93
    Readmikenowposted 2 years ago

    I do have transgendered people in my family.

    I think it is a sad situation.  I've told the person in my family they are not a female and their response it "I know."  I then ask, "Why do you do this?"  I'm then bombarded with a series of gender vs sex identification arguments.  I can't tell you the number of crazy scientific studies I've been emailed.  It all sounds so crazy to me.

    I've come to the conclusion the only thing that we can do for this person is to love them no matter what.

    My conclusion?  A man cannot become a female and a female cannot become a male.
    The only thing they can do is either surgically or chemically alter their bodies and then dress in a way to provide an illusion of being the opposite sex.  This is a fact.

    Cue the outrage.

    Many "biological" women have expressed their outrage at transgendered women getting records for "females" when they are indeed males.  Many women were angry that a recent jeopardy transgendered female has a record for the highest scoring "female."  I think biological women have a legitimate complaint.

    It's the same in sports.

    A transgendered woman is not a woman.  It is a male who has chemically or surgically altered their body and dresses in a way to provide the illusion they are female.  Simply take a sample of a person's DNA and learn what the results tell you. This is their genetic code.

    This should determine if a person should compete as a male or female in sports.

    1. SmartAndFun profile image95
      SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      I agree. I feel empathy for people who wish to be the opposite sex, but the reailty is that they cannot become the opposite sex. They may prefer to live their fantasy but the rest of us should not be made to go along with it.

      There are even males in women's prisons now. Some of these males are sex offenders. Can you imagine being a woman and being locked up 24/7 with a male rapist? It's bone chilling.

      1. Castlepaloma profile image75
        Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        In my next lifetime, I want to be a lesbian.

        Is that a sexiest thought crime?

      2. Readmikenow profile image93
        Readmikenowposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        You are right.  Unfortunately, it is a reality in today's world.

      3. jwashington profile image61
        jwashingtonposted 2 years agoin reply to this

        The thing is they're not trying to become the opposite sex. It's a medical thing (speaking of genes, hormones, etc and psychology). Everyone has different personality treats and not all want to or can alter their body to match their gender.

        The best I can describe it (from talking to transgender) is like being born without a limb. You have a feeling something is supposed to be there as with majority of how people are born but there isn't. Then you decide to wear a prosthetic arm. No one says you're wrong. Unusually maybe but not wrong.

        Despite the stereotypes and terminology both new and old it's really not trying to make themselves the opposite sex.

        Unless you are defining who people are by what's between their legs?

        But with sports I don't see it a gender thing. That's the problem. Wanting to play with the opposite sex (not gender) because of ones gender. I don't feel it works that way. I feel it's taboo to change ones physical body to match what one physiologically feels. But does it being taboo mean it's wrong

        It took me awhile to understand it.

        1. SmartAndFun profile image95
          SmartAndFunposted 2 years agoin reply to this

          I think you and agree on most points. I don't think it is wrong if adults want to undergo medical treatments to make themselves look different. But a male who undergoes hormone therapy or surgeries to appear female is still a male. While some transgender males recognize that they remain male and always will, others insist they are female and always have been female, and that they must be treated as female in all aspects of life and law (allowed in female sports and female prisons, for example).

          It's a problem for females when government/law allows gender identity to trump or replace sex, or be on equal footing with sex. There is a mantra, "trans women are women," which is being pushed by some people and organizations in the name of human rights. While most people want everyone to be treated with dignity and kindness, as all should be, the "trans women are women" mantra is dangerous when taken at face value and written into law, because it means any male who declares himself to be female must be treated as female in female sports, prisons, locker rooms, etc.

          For example, the US Equality Act aims to outlaw discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation and gender identity. But the issue is murkey, for example, when a female athlete says she is being discriminated against basde on her sex, when males are allowed on female-only competitions. But when the male transgender athlete is prohibited from competing in female sports, says this is discrimination based on gender identity. So which one is it? Discrimination based on sex or discrimination based on gender identity? It is both but the two are at odds with one another. A court can't rule in favor of both of them because one cancels out the other.

          My opinion is that we should let people get whatever medical treatments they want, treat them with kindness and dignity, but not allow them to be classified as the opposite sex in the eyes of the law.

          1. Castlepaloma profile image75
            Castlepalomaposted 2 years agoin reply to this

            Don't want my tax dollars to be paying for very expensive sex change operations. I'm for transgender and supported  for gay sex when it was illegal on up to the mid 70s

 
working

This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://corp.maven.io/privacy-policy

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)