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New health care bill will increase costs:

  1. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I thought this article was interesting, especially since it appeared in the NYT. According to this guru, costs will INCREASE, not decrease. This is the same guru that democrats hailed as wonderful when he challenged Bush. Don't worry, though, costs will increase by only a few billion, and what's a few billion bucks here or there?

    I'm not saying that the extra cost won't be worth it to insure more people. The point is that conservatives were right when they said it would be impossible to cover more people and reduce costs at the same time, while democrats insisted it could be done with the HC law.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/24/healt … th.html?hp

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
      Ralph Deedsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The article in the NYT didn't exactly say that that the actuary's report said the health care reform bill will increase costs but rather that the program "will  not slow the overall growth of health spending" and that costs will continue to increase. This is a significant difference.

      "A government analysis of the new health care law says it will not slow the overall growth of health spending because the expansion of insurance and services to 34 million people will offset cost reductions in Medicare and other programs."

  2. profile image0
    LegendaryHeroposted 7 years ago

    Not surprising at all.

    Anything the government touches increases in costs.

    Thanks for sharing.

  3. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I'm not surprised, but I am a little surprised it appeared in the NYT!

  4. ledefensetech profile image69
    ledefensetechposted 7 years ago

    Sooner or later even the NYT has to admit reality.  Unless they get their government bailout, they still have to print news so people will buy their (substandard) newspaper.

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image70
      Ralph Deedsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      The New York Times is the preeminent U.S. newspaper. It's the newspaper of record. Can you name one that's better and more comprehensive on general news, politics, business, economics and finance, international news, sports and the arts. That doesn't mean that they are always right and that they don't have biases. But they are right more often than not and objective in their reporting. It's true that the Times is hurting as are many newspapers around the world.

      1. Doug Hughes profile image60
        Doug Hughesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        I read the article. It says that costs in hte decade to 2019 will be up 9-tenths of a percent ovr what they would have been without the law. The article also estimates that 34 million Americans will have coverage who would not have had it.

        For the sake of agrument make it 1 percent increase, and estimate 34 million Americans at 10% of the population. So what the article suggests is that we will provide medical care for 10% of the population at a net increase in cost of 1%. And this is a bad deal?

  5. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    Doug, re-read my initial post. I didn't say this was a bad deal in order to cover more people. It rather boggles the mind, though, when we consider a couple of billion to be a pittance.

    1. Doug Hughes profile image60
      Doug Hughesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      I know you didn't and I wasn't snarking at you, Rose.

      I was trying to put some scale to the claim, comparing the size of the benefit to the size of the cost.

    2. Ralph Deeds profile image70
      Ralph Deedsposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Take a look at these costs:

      http://costofwar.com/

  6. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    Sorry, thought you were!

    Your pal,

    Rose

    1. Doug Hughes profile image60
      Doug Hughesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Mea Culpa

  7. susanlang profile image58
    susanlangposted 7 years ago

    This is what the White House Director Of Health Care Reform had to say. What do you think?
     
    "Good afternoon,

    Since the House of Representatives voted to pass health reform legislation on Sunday night, the legislative process and its political impact have been the focus of all the newspapers and cable TV pundits.

    Outside of DC, however, many Americans are trying to cut through the chatter and get to the substance of reform with a simple question: "What does health insurance reform actually mean for me?" To help, we've put together a list of some key benefits every American should know.

    Let's start with how health insurance reform will expand and strengthen coverage:

    This year, children with pre-existing conditions can no longer be denied health insurance coverage. Once the new health insurance exchanges begin in the coming years, pre-existing condition discrimination will become a thing of the past for everyone.
    This year, health care plans will allow young people to remain on their parents' insurance policy up until their 26th birthday.
    This year, insurance companies will be banned from dropping people from coverage when they get sick, and they will be banned from implementing lifetime caps on coverage. This year, restrictive annual limits on coverage will be banned for certain plans. Under health insurance reform, Americans will be ensured access to the care they need.
    This year, adults who are uninsured because of pre-existing conditions will have access to affordable insurance through a temporary subsidized high-risk pool.
    In the next fiscal year, the bill increases funding for community health centers, so they can treat nearly double the number of patients over the next five years.
    This year, we'll also establish an independent commission to advise on how best to build the health care workforce and increase the number of nurses, doctors and other professionals to meet our country's needs.  Going forward, we will provide $1.5 billion in funding to support the next generation of doctors, nurses and other primary care practitioners -- on top of a $500 million investment from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    Health insurance reform will also curb some of the worst insurance industry practices and strengthen consumer protections:

    This year, this bill creates a new, independent appeals process that ensures consumers in new private plans have access to an effective process to appeal decisions made by their insurer.
    This year, discrimination based on salary will be outlawed. New group health plans will be prohibited from establishing any eligibility rules for health care coverage that discriminate in favor of higher-wage employees.
    Beginning this fiscal year, this bill provides funding to states to help establish offices of health insurance consumer assistance in order to help individuals in the process of filing complaints or appeals against insurance companies.
    Starting January 1, 2011, insurers in the individual and small group market will be required to spend 80 percent of their premium dollars on medical services. Insurers in the large group market will be required to spend 85 percent of their premium dollars on medical services. Any insurers who don't meet those thresholds will be required to provide rebates to their policyholders.
    Starting in 2011, this bill helps states require insurance companies to submit justification for requested premium increases. Any company with excessive or unjustified premium increases may not be able to participate in the new health insurance exchanges.
    Reform immediately begins to lower health care costs for American families and small businesses:

    This year, small businesses that choose to offer coverage will begin to receive tax credits of up to 35 percent of premiums to help make employee coverage more affordable.
    This year, new private plans will be required to provide free preventive care: no co-payments and no deductibles for preventive services. And beginning January 1, 2011, Medicare will do the same.
    This year, this bill will provide help for early retirees by creating a temporary re-insurance program to help offset the costs of expensive premiums for employers and retirees age 55-64.
    This year, this bill starts to close the Medicare Part D 'donut hole' by providing a $250 rebate to Medicare beneficiaries who hit the gap in prescription drug coverage. And beginning in 2011, the bill institutes a 50% discount on prescription drugs in the 'donut hole.'
    Thank you",

    Nancy-Ann DeParle
    Director, White House Office of Health Reform

  8. habee profile image91
    habeeposted 7 years ago

    I really like the idea of free preventive care!

  9. MikeNV profile image69
    MikeNVposted 7 years ago

    Please list the Government proposals that have EVER come in at or under budget projections.

    1. livelonger profile image88
      livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, let's start with the Iraq War!

    2. Evan G Rogers profile image79
      Evan G Rogersposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Anyone who thinks that forcing everyone in the country to have insurance is at all consistent with keeping costs even... is a fool.

      If demand increases by 34 million people, how can prices NOT increase?

      1. livelonger profile image88
        livelongerposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        How is it that every other developed country manages to cover all of their citizens (by forcing them to all pay in), at significantly lower cost than we do, and with better health outcomes?

        1. Doug Hughes profile image60
          Doug Hughesposted 7 years ago in reply to this

          "f demand increases by 34 million people, how can prices NOT increase?"

          A lot of businesses will tell you that a 10% increase in business can result in LOWER prices.

 
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