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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (14 posts)

Ought Oh... Bad News for Al Gore

  1. MikeNV profile image79
    MikeNVposted 8 years ago

    How is Gore going to profit from this?

    "Michael Lockwood, a professor of space environment physics at the University of Reading in England, may already have identified one response: the unusually frigid European winter of 2009-10. He has studied records back to 1650 and found that severe European winters are much more likely during periods of low solar activity. This fits an idea of solar activity's giving rise to small changes in the global climate overall but large regional effects."

    What's that it was unusually cold in Europe last year?  Siberia had it's coldest winter in the past 30 years?  Huh?

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co … 4.html?g=0

    Happy reading... turns out there is this giant glowing orb in the sky that determines our fate... but people choose to ignore this fact and take it for granted.

    1. alternate poet profile image64
      alternate poetposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      The role of the sun 'seasons' in earth climate are already very well known, and the cycles of worming and cooling that go with it.  Just because these things happen does not mean that we are not also responsible for climate changes, in the same way that maybe not all climate change is necessarily a bad thing.

      1. Sab Oh profile image53
        Sab Ohposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        Those cycles of "worming" can be rough...

    2. Ralph Deeds profile image66
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      "Of course, solar activity is just one natural source of climate variability. Another is volcanic eruptions, spewing gas and dust into the atmosphere."

      You have a tendency toward simplistic conclusions.

      The sentence above appeared toward the end of the WP article. The sun is but one NATURAL source of climate variability. It is probably the greatest source of variability. Climate change is the product of natural sources and man made sources--i.e. the stuff we send up into the atmosphere that increases the heating effect of the sun. We can't control the sun and other natural forces, but we can control CO and other gases. Why is that so hard for you to accept?

  2. Aficionada profile image86
    Aficionadaposted 8 years ago

    I read that article too.  I'll be very interested to follow what they discover as they continue studying this.  It's a bit scary to see how the sun's activity is changing currently.  We'll see how it affects us, won't we?

    But uh.... maybe this just means that our CO2 emissions have oozed their way across space to the sun. tongue See, no longer is mankind responsible just for "global warming"; now we have to "Stop Galaxy Changing."  It's all the fault of the human race. tongue  roll

  3. Flightkeeper profile image72
    Flightkeeperposted 8 years ago

    Oh my, that the big solar orb in the sky and not humankind might be the cause of global warming? Say it isn't so! So many self-absorbed lefties are going to be so upset that man is not the center of the world.

    1. Ralph Deeds profile image66
      Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

      It's not either the sun or greenhouse gases! The climate is a product of the sun and other natural forces beyond our control AND greenhouse gases and other man made factors that affect the climate. Your comment is a perfect example of what logic professors call a false dualism.

      1. Flightkeeper profile image72
        Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

        No it isn't, because you nor any real scientist knows what factors go into climate. If they did, they would be able to predict it with certainty over a long period of time and not just our time but for eons past.

        1. Ralph Deeds profile image66
          Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

          Sorry, but you are wrong. The science on the effect of greenhouse gases is quite clear and predictable based on accurate measurements. The natural forces which are beyond our control are what is hard to predict. We know what the effect of CO is on the climate. The problem is that the CO effect could be enhanced, diminished or not changed by natural forces which are harder if not impossible to predict, let alone control. Therefore, the future climate cannot be predicted with certainty.

          1. Flightkeeper profile image72
            Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

            No it isn't clear, or your activist's predictions wouldn't be so bad. lol

            1. Ralph Deeds profile image66
              Ralph Deedsposted 8 years agoin reply to this

              Not "my activist's predictions" 98 percent of climate scientists in the world. And their predictions may or may not turn out to be wrong in the long run. Short term fluctuations don't mean much. The long term trend is what is important. Their predictions on this have not been proven wrong. We'll just have to wait and see.

              1. Flightkeeper profile image72
                Flightkeeperposted 8 years agoin reply to this

                Not been proven wrong? Oh the global cooling that was really a global warming and is now just climate change so that it covers everything. Yeah, that's accurate all right. roll

  4. MikeNV profile image79
    MikeNVposted 8 years ago

    1,300,000 Earths could fit in the Sun.

    That simple enough.

    Turns out the REAL cause of "Climate Change" is the big Orange Orb in the sky.

    Very simple.

    What I find most interesting about Climate Change is each year it's different... some years colder than the others.  And the really strange thing is that according to scientists there were actually periods on this Earth of ours... periods when the climate was both much warmer and much cooler and man wasn't even around.

    Wow... that's a difficult concept to swallow.  I had thought that without man nothing could change.

    No sun.  No life.

    Even simpler.

    I'm gonna go work out now... got to get some extra C02 generated so the people in Europe are not so cold next winter smile

  5. habee profile image95
    habeeposted 8 years ago

    Mike, don't breathe in this direction! I want more snow here in South GA next winter!

 
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