This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (8 posts)

What is THE DIFFERENCE between a BAD BOY and a HOMME FATAL?

  1. gmwilliams profile image85
    gmwilliamsposted 5 years ago

    What is THE DIFFERENCE between a BAD BOY and a HOMME FATAL?

    Both are dark.  However, bad boys have attitude but homme fatales have bad boys beat.They have a dark sophistication and wordliness that bad boys DON'T have.  In fact, homme fatales are a bit MORE DANGEROUSLY and DARKLY appealing than bad boys. Bad boys are BOYS while homme fatales are.......MEN.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/8004134_f260.jpg

  2. cebutouristspot profile image75
    cebutouristspotposted 5 years ago

    Hmm It seems that you already answer your own question. smile  I think you post this on the wrong place

  3. SidKemp profile image94
    SidKempposted 5 years ago

    I like your answer. Another way of saying it is that un homme fatale is French, and French boys grow up into French men. A bad boy is American, and Americans boys never grow up and become men!

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Not necessarily true.  Bad boys can be of any nationality so can homme fatales.  Bad boys are more defiant and out there, sort of a swag. Homme fatales have more of a self-assurance, THEY draw YOU in. The latter has an INNER knowing-a worldly savvy!

    2. SidKemp profile image94
      SidKempposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hi GM: maybe you missed my humor. I don't disagree with the facts you present. Both come from all nationalities. But the images are in tune with certain aspects of the cultures. Male sexual sophistication more French. Bad boy more beat & bluegras

  4. MarleneB profile image98
    MarleneBposted 5 years ago

    It sounds like you answered your own question. And, an excellent answer it is.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, MarleneB.

  5. tsmog profile image81
    tsmogposted 5 years ago

    Thank you for asking this question! Let’s discover with a bit and a byte by exploring. First and foremost consider answering questions of interest is fun. Practicing how to say something with less is interesting. Becoming less wordy may result by being wordy. 

    “Fatale” does mean fatal. Exploring usage seeking meaning Oxford Dictionary offers, “Causing ruin or destruction; disastrous.” As an adjective the noun – Homme is defined.  It is gender neutral, although attributed more with the term “female” than “male” historically. The same is seen with bad boy and good girl. Yet, ponder setting, history, sociology, culture, family values and ages.

    Agreement both are dark with those phrases in various cultures, yet society as a whole may today with the media hold them in a high regard with a status of hero.
    Beat? Humor offered says it depends on the CD, DVD, band, or what may be hummed either aloud or silently.

    Yes, boys are boys. With the English language boy seems to offer more usages with terminology than most languages. Ponder the age old adage, “The difference between men and boys are the price of their toys.” Consider forms of usage like boy with racism - slave, boy with Rites of Passage - fathering, boy with gender type identification – tomboy, boy with hedonism – boy toy, and more. 

    Homme fatales are men most assuredly since Homme does mean man.  The distinction as a type is being destructive seeking to cause ruin. Ponder, what is to be ruined or is ruined.

    How are men vs. boys used in society at large?

    The Marine Corps once said, “Looking for A few Good Men.”

    The Army once said, “We will Make Men out of Boys.” That is common worldwide for differing armed services as branches of government.

    The Navy once said, “Men Wanted,” and sometimes they supplemented with “young.”

    The Air Force still says, “At 'em boys,” midway through the first stanza of their official song. The beginning of the second stanza begins with “Minds of men fashioned . . .”

    Those offer an idea or concept of a difference between men and boys by a perspective of many. Now, known is what a man may be defined as. The question becomes are they destructive seeking to cause ruin?

    Not, enough space. Working on another writing project, therefore here becomes a stop sign or at minimum a yellow light . . .

    Tim

 
working