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jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (12 posts)

If you were a guest in someone's home, would you take something out of their tra

  1. sallieannluvslife profile image86
    sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years ago

    If you were a guest in someone's home, would you take something out of their trash?

    If you were a guest in someone's home overnight, and you saw a handsoap container in the trash that had a small amount of soap left in the bottom - not even enough for the dispenser to pump it to the top - would you take it out of the trash and place it back on the sink, even though there was another new soap already there?

  2. jjackson786 profile image96
    jjackson786posted 4 years ago

    No, I don't think I would. I think the new soap container on the sink replaced the one in the trash, and bathroom trash is pretty gross!

    1. sallieannluvslife profile image86
      sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you jjackson786!  I happen to agree with you.  This happened at our home and I was flabergasted, just thought I was being overly sensitive.

  3. profile image0
    Old Poolmanposted 4 years ago

    Not after I saw the new container sitting on the sink.  I would imagine this person thought they were doing you a favor.

    1. sallieannluvslife profile image86
      sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Exactly, Old Poolman!!!  With the new container on the sink, obviously it was meant to be tossed, since the other wasn't watered down to get to the bottom film of soap!

  4. CraftytotheCore profile image83
    CraftytotheCoreposted 4 years ago

    I knew of someone that did things like that.  I had house guests for a month one time.  I used to buy chicken in large family size quantities and freeze individual amounts for one dinner in ziplock bags.  This guest would take the used ziplock bags out of the trash after I threw them away when the chicken was thawed.  I found a stash of them in my baking drawer!  I was so disgusted, I couldn't believe it.  She didn't wash them out first or anything.  She folded them, with yuck and all in them, and stuck them back in the drawer with my frosting tips, and stuff like that.

    1. bethperry profile image91
      bethperryposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      omg, this person needs therapy!

    2. sallieannluvslife profile image86
      sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Uuuggghhh!  That is worse than my experience....I'm glad no one got sick from them!

  5. bethperry profile image91
    bethperryposted 4 years ago

    No, I would not. I think that is the epitome of rudeness!

    1. sallieannluvslife profile image86
      sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, bethperry!

  6. Lisa HW profile image72
    Lisa HWposted 4 years ago

    I wouldn't, but as far as someone's having done that goes...   

    Devil's Advocate type of reply here...

    I can see how, maybe, the person wasn't sure if the container had fallen into the trash accidentally; and so he figured he'd err on the side of "doing something thoughtful" and put the container back.  Maybe he figured there'd be no harm done if he was wrong about the accidental thing - and better being wrong than letting the thing stay in the trash and get buried.  Some people keep containers with just a little stuff left in them while others don't.  Maybe he just wanted to be sure.

    All that aside, I always keep my open hand soap in front of a brand-new one, so there's always a new one when someone needs it. 

    I don't know...     I always like to err on the side of giving others the benefit of doubt/misunderstanding or general good intentions.  To me, if the person didn't say something like, "Hey, you were wasting that soap so I put it back on the sink," I'd hold off assuming the worst about him.

    Actually, I might do it if I thought the thing fell in the trash by accident - but I'd probably say something about doing it, just in case it wasn't an accident. 

    Not everyone's bathroom trash is all gross.  Some people are pretty vigilant about new trash bags, especially when guests are there.

    1. sallieannluvslife profile image86
      sallieannluvslifeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      I know these guests pretty well and they have done some other pretty off the wall things not only in our house, but others, and have given them the benefit of the doubt for many years.  I just couldn't believe that they would actually do that here.

 
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