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Do you think providing better maternity leave for women in the work place is ben

  1. Michaela Osiecki profile image77
    Michaela Osieckiposted 2 years ago

    Do you think providing better maternity leave for women in the work place is beneficial?

    Why or why not, and what impact will it have on women being more committed to staying with their jobs/careers?

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  2. bradmasterOCcal profile image29
    bradmasterOCcalposted 2 years ago

    Maternity leave doesn't really do anything to help the family after it is over. She goes back to work, but then what happens to the baby? Who takes care of the baby, and how much time can she really spend at work with commuting, 40 hours, plus lunch?

    The baby is going to be needy for many years, and maternity leave with be long gone in the rear view mirror.

  3. Aime F profile image83
    Aime Fposted 2 years ago

    Definitely think the more maternity leave the better. 

    I'm in Canada so we get a year which is great.  I have friends in the US who went back to work after 6 weeks and I can't imagine. 

    I didn't even have breastfeeding established by 6 weeks so I think that would've been doomed had I had to go back then.  Obviously breastfeeding is beneficial to a baby so I think it's important to give a mom and baby more time to establish that relationship.

    Also, most healthy attachments to primary caregivers happen within the first year.  So yes, toddlers are still needy and someone has to look after them but after the first year is a much better time for them to start exploring other attachments. 

    I would have been devastated to go back to work so soon and if it were a viable option then I'm sure I would have opted to just quit my job instead of going back, so yes, I think a longer maternity leave encourages women to stick with their jobs and careers.

  4. profile image0
    LoliHeyposted 2 years ago

    Yes.  I think so.  I think women need to be there for their newborns.

  5. tamarawilhite profile image90
    tamarawilhiteposted 2 years ago

    It leads many businesses to not hire young women for fear of having to pay maternity leave.
    Remember that businesses pay you based on value you produce. That is your job, and theirs.
    They are not social welfare organizations, and benefits they provide are simply another form of payment. Add on mandatory benefits, and they either hire fewer people or don't hire people who could get pregnant.

    1. Aime F profile image83
      Aime Fposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      Companies don't pay for mat leave here, the government does via employment insurance.  Problem solved.

    2. tamarawilhite profile image90
      tamarawilhiteposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      When businesses have to pay for the benefit through taxes and fees, it is a cost on them.
      And if women should be home with the kids, why aren't we giving stay at home mothers more money?

    3. Aime F profile image83
      Aime Fposted 2 years agoin reply to this

      But it's not specific to maternity leave, they're paying into EI for every single employee which covers a variety of things. Lumping mat leave with it takes the discrimination away - they'll be paying the EI whether it's a man or a woman.

  6. LoisRyan13903 profile image81
    LoisRyan13903posted 2 years ago

    When I had my two daughters, I was given 6 week pain marternity leave but was allowed 18 months-this is NYS.  I would say a longer paid time because a lot of daycare providers want an older baby plus the baby may not be ready to be with a sitter at that age.

 
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