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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (7 posts)

Why are we so quick to judge?

  1. Linda's Hub Pages profile image59
    Linda's Hub Pagesposted 8 years ago

    Why are we so quick to judge?

  2. Kebennett1 profile image60
    Kebennett1posted 8 years ago

    I believe it is our sinful nature that causes us to be quick to judge. We were afflicted with this back in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve sinned! Eve just had to have that apple and Adam just had to be influenced by her! Which of coarse is what Satan wanted them to do! Satan wants us to do the same thing! We act quickly so often without thinking first because our flesh is weak, so it is easy for us to judge others. It sure takes the heat off of us for a while, all eyes and ears are on the other person. Sad but true. This is why we are told to build our Spiritual strength. So we can battle against Satan. Maybe next time we will think before we act!

  3. yes2truth profile image61
    yes2truthposted 8 years ago

    What do you mean by judging, because coming to obvious conclusions and voicing those conclusions, is not judging?

    E.g. correcting false teaching is not judging. The Pharisees were not just a first century phenomenon, they were just men of religion who needed correcting and The Lord did so in no uncertain terms: Hypocrites; Nests of Vipers; sons of the Devil; throats like open graves. What a stench!! Was The Lord judging them? No, not at all, just confronting them with their true nature - their religious nature.

    Now that stench, I'm sorry to say, is still around us today only with far greater numbers i.e. mainstream Christianity, all saying and doing very similar things to those first century Pharisees - the men of religion.

  4. Linda's Hub Pages profile image59
    Linda's Hub Pagesposted 8 years ago

    People,please don't get so defensive,what I mean by judging has nothing to do with your answers.I am talking about for instance,people making fun of someone who has had a stroke  & call them retarded.or a girl is bald from cancer & someone laughs at them & calls them a boy,or some one is poor & takes homemade biscuit & potatoe for lunch & people laugh at them.

  5. kenec14 profile image54
    kenec14posted 8 years ago

    Linda, your question "Why are we so quick to judge?"  is completely different from the hurtful acts you describe in your comments.  What you describe in your comments are acts of being heartless and being inconsiderate of others' feelings.  People do this when they have no respect for others or themselves, therefore they attack what they see as a weakness in order to seem "better" than someone else; a seriously flawed way of thinking, but that is their way of thinking nonetheless.
    Now, "Why are we so quick to judge?".....that is a completely different topic indeed.

  6. Darrell Roberts profile image78
    Darrell Robertsposted 8 years ago

    Judging, or evaluating what one is seeing is part of human nature.  The mind and the senses work together to make these assesments.

    I like the saying "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder".  If the beholder has a good heart and good eyes they will see the beauty in all types of life as well as in all human beings.  If they do not have a good heart or good eyes then they hey, they will see as they see. 

    People have the right to their opinions. Unless their judments carry weight in an organization or institution, then it really does not matter.

  7. wesleycox profile image81
    wesleycoxposted 8 years ago

    People judge quickly because of a weakness of character.  I have judged people all too quickly in the past and still today.  Most of my judgements are based on first impressions.  All judgements are not bad though.  Character judgements are ok because it is a tool for assessing a potential friendship.  I think we judge actions because upon first hearing of the action we draw a conclusion as to why they did it.  We form opinions of those actions.  The media influences these judgements too.  I think sinful judgements are the ones we make in regards to religion.  For instance, if I say your an evil person because you commit an act of sin, I am wrong for judging you.

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