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jump to last post 1-11 of 11 discussions (12 posts)

Just curious to know the logic - Why do Muslim women wear the veil, whereas Musl

  1. Shil1978 profile image93
    Shil1978posted 8 years ago

    Just curious to know the logic - Why do Muslim women wear the veil, whereas Muslim men don't?

  2. Pcunix profile image91
    Pcunixposted 8 years ago

    These things usually have a sexual origin.  The fathers and husbands don't want other males attracted to "their" females.

    When you look at all the restrictions and attitudes toward women from a biological point of view, many come from men worried that the children might be someone else's.  I'd guess just about all sexual taboos concerning women, their behavior, their rights and their dress codes come from that basic fear.

    It's really disgusting when you think about it.

    Note that most of the rest of the world requires women to cover their breasts, but men do not have to.  That comes from the exact same reasons - fear of sexual attraction.  Muslims simply extend it to faces.

  3. Arjumand01 profile image56
    Arjumand01posted 8 years ago

    peace be on you...Islam orders veil for both men and women!(Quran surah an nur 24:30-31) the extent of the veil is different as men and women are physiologically and biologically different..The extent of veil for a man is from the naval to the knee and for the woman, the entire body except the face and hands upto wrist.The purpose of the veil  enjoins modesty and prevent indecent acts between opposite gender... its main purpose is to protect the women from molestation and crime...as well as immorality.Veil is something ordained by God to mankind and it is not ordained by men to subjugate women..Men too have the veil to observe...even staring with lust is indecent and breaks the veil...when it comes to men it is far more strict as far as gazing and staring is concerned as compared yo women..the veil of the women is more strict when it comes to clothing.....it is never a subjugation as clothes are a means of modesty,protection   and respect, if Islam wanted to degrade women it would have never allowed her to the right to inherit property,right to education,right to earn,right to freedom of speech and right to religious practice and its benefits... she is entitled the same rights as  men..they are equals. in the eyes of the creator.

  4. muslima61 profile image79
    muslima61posted 7 years ago

    Asalamu alaikum

    Islam did not invent the head cover. This can be proven by many passages from the  Bible. However, Islam DOES endorse it. The Quran urges the believing men and women to lower their gaze and guard their modesty and then urges the believing women to extend their head covers to cover the neck and the bosom:
    It is one of the great ironies of our world today that the very same headscarf revered as a sign of 'holiness' when worn for the purpose of showing the authority of man by Catholic Nuns, is reviled as a sign of 'oppression' when worn for the purpose of protection by Muslim women.

  5. profile image0
    Zakiyaaposted 7 years ago

    There have been lots of studies done to try to show how often men and women think about sex.  Although all of the studies seem to come back with different numbers, they all seem to conclude that men think about sex more often than women.

    In addition to men thinking about sex more often than women, they tend to be more visually stimulated than women. 

    Both men and women are required to be modest.  What determines how modest we should be can be supported by the fact that men and women are attracted to different physical attributes and lust in different ways.

    We still have to be careful not to bucket all Muslim women together.  We are all individuals and every Muslim woman has her own reason for wearing the veil.  In order to understand her reason we must recognize and understand that there are different ways of showing respect.  Some women show that they respect their bodies by showing it off and others demonstrate it by covering it and only showing it to those who are close to her.  Some cultures believe showing off a 'trophy wife' is acceptable while other cultures prefer not to have other men thinking impure thoughts about the woman they love (nor do the women want other men thinking it of them).

    In some cultures women change their last name to their husband's when they get married and wear a ring to show they are no longer single.  In Islam we are encouraged not to change our names in order to maintain our identity and we don't wear a ring.  You will find that some Muslim women start wearing the veil after they are married in order to prevent other men from looking at them and to save the beauty of their bodies only for their love.

  6. ~Kimberly Kay~ profile image77
    ~Kimberly Kay~posted 7 years ago

    A Lot of Christians who read this might be offended at my own answer, but Christianity is actually pretty strict as far as women are concerned.  I agree with Muslims on a few topics; modesty is defiantly one Christians have forgotten.  I go to church and see women at my church and young girls in Shorty shorts, and skirts and dresses so short that the dresses won't be on the chair when they sit; It aggravates me.  So honestly I am fine with the behavior of Muslim women who cover themselves.  I don't understand why people disrespect another person’s religion.  It is not a control thing, but rather a matter of faithfulness to their God that they act in a matter that they believe to be faithful to their God.  It irks me greatly as well, how unfaithful Christians can be.  Some abuse the right of salvation -- in my opinion when we sin without a care and know it is wrong.  I don't know about you, but I have read verses and done some just some research on the head covering or Hijib, and honestly I am unclear on it.  But I will say that I feel that if one is lead to do something according to their faith, and love for their God, they should do it!  These ladies who cover their heads, are doing what they feel lead to do by God, how would you like it if someone knocked your faith on the ground how would you feel?  the fact that they don't care what people think says something to me; and it's that they care more about salvation and living with God in heaven for eternity compared to burning in hell for all eternity.  So it's just disrespectful as far as I am concerned to be so rude as to say it is a controlling thing. It’s weak in my opinion to say so.  I am not Muslim, nor do I want to be.  My argument against Islam is that from what I understand, they do not have the blood of Jesus to wash away their sins, and they are trying to be perfect.  Otherwise I do not know much else.  Feel free to inform me otherwise, but I will not argue, I am a good listener and like to learn new things.  big_smile  o and open minded!  Shocker?!

  7. profile image56
    stoneyyposted 7 years ago

    Recently, I've read that a Muslim lady divorced her husband because he pulled her veil down so he could see her face.

  8. abibelia profile image54
    abibeliaposted 7 years ago

    Key principles are, the law of the aurat (parts of the body that should not be viewed by or disclosed to the person who is not muhrim in Islamic religious law). The laws cover private parts, "aurat for Muslim men are starting from the knee to the center, while the Muslim women's aurat is the whole body except the face, the palms of her hands."

    Your question about the cover for Muslim women's head, now you already know that the head is included for Muslim women's private parts. Why? For God commanded Muslim women should wear the veil when they were out of the house, so different from the pagan women and the female prostitute. For that same God to His Prophet commanded to convey this to his people God's announcement, which reads as follows:

    "O Prophet, say to the wife-wives, daughters and wives of people believers:" Let them out of their garments throughout the body. "So that they might more easily to be recognized, therefore they are not alone. And Allah is Oft-Forgiving, Most Merciful. " (Al-Ahzab: 59)

  9. Dave Mathews profile image60
    Dave Mathewsposted 7 years ago

    either the muslim woman is that "Ugly" or that "Beautiful" Just kidding. It is Up to the Husband whether she wears it or not.

  10. ghzaal profile image59
    ghzaalposted 7 years ago

    Allah says in The Holy Quran; "O Prophet (saw)! Tell thy wives and daughters and the women of the believers to draw their cloaks(veils) all over their bodies (i.e screen themselves completely) that will be better that they should be known(as free respectable women) so as not to be annoyed and Allah is oft-Forgiving,Most Merciful (ch33 Al Ahzab verse;59)
    This shows veil gives respect to women so that nobody annoys them. Islam makes women respectable and precious.It is for their security.

  11. azimimpossible profile image56
    azimimpossibleposted 7 years ago

    Mam Muslim women do wear veil.It is the protector of there modesty.It is just like the case that christian nuns get up.They are covered from head to toe and you cannot call it cruelty of there religion.Muslim men do had veil.But it is in the form of there beard.It is sunnah for Muslim man to keep beard so they are protected from roaming eyes.Also a men eyes is his veil.Watching a lady once is all correct but seeing her twice is sin.So in both the case Islam had veil for men too.

    1. Canscorpion profile image69
      Canscorpionposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      just would like to modify your words to better smile.....
      seeing a lady "unintentionally" once is not objectionable, but intentionally watching the second time or so counts as sin.

 
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