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jump to last post 1-8 of 8 discussions (8 posts)

Should ministers that preach," Do not spare the rod", be liable for child endang

  1. IDONO profile image82
    IDONOposted 6 years ago

    Should ministers that preach," Do not spare the rod", be liable for child endangerment?

    Many people put a lot of faith in the advice of their ministers. Sometimes this isn't good. ( Jim Jones)  However, people look up with trust, to their ministers and if following their advice results in the injury of a child, should a portion of that responsibility be put on the advice-giver?

  2. Don Crowson profile image72
    Don Crowsonposted 6 years ago

    No.  Any responsible parent knows the difference between discipline and beating.  If they don't know the difference, the child won't live very long anyway.

  3. profile image0
    paxwillposted 6 years ago

    No, with a precedent like that, you could sue anybody who gave you advice that turned out bad.  The person receiving advice and information from different sources is responsible for weeding out the bad info and advice from the good.  No one is forced to go to church and listen to a minister. If they do go, they have to have enough sense to figure out which messages are worth following literally, and which are metaphors. 

    A phrase like "do not spare the rod" is not meant to be taken literally, but means that parents should deal out appropriate punishments when their children misbehave, not simply let their kids run wild. A person who would actually hit their kids with a rod has mental problems.

  4. peeples profile image95
    peeplesposted 6 years ago

    No. We are born with a brain for a reason. People should use it. I don't care how many children a person has raised, preached to, taught, or helped in any other way, if they tell me something that doesn't feel morally right for me I'm not doing it.

  5. heavenbound5511 profile image78
    heavenbound5511posted 6 years ago

    Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger by the way you treat them. Rather, bring them up with the discipline and instruction that comes from the Lord.Ephesians 6:4

    Fathers, do not embitter your children, or they will become discouraged. Colossians 3:21

    Since your talking about pastors, my pastor will report anyone to children services if he suspects abuse & he has said so in front of the whole church.

    There is a big difference in between correct discipline and abuse.Abuse causes anger,bitterness and really messes a person up.
    When we even become angry we are not to sin- nothing we do with our children should be out of anger.

  6. backporchstories profile image80
    backporchstoriesposted 6 years ago

    I would say probably not, however, as a child I was raised in a Baptist Church with a preacher who yelled fire and brimstone!  It frightened me away from the church and its teachings.  I was well into adulthood before I realized and conquered the fear that was driven into me when I was so young.  Who was responsible for my fear then?  My parents or the preacher?  I say, it was the environment!

  7. Jaggedfrost profile image78
    Jaggedfrostposted 6 years ago

    trust doesn't equate to culpability or causation.  One would have to be certifiably insane before a simple sermon on discipline would consist as cause for "If not for" reasoning. Now if the Preacher were to go into detail on what punishments should be utilized there might be more grounds.  As was precedented when rock bands would be held liable for music promoting suicide in cases where kids committed suicide after ward.  It is, however a civil issue and not a criminal issue due to the First amendment.  Recent cases concerning cults and media restrictive religious factions have shown that the state may have claim on criminal acts and religious administrators who promote criminal acts. 

    All this to the side. Legally speaking someone would have to go a long way to put the switch in the hand of a preacher if parents go past the point where reason would normally dictate that one would stop in discipline.

  8. DAWNEMARS profile image60
    DAWNEMARSposted 6 years ago

    I beleve that stiking children is wrong. It is likely to result in resentment or worse later on. Probably my "opinion" -but it is one which I hold dear. The parents grow up with physical abuse, so they think it is normal.

    Then when they have their own children they repeat the cycle of abuse. I think that children who suffer this kind of abuse are often afraid to tell anyone. There is nowhere to run or to hide. Parents do not "own" the right to destroy the childhood of another. A person is not  the property of another. Children need to be listened to.

 
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