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jump to last post 1-4 of 4 discussions (11 posts)

Was Jesus Really Born Of A Virgin?

  1. vveasey profile image84
    vveaseyposted 5 years ago

    Was Jesus Really Born Of A Virgin?

    The Hebrew word for virgin, is "almah."   meaning a young woman  of marriageable age, maiden or newly married." 

    When Hebrew scholars, in 200 BC, translated the Hebrew Bible into the Greek Bible, called the Septuagint. They translated the Hebrew word "almah"  using the Greek word "parthenos  meaning virgin.

    This incorrect meaning was eventually translated into Latin and English.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/6870862_f260.jpg

  2. Attikos profile image78
    Attikosposted 5 years ago

    The traditional meaning of the word "maiden" is a virginal young woman. In addition to that, the Gospels do not rely on that one word to say Mary was a virgin, they state it in unequivocal detail.

    You can reject the story on the grounds of skepticism. You can't challenge it on the basis of mistranslation. That doesn't work.

    1. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Look up the word almah and maiden in a bible dictionary and see their meaning and the language they derive from

    2. Attikos profile image78
      Attikosposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Even were you right (you're not) you still are ignoring the rest of the Gospels' story, which to repeat myself does not hinge on that word. Will you at least acknowledge that much?

    3. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      "Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us" Matt 1:23.

      Jesus means Yahweh saves not god with us. that verse doesn't apply to Jesus. wrong name.

    4. Attikos profile image78
      Attikosposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      So you won't. All right. End of story.

  3. CR Rookwood profile image83
    CR Rookwoodposted 5 years ago

    Translation issues aside, I always assumed Mary was pregnant out of wedlock and Joseph stepped in to help her. He was much older and the match was not traditional. In such a patriarchal society, pregnancy outside of wedlock would have put Mary in a very dangerous spot. Joseph prevented any harm that might have come to her for that.

    In the Catholic tradition, the words 'virgin birth' don't refer to whether or not Mary had ever had sexual intercourse, but rather to the belief that Jesus was born without original sin by the grace of the Holy Spirit. The Gospels actually don't say much about sexual sin, and the few scenes that do involve such issues are all about forgiveness.

    This interpretation of the virgin birth deepens the meaning of the story for me. It highlights God's compassion and the idea that Jesus came with a message of love and forgiveness, not a message of legalism and judgment. It also underscores the necessity of compassion for sinners and the poor, and the message that material riches mean nothing in the Kingdom of Heaven.

    1. vveasey profile image84
      vveaseyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      i agree with " Mary was pregnant out of wedlock "

      I think that the virgin birth was a cover story. You can't have the "son of God" or contradictorily, "God in the flesh" born out of wedlock

    2. Attikos profile image78
      Attikosposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That's part of the argument from a position of skepticism.

    3. CR Rookwood profile image83
      CR Rookwoodposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I see you point, but what I like about seeing it your way is that it makes God less of a jerk. So many people make God seem like somebody you'd avoid at the grocery store. I don't believe that's how it really is.

      Good question! Thanks. wink

  4. manatita44 profile image84
    manatita44posted 5 years ago

    No. God does not usually break the plan. But yes, myths build themselves around the lives of some of the Avatars: (descent of God in human form) But his mother and his father were very pure and spiritual people. Those who choose to return for a Higher cause tend to do so via virteous Souls.
    Again, this is not necessary to know and should not occupy your thoughts. Are you trying to make God manifest in your own life? Are you striving to be a good instrument of His Will? Are you compassionate and kind? These are more important questions, right now. God will Himself answer your question, when it is time to know. Much love.

 
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