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Why are there so few black/Afro-american Taoist or Buddhists?

  1. Eugene Hardy profile image61
    Eugene Hardyposted 5 years ago

    Why are there so few black/Afro-american Taoist or Buddhists?

    I'm curious.
    To my knowledge, I'm the only black to study these spiritual traditions and incorporate them into my own spiritual path.

    Is it just my perception?

  2. junkseller profile image85
    junksellerposted 5 years ago

    As an American I have been personal friends with Jews, Muslims, and Christians, but I have never, to my knowledge, even had an acquaintance who was Buddhist. So in part, I think they are just far less common. Also, they seem to be much less visible. They don't seem to have the public communal day-to-day or annual rituals/traditions that the others do.

    I haven't seen any solid demographics, but estimates seem to put American Buddhists at a couple million. So Afro-american Buddhists would probably be in the hundreds of thousands (if that). That's a pretty small group. They are out there, though. The Sōka Gakkai movement has been particularly good at reaching out to minority groups. There are also some Buddhist studies taught at universities. That might be a good place to reach out to.

    1. Eugene Hardy profile image61
      Eugene Hardyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      From where I'm sitting you're probably right about the statistics. 
      But I'm curious as to why this is.

  3. profile image54
    kdawsonposted 5 years ago

    My first wife was Buddhist and so were most of my friends at the time.  I'm no expert but will say that Buddhism is a less overt philosophy/religion.  No or very little evangelical efforts.  Little in the way of religious oppression or war.  They sit back, answer questions and let you come to them.  Most of what I know about Buddhism is from watching the way Buddhists act and this is impressive.

    1. Eugene Hardy profile image61
      Eugene Hardyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I have thought this way too.
      And as a friend pointed out to me today, it is not like they stand out with signs yelling their beliefs.  But my gut says there is more to this....

    2. manatita44 profile image82
      manatita44posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes Eugene. Correct. Follow your own Tao. God speed!!

  4. edhan profile image60
    edhanposted 5 years ago

    It is a sort of infinity that brings a person to be what they believe in. I do believe that you are one of them who is guided to the path in spiritual learning.

    I am a believer of fate where our destiny can be changed if we choose to do so. I am also seeking the path of enlightenment in this life. I do know that once I am able to achieve it, I will no longer be in the cycle of rebirth.

    1. manatita44 profile image82
      manatita44posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Wise words. I wrote to you. Look for my mail in your spam. Just one thing, in Sri Chinmoy's philosophy, 'Let Thy Will be done' is the highest philosophy. There is no greater joy than returning after Enlightenment, to share with our brothers and siste

    2. Eugene Hardy profile image61
      Eugene Hardyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I know that I must follow my own path, and anything else would not be me but some other teaching not my own.  I have to pursue my own Gnosis, my own Tao.

  5. manatita44 profile image82
    manatita44posted 5 years ago

    Well, in my Grenada where I gave talks on Yoga and the Spiritual Life, very few people came. Here in England, I have also been to the black community to give talks. Surprisingly, even there I get more whites than blacks turning up. Finally, I am a member of a spiritual organisation of about 9000. I was the only black person in my Centre for almost 29 years. Now there is one other black person. O.K., so I am really supporting your argument so far.

    Why is it so? Well bro, the Supreme does things in His own way, and ultimately everything is based on the level of what in the East they call consciousness. We seem far superior when it comes to hospitality and good fun. Still, receptivity of spiritual light requires an inner vessel which is prepared. Many of us seem to be busy looking for an identity and so we say 'Jesus' was black or are happier talking about the black heroes of the past, and Africa. This is all good, but true spirituality draws us away from the mind and into the heart, rather like a child. In other words, we need to think less, and practice more.

    As I indicated initially, it is God the Supreme who decides, it may be that we are affected by our karma - causes and effects - our our God's Hour has not yet struck. I admit I do not know. Just food for thought here.

    1. gmwilliams profile image85
      gmwilliamsposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Many Blacks are not drawn to Buddhism and Taoism because they are entrenched in the Christian methodology.   The overwhelming majority of Blacks are staunchly religious Christians who believe that Christianity is the ONLY way!

    2. manatita44 profile image82
      manatita44posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes. That is an important piece in my rationale. Sorry I forgot to include same.

    3. Eugene Hardy profile image61
      Eugene Hardyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I thought about this too.
      But when I think about the statistics, it doesn't add up.  It seems to me to still be an anomaly.

    4. manatita44 profile image82
      manatita44posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Do not make it a problem, Eugene. My last paragragh of the previous answer still holds. It is ultimately God who decides these things.

    5. Eugene Hardy profile image61
      Eugene Hardyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      @manatita44
      Not making it a problem, but if it is God's doing, it makes my question even more curious.  But then, I disagree that God's will would do such a thing, and it is not something I have faith in.

 
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