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Why are artificial contraceptives consider a taboo in Catholics?

  1. sassymomonthego profile image60
    sassymomonthegoposted 5 years ago

    Why are artificial contraceptives consider a taboo in Catholics?

    Catholic Church disapproves the use of artificial contraceptives. Aside from moral and ethics issue, what sins a catholic member can commit if he/she use contraceptives?

  2. profile image0
    Motown2Chitownposted 5 years ago

    The short answer to this question is that artificial contraceptives close off the act of sexual union to the possibility of children, and one of the ultimate reasons for sex in God's plan is procreation.  I say 'one of' because in God's plan, sex is also meant as an act of bonding in marriage.

    As far as the sin element is concerned, sex outside of marriage then becomes more palatable because the chance of unplanned pregnancy is lessened.  People choose  to engage in premarital or extramarital sex more often because one of the practical concerns is taken away.

    1. sassymomonthego profile image60
      sassymomonthegoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Abstinence also hinders procreation, but it is allowed. and I know there are contraceptive users that is in monogamous partnership. I'm curious about what specific sin one commits by just using contraceptives . Anyway, thanks for  your answer.

  3. profile image73
    ElleBeeposted 5 years ago

    Motown2Chitown gave a good, direct answer to this question, but I want to note that closing off the union to children is only one reason artificial contraception is viewed as wrong.

    Catholics believe the two primary aims of sex are the unitive and the procreative - that is to unite husband and wife and to create new life.  BOTH of these aims (not just procreation) are affected by the use of artificial contraception. Catholic teaching says that the "marital act" is meant to be a total and complete giving of self, because using artificial contracpetion holds back part of that self, it prevents the act from being completely unitive.

    Hope these answers both give you a little more info about what you're looking for! If you still want more info let me know, and i'd be happy to point you in the direction of a few encyclicals and Church documents which can explain this teaching better! (I don't have all the documnet names off hand, but I can access them quite easily - I used to teach this.)

    1. sassymomonthego profile image60
      sassymomonthegoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      As I've mentioned, abstinence also hindering marital act, not just holding part of act but the act itself--and still that's allowed, while contraceptives aren't.

  4. sassymomonthego profile image60
    sassymomonthegoposted 5 years ago

    I asked this because reproductive bill in my country is still debatable to pass or not. I am Catholic, I am monogamous. Just because I use contraceptives, doesn't mean I have a plan to bed hop. Unlikely, I love my family. Then someone told me I am committing a sin because of contraceptives. I wonder what specific sin it is. That's why I asked.

  5. profile image0
    Larry Wallposted 5 years ago

    You may be monogamous, but in the Catholic Church, the sex act is limited to married couples. Couples can use abstinence, or other natural methods of birth control. They are not suppose to use artificial contraceptives, be it the pill, IUD or condoms.

    1. sassymomonthego profile image60
      sassymomonthegoposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Hi Larry. I am married to my husband and yea, that's what I am asking, why I can't use artificial contraceptives if Catholics allowed natural ways.

    2. profile image0
      Larry Wallposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Because natural is natural.
      Artificial is viewed as interference in the reproductive process.
      I am not the one to argue this. My wife and I are Catholic, we could not have children, so we adopted our Son. Thus, the issue you raise was not a problem.

 
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